Transparency by Design: Weiss/Manfredi’s Nanotechnology Center

Envelope
Wednesday, February 26, 2014
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UNLIKE MOST LABORATORY BUILDINGS, THE KRISHNA P. SINGH CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY IS DESIGNED AROUND A COURTYARD, WITH GLASS TO ALLOW IN DAYLIGHT (ALBERT VERCERKA/ESTO)

UNLIKE MOST LABORATORY BUILDINGS, THE KRISHNA P. SINGH CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY IS DESIGNED AROUND A COURTYARD, WITH GLASS TO ALLOW IN DAYLIGHT (ALBERT VECERKA/ESTO)

Multiple layers of glass combine with corrugated metal panels to balance visibility and privacy in the University of Pennsylvania’s new research center.

As an experiment in interdisciplinary research, the Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Pennsylvania is not a typical science center. It follows, then, that the university would not want a typical laboratory building, with a central corridor and minimal public space. Instead, the University of Pennsylvania asked Weiss/Manfredi to design the Singh Center around two principles. First, the building should create a new campus green for the school of engineering and applied sciences, in keeping with both the university’s and the city’s tradition of building around open quads. Second, the building should maximize natural light and visibility without compromising the integrity of the research itself. Read More

Review> The New Normal: Penn Symposium Explores Generative Digital Design

Review
Monday, December 16, 2013
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Interior rendering of Neil M. Denari Architects' competition-winning design for the Keelung Harbor Service Building, Taiwan. (Courtesy NMDA)

Interior rendering of Neil M. Denari Architects’ competition-winning design for the Keelung Harbor Service Building, Taiwan. (Courtesy NMDA)

[Editor's Note: The following review was authored by Gideon Fink Shapiro and Phillip M. Crosby.]

A generation’s worth of experimentation with generative digital design techniques has seemingly created a “new normal” for architecture. But what exactly are the parameters of this “normal” condition? On November 14th and 15th Winka Dubbeldam, principal of Archi-Tectonics and the new Chair of the Department of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, called together some of contemporary architecture’s most prominent proponents of generative digital design techniques for a symposium, The New Normal, examining how these techniques have transformed the field over the past twenty years. According to Ms. Dubbeldam and her colleagues in Penn’s post-professional program who organized the symposium, digital tools have “fundamentally altered the way in which we conceptualize, design, and fabricate architecture.” Participants were asked not only to reflect upon the recent past, but also to speculate on future possibilities.

Continue reading after the jump.

The City That Never Was: Learning from the Spanish Housing Bubble

International
Monday, February 25, 2013
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Conditions outside of Madrid. (Jennifer E. Cooper)

Conditions outside of Madrid. (Jennifer E. Cooper)

Described as “crime scene photos,” stark images of Spain’s housing bubble landscapes depict a grim reality. But instead of a somber discourse on the evils of political corruption and real estate speculation, the Architectural League’s symposium this past Friday, The City That Never Was, looked forward and, as Iñaki Abalos aptly asked, wondered if we, “can turn shit into gold.”

Building on their research and design studios at the University of Pennsylvania, Chris Marcinkoski and Javier Arpa, the moderators, explored the future of urbanism through the lens of Spain’s economic crisis and its resulting desolate urban form. Framing the historical context of boom and bust cycles, they reveal that the Spanish situation is only unique in scale and intensity. It exists as part of a larger commodification of urbanism all over the world resulting in similar conditions in an ever simplified placeless urbanism.

Continue reading after the jump.

Notes From Penn Design’s “Architecture Education Goes Outside Itself”

Dean's List, East
Tuesday, February 12, 2013
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ARCHEdem

Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania have been at the forefront of the education of American architects since the late 19th century. This past weekend, the University’s School of Design held a two day conference, Architecture Education Goes Outside Itself, on the evolution of architecture education in the past century-and-a-half from the first “school”—a correspondence course created in nearby Scranton, PA.

A group of young scholars selected, and perhaps inspired, by Penn professor Joan Ockman (whose important new book, Architecture Education: Three Centuries of Educating Architects in North America, thoroughly covers the subject) presented papers on America’s always-evolving efforts to initiate and rethink the education of architects.

Continue reading after the jump.

Australian To Lead University of Pennsylvania’s Landscape Department

East, Shft+Alt+Del
Friday, January 4, 2013
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Richard Weller.

Richard Weller.

The University of Pennsylvania’s School of Design has announced that Australian Richard Weller has been appointed Chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture. Penn Dean Marilyn Jordan Taylor believes that Weller is just the person to build on the department’s well known legacy of research and teaching since it was founded over 50 years ago by the legendary Ian McHarg. The department has been directed by Field Operation’s James Corner since 2000 who asserts that Weller is a “leading edge figure in our field.” Weller has been teaching at the University of Western Australia and was director of both the Australian Urban Design Research Centre and the design firm Room 4.1.3. His current research concerns ways of “conceptualizing, representing and designing cities a mega-regional scale.” In March of this year Weller will release his latest book, Made in Australia, that focuses on the long term future of cities.

On View> Parks for the People Reimagines Our National Parks as Social & Cultural Destinations

East
Monday, November 12, 2012
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(Courtesy Val Alen Institute)

(Courtesy Val Alen Institute)

Parks for the People
The Octagon Museum
1799 New York Ave. NW, Washington, D.C.
Through November 30

Parks for the People presents student ideas of how to reimagine our national parks as natural, social, and cultural destinations. Teams from City College of New York, Rutgers, Cornell, Florida International University, Kansas State, Pratt, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Washington competed in a semester long studio, engaging questions of the preservation, sustainability, accessibility, and technology in 21st century national parks. The National Parks Service, Van Alen Institute, and the National Parks Conservation Association sponsored the competition, which ultimately declared the teams from City College, for their work on the Nicodemus National Historic Site in Kansas, and Rutgers, for their project at the Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in Pennsylvania (above), the winners. All seven entries, each representing a different region of the country, will be on view at the Octagon Museum in Washington, D.C.

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