Mayors, Philanthropies Team Up for Energy Efficiency Blitz

National, News, Sustainability
Thursday, January 30, 2014
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Chicago is one of 10 cities targeted by philanthropies for energy efficiency savings. (josh*m via flickr)

Chicago is one of 10 cities targeted by philanthropies for energy efficiency savings. (josh*m via flickr)

A team of mayors and nonprofit foundations said Wednesday that they’ll spend enough retrofitting major U.S. cities to save more than $1 billion per year in energy costs. Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s philanthropy, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, and the Kresge Foundation pledged $3 million each year for three years to provide technical advisers for 10 cities across the country: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Orlando, Philadelphia and Salt Lake City. Read More

Before & After> 25 of New York City’s Most Transformative Road Diets

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New York City has been adjusting to its new Mayor Bill De Blasio, who took office at the beginning of the year. The new mayor has been slowly revealing his team of commissioners who will guide the city’s continued transformation. As AN has noted many times before, De Blasio’s predecessor Michael Bloomberg and his team already left a giant mark on New York’s built environment.

With little more than paint, planters, and a few well-placed boulders, Bloomberg and former Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan‘s street interventions have been some of the most evident changes around the city. Whether it’s at Brooklyn’s Grand Army Plaza, above, or at Snøhetta’s redesigned Times Square, these road diets shaved off excess space previously turned over to cars and returned it to the pedestrian realm in dramatic fashion as these before-and-after views demonstrate.

As we continue to learn more about our new Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg, take a look back at 25 of the most exciting road diets and pedestrian plaza conversions across New York City from the Bloomberg era.

See more transformations after the jump.

Snøhetta’s Lacy Envelope in Oslo’s Barcode District

Architecture, Envelope, International
Wednesday, January 29, 2014
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The Deloitte Building envelope is composed of 650 white aluminum and glass panels. (courtesy Snøhetta)

The Deloitte Building envelope is composed of 650 white aluminum and glass panels. (courtesy Snøhetta)

A custom designed, prefabricated panel system of white aluminum and glass brings a softer aesthetic to a new development in Norway.

For the Barcode district in Norway—a new, mixed-use high-rise development along the waterfront in central Oslo—the architectural arm of design firm Snøhetta recently completed a 215,000-square-foot building. Two retail levels and 12 levels of workspace for real estate firm Deloitte are wrapped in a prefabricated aluminum and triple-glazed glass facade. Designed to establish a new presence in the Oslo skyline, the firm developed the facade to stand out within the guidelines of the rectilinear master plan and maintains the overall rhythm of the district’s high rises.

Continue reading after the jump.

Across the Los Angeles River, A Statement in Steel Reconnects the City’s Urban Fabric

THE TAYLOR YARD BRIDGE WILL LINK CYPRESS PARK AND ELYSIAN VALLEY (STUDIO PALI FEKETE ARCHITECTS)

THE TAYLOR YARD BRIDGE WILL LINK CYPRESS PARK AND ELYSIAN VALLEY (STUDIO PALI FEKETE ARCHITECTS)

“We got very attracted to the project, and to the idea of making something that reconnects Los Angeles,” Zoltan Pali said of Taylor Yard Bridge, the pedestrian and bicycle bridge designed by his firm, Studio Pali Fekete architects (SPF:a). Originally introduced as part of a mitigations package twenty-two years ago, the bridge, which will span the Los Angeles River between Cypress Park and Elysian Valley, should be completed within two years at a cost of $5.3 million. Read More

On View> MoMA Presents “Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal”

Art, City Terrain, East, On View, Urbanism
Tuesday, January 28, 2014
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Model of Frank Lloyd Wright's Broadacre City. (Courtesy MoMA)

Model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacre City. (Courtesy MoMA)

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal
Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street, New York, NY
February 1 to June 1

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal will represent the first exhibit resulting from the recent join acquisition of the architect’s archives by MoMA and Columbia University’s Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library. The models, drawings, and films found within the extensive collection will allow the museum to illustrate the tension in Wright’s urban thinking in the 1920s and 30s.

Even as he undertook projects that contributed to the increasingly vertical nature of American cities, he created a radical horizontal vision of urban life known as Broadacre City. The elaborate model of this agrarian metropolis created by Wright and his students will be displayed alongside the architect’s designs for the San Francsico Call Building, Mahattan’s St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie Towers, and a largely theoretical mile-high skyscraper.

Stunning Site and Stunning Shortlist at UC Santa Cruz

Architecture, Newsletter, West
Monday, January 27, 2014
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Capacity studies for the Institute and the surrounding arts area.The Institute will be on the site of the red buildings in the center.  (Walker Macy)

Capacity studies for the Institute and the surrounding arts area.The Institute will be on the site of the red buildings in the center. (Walker Macy)

For weeks we’ve been hearing murmurs about the hottest RFQ in California: the UC Santa Cruz Insitute of Arts and Sciences, a hilltop museum, research center, and innovation hub on one of the most beautiful campuses in the country. Finally the shortlist has been announced, and it features a group of very heavy hitters from around the country.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architecture Bookstores Are Dead. Long Live An Architecture Bookstore?

Interior of the Rizzoli Bookstore. (Garrett Ziegler / Flickr)

Interior of the Rizzoli Bookstore. (Garrett Ziegler / Flickr)

Last week news broke that the Rizzoli Bookstore on 57th Street  is doomed. The owners of the well-loved building, which is not officially landmarked, plan to demolish it to to make way for another luxury residential tower. This set off another round of fretting about the future of bookstores, especially art and design bookstores.  But the news for bookstores might not be all bad. We hear that a new Urban Center may be brewing that would join together at least 11 New York civic organizations that have been adrift in hidden offices all over the city into a single “center” with an exhibition space and an architecture book store. Stay tuned.

Watch a video of the Rizzoli Bookstore after the jump.

Nervous System’s 4D Printing Software

Fabrikator
Friday, January 24, 2014
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A proprietary hinge design connects rigid panels of various sizes and configures pieces to fold like fabric. (courtesy Nervous System)

A proprietary hinging system connects rigid panels of various sizes and configures to fold like fabric. (courtesy Nervous System)

A new program prints folded shapes to achieve large finished products that move like fabric.

Digital design dynamo Nervous System has released proprietary 4D printing software that allows 3D-printing enthusiasts to produce flexible, three-dimensional shapes on selective laser sintering devices. The concept came from a partnership with Motorola to design a fast and efficient platform to print anything, anywhere, but the company’s designer and founder, Jesse Louis-Rosenberg, said the technology is just not there yet. “You’ve got the tools to make anything, but speed doesn’t afford dimensionality, so it’s counter-intuitive.” To push against those boundaries, their system prints complex, foldable shapes from articulated modules that can unfold into a larger form. Read More

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Lighting Designers Give New Life To an Abandoned Finnish Silo

Art, Design, International, Newsletter
Thursday, January 23, 2014
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(Courtesy Lighting Design Collective)

Punctured and illuminated, an oil silo on the Helsinki coastline has been recast as a permanent art installation. Silo 468 was commissioned in part to commemorate the city’s 2012 appointment as a World Design Capital. Madrid-based Lighting-Design Collective were brought to the Finish city for the drastic transformation project. Continue reading after the jump

Shigeru Ban’s Modern Penthouse Addition Unites Indoor and Outdoor Spaces in Manhattan

Architecture, East, Newsletter, Preservation
Thursday, January 23, 2014
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Ban addition archpaper1

(Renderings Courtesy Hayes Davidson)

Renderings for Shigeru Ban‘s rooftop addition to a landmark Tribeca building have been revealed. Newly recast as a luxury residential space, the 132-year old cast-iron building located at 67 Franklin Street at Broadway is set to receive a new metal-and-glass-clad cap. This twin duplex penthouse will be joined by a revamped interior also designed by the Japanese architect. The existing structure will be filled by 11 duplex apartments.

Continue reading after the jump.

A Life-Saving Proposal for San Francisco’s Sidewalks

SOUS LES PAVES ENVISIONS A GREEN NETWORK OF CROSSWALKS, MEDIAN STRIPS, AND CITY PARKS (OPA)

SOUS LES PAVES ENVISIONS A GREEN NETWORK OF CROSSWALKS, MEDIAN STRIPS, AND CITY PARKS (OPA)

Can better design save lives? That question is at the center of a proposal by Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects (OPA) to transform crosswalks along San Francisco’s Divisadero Street. The project, Sous Les Paves, originated in a GOOD design challenge by the Center for Architecture and Design. With help from AIA San Francisco, OPA partnered with local advocacy organization Walk San Francisco in a bid to improve pedestrian safety at street crossings.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bierman Henket Architect’s Cloud-Based Museum Design

Envelope
Wednesday, January 22, 2014
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A horizontal band of glass separates the old structure from the new addition. (Joep Jacobs)

A horizontal band of glass separates the old structure from the new addition. (Joep Jacobs)

A neoclassical museum in the Netherlands gets an iconic update and vertical expansion of ceramic and glass.

The Museum de Fundatie in Zwolle, the Netherlands, houses an international collection of art and sculpture. Its venerable neoclassical edifice symbolizes the city’s rise from its Medieval foundations into the 19th century period of enlightenment. Designed in 1840 by Eduard Louis de Coninck, the building reflects the dissolution of feudalism and a dynamic, forward-thinking perspective on the future. Now, a recent expansion of the museum has shown that the city has not stopped evolving, but is in fact moving quite steadily into the 21st century. The elliptical, organically formed addition, designed by Bierman Henket Architecten, perches atop the 19th century structure, its textured ceramic facade evincing a progressive aesthetic hitherto unknown to this sleepy Dutch town.

Read More

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