The Trouble with Eighth Street

East
Monday, August 1, 2011
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Eight Street businesses have seen better days.

Bohemian Eight Street has seen better days. (AN/Stoelker)

In his poem “One Winter Afternoon,” e.e. cummings describes Eighth Street in Greenwich Village at the “magical hour when is becomes if.” Well, it seems as though Eighth Street has reached that hour once again. The street, which once played a distinct role in Village bohemia, began as a hub for book dealers and fostered the original Whitney Museum. Eventually, the street became a district for shoe stores and edgy fashion anchored by Patricia Field. Field decamped for the Bowery about nine years ago and much of the street has since devolved into a hodgepodge of chain stores and characterless low-end retail.

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School + Pool: Parsons Makes Waves with Splash House

East
Friday, July 29, 2011
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Design Workshop's Splash House at Highbridge Pool and Recreation Center.

Practice makes perfect, and for some Parsons students, the Splash House at Highbridge Pool and Recreation Center is a jumping off point for becoming better architects.

Parsons’ Design Workshop, a design-build studio set up 15 years ago to offer practical training to students, has partnered with New York Parks and Recreation Department to instigate a five-year initiative to identify and implement improvements in public spaces across the city. “The architecture students get a more holistic understanding of process,” said Kate McCormick, Press Officer at Parsons. “They actually learn how to make and engage the community, by finding out what it needs.” Although it usually collaborates with public organizations both inside and outside Manhattan, this is the Workshop’s first long-term municipal partnership within New York City. The first assignment: Highbridge Pool and Recreation Center in Upper Manhattan. Read More

UrbanSHED Design Competition Prototype

Fabrikator
Friday, July 29, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

The Urban Umbrella is an alternative to traditional construction sheds (DOB)

A prototype of the city’s alternative to unsightly construction sheds is unveiled.

Two years after the NYC Department of Buildings and AIA New York launched the UrbanSHED competition to find a new sidewalk shed design that would beautify city streets, a prototype of the winning proposal has been unveiled. Called Urban Umbrella, the shed structure was developed by competition winner Young-Hwan Choi with architect Andrés Cortés and engineer Sarrah Khan of New York-based Agencie Group. Brooklyn-based architecture and fabrication firm Caliper Studio was hired late last year to detail and build the much-anticipated design, which the DOB and architecture, construction, and real estate backers hope will eventually replace unsightly sidewalk scaffolding at many of the city’s construction sites.

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Center for Architecture Grows in the Village

East
Thursday, July 28, 2011
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New York's Center for Architecture just signed a lease to expand next door. (AN/Stoelker)

With all the NYU real estate hubbub going on around LaGuardia Place in Greenwich Village, it’s refreshing to hear of a quiet transaction between two locals. This week, the AIANY signed the lease for 532 LaGuardia, an empty retail space owned by local lumber magnate Guy Apicella just one door south of the AIANY’s current home, the Center for Architecture at 536 LaGuardia.

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On View> Light Pavilion by Lebbeus Woods & Christoph A. Kumpusch

Newsletter, West
Thursday, July 28, 2011
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Rendering of Woods & Kumpusch's Light Pavilion. (Courtesy MAK)

Rendering of Woods & Kumpusch's Light Pavilion. (Courtesy MAK)

Light Pavilion by Lebbeus Woods and
Christoph A. Kumpusch: Construction
Drawings & In-Process Photographs at the
Mackey Garage Top
MAK Center at the Schindler House
835 North Kings Road
West Hollywood
Through August 6

The Light Pavilion by Lebbeus Woods and Christoph A. Kumpusch was created for Steven Holl’s Sliced Porosity Block project now under construction in Chengdu, China, and will be Lebbeus Woods’ first built work of architecture. A physical intervention into Holl’s rectilinear structure, the pavilion consists of a series of columns and stairs that are illuminated from with and change color, and the luminous effect will be amplified by the pavilion’s mirrored interior walls. The MAK exhibition includes construction drawings and process photographs of the installation, as well as conceptual renderings of this project, above, and other work of Woods and Kumpusch.

See more after the jump.

ACADIA Design and Fabrication Competition Winners Announced

Fabrikator
Friday, July 22, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

The RECIP modular furniture system designed by students of the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Environmental Design

Three winning designs to be fabricated by Brooklyn-based Flatcut.

This October, winners of the ACADIA (Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture) design and fabrication competition will show off their parametric chops as part of the organization’s annual conference, now in its 30th year. Announced last week, winners were chosen from 15 finalists by a jury that included Tod Williams of TWBTA, Chris Sharples of SHoP Architects, Tom Wiscombe of Emergent, Dror Benshetrit of Studio Dror, and Thomas Christoffersen of BIG. The competition sought designs in three categories—furniture, partitions, and lighting—and entrants were encouraged to propose hybrid material assemblies that minimized waste and maximized material performance. Tomer Ben-Gal, founder of Brooklyn-based fabrication studio and competition co-sponsor Flatcut, served as technical advisor. Flatcut will fabricate the winning designs in its 100,000-square-foot Passaic, New Jersey, machine shop before they are sent to the conference, held at the University of Calgary, where they will be displayed from October 11-16.

Click here to see the winning entries.

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Going Green in Ghana: Mario Cucinella’s One Airport Square

International
Friday, July 22, 2011
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One Airport Square in Accra, Ghana. (Courtesy Mario Cucinella Architects)

One Airport Square in Accra, Ghana. (Courtesy Mario Cucinella Architects)

Of Sand and Stone. On September 8th, Milan-based architect Mario Cucinella will break ground on his One Airport Square project in Accra, Ghana’s capital city. The 230,000 square foot structure of irregular cantilevered floor plates embraced by a web of diagonal concrete supports meant to evoke traditional African patterns. Plans call for a dynamic pedestrian plaza with shops and cafes topped with commercial space. Solar panels are integrated among cantilevered terraces with indigenous fauna to protect the building from the scorching sun.

Check out a video and gallery after the jump.

On View> Weightless Pull at Superfront Public Summer

East
Thursday, July 21, 2011
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Weightless Pull (Courtesy CO)

Weightless Pull (Courtesy CO)

Christina Ciardullo and Naomi Ocko
Superfront Public Summer
2nd Avenue between 35th and 36th Streets
Industry City / Sunset Park, Brooklyn
Through August 28

Christina Ciardullo and Naomi Ocko‘s (CO) winning design Weightless Pull for Superfront Public Summer opened Sunday, July 17th and will be on view through August 28th. Christina Ciardullo and Naomi Ocko designed the space with a focus on geometry, mechanics, and materials. With a particularly specific method of installation, the collaborative studio observed the conditions of the space and calculated needs for the project based upon the presence of wind between two industrial buildings.

Weightless Pull, constructed much like a series of slender sails, creates a vertical wind field composed of plastic wrap, nylon rope, and 600 different knotting systems. The resulting movement emphasizes the scale of the location. As the architects noted, “a volume is created by the blowing out of long horizontal lengths of plastic rising from the ground to 80 feet above at the height of the surrounding buildings.”

Check out a video of Weightless Pull after the jump.

On View> Hiroshima: Ground Zero 1945, an exhibition and a mystery

East
Thursday, July 21, 2011
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Hiroshima: Ground Zero 1945, International Center of Photography.

Hiroshima: Ground Zero 1945
International Center for Photography
1133 Ave. of the Americas at 43rd St.
Through August 28

An abandoned suitcase, a house fire, strange markings on old photographs. These were the key clues in a mystery that Adam Harrison Levy began to unravel almost ten years ago when researching a BBC documentary about the bombing of Hiroshima. Levy’s intriguing narrative now serves as the backdrop for the black-and-white photographs in Hiroshima: Ground Zero 1945, an exhibit running through August 28 at the International Center for Photography in New York. On July 20 at the Van Alen bookshop, Levy read from his essay in the exhibition catalogue while ICP curator Erin Barnett discussed her research for the show of 60 photographs, all drawn from an ICP collection of almost 700 images that once belonged to Robert L. Corsbie.

Continue reading after the jump.

Competition> Envision a Future for the Pruitt-Igoe Site

Midwest, Newsletter
Thursday, July 21, 2011
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Pruitt-Igoe as planned. (all images courtesy Pruitt-Igoe Now)

Building on the renewed interest in the destruction of the Pruitt-Igoe public housing complex in St. Louis, a new competition looks to engage the history and inspire possible future uses for the 33 acre site. Nearly 40 years after the demolition–which Charles Jencks claimed signaled the death of Modern architecture itself–most of the site remains cleared, filled in with trees and grasses that have sprung up over time. Organized by the newly formed non-profit Pruitt-Igoe Now, the competition brief asks, “Can this site itself be liberated from a turbulent and mythologized past through re-imagination and community engagement?” Read More

AN Video> Esplanade Walk-Through with Amanda Burden

East
Friday, July 15, 2011
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View of the Esplanade from under the FDR at Wall Street.

On Thursday, the East River Waterfront Esplanade officially opened to the public. Last week, while the paint on the new bike lanes was still drying, City Planning Commissioner Amanda Burden took AN on a walk through of the first section.  The commissioner barely contained her excitement while showing off design details by landscape architect Ken Smith and SHoP Architects. Follow the commissioner as she takes us through the dog run and points out clever details like the “Get-Downs,”  the riverside bar stools,  and “seat walls.”

 

Watch video after the jump.

On View> Made in China With A Human Touch

East
Friday, July 15, 2011
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Courtesy 0.00156 Acres/Lorena Turner

Lorena Turner: Made in China
0.00156 Acres
114 Smith Street
Brooklyn, NY
Through July 31

Product packaging started primarily for hygienic reasons. General stores used to stock sugar, crackers, and pickles in huge barrels, and for every order the grocer would dip in his scoop. Not only was it unsanitary, but customers also might leave wondering if they got what they paid for (“Was his finger on the scale…?”). Food packaging guaranteed sterile products and standardized portions—in a word, purity.

Continue reading after the jump.

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