Holcim Awards for Sustainable Construction 2012

International, Newsletter
Thursday, March 29, 2012
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Urban Remediation and Civic Infrastructure Hub, São Paulo, Brazil

Urban Remediation and Civic Infrastructure Hub, São Paulo, Brazil

The Holcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction in Zurich, Switzerland has announced the winners of its 2012 Global Holcim Awards and the Holcim Innovation Prizes. Regional prize winners (15 for Global Awards and 53 for Innovation Prizes) were examined, and from them 3 Global Awards and 3 Innovation Prizes were handed out to projects that address environmental performance, social responsibility, and economic efficiency.

Each of the winning projects are innovative, future-oriented, and usually have a social or cultural component as a key part of their program.  This year’s jury for the Global Awards was headed by TEN Arquitectos’ Enrique Norton and included critic Aaron Betsky and architect Mario Botta. The Innovation Prize Jury was led by architect Harry Gugger and included economists and engineers.

Check out all the winners after the jump.

Hollywood Freeway Park Gains Allies in High Places

West
Thursday, March 29, 2012
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LA’s proposed 44-acre Hollywood Central Park, which would be set atop the capped 101 Freeway between Santa Monica and Hollywood boulevards, made new friends in Washington last week, according to the LA Daily News. U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood met with local congressman Adam Schiff and Friends of the Hollywood Central Park (FHCP), a non-profit formed in 2008 to raise funds for the park. LaHood expressed interest in the project, and provided insights on its development and possible benefits. He also offered to have members of his staff contribute to its planning process.

Continue reading after the jump.

Coney Gets a Gateway

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 27, 2012
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The city's plans for a new $11 million entrance to Coney Island beach (Courtesy NYC EDC)

The city's plans for a new $11 million entrance to Coney Island beach (Courtesy NYC EDC via Gothamist)

The New York Post says the city’s plans for the new entrance to Coney Island are just “beachy” and “spectacular” while Gothamist tells readers to “behold …a grand beachfront entrance fit for pharaohs.” The plan replaces the sixty-year-old Eighth Street Bridge with a sweeping new plaza at Tenth Street. The change may be welcome compared to the decayed structure that greets visitors now, but does it have anything to do with the Coney of ‘ol New York? Read More

Jeff Koons Proposes Bringing Trains Back to the High Line

East, West
Tuesday, March 27, 2012
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Courtesy Friends of the High Line

When preliminary designs for the third and final section of the High Line were revealed, the designers presented several options including flowerbeds and amphitheater seating for the Tenth Avenue Spur, an offshoot of the park that stands above the intersection of 10th Avenue and 30th Street. The design team’s aim is to make the Spur one of the main gathering spaces in the park. Now, with the proposal of a massive installation by artist Jeff Koons calling for a suspended locomotive over the park, the Spur may become exhibition space as well.

Continue reading after the jump.

Google Fires Ingenhoven from Mountain View Headquarters Project

Eavesdroplet, Newsletter, West
Tuesday, March 27, 2012
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An early conception of the campus created by the city of Mountain View.

You can’t even, well, Google it yet, but we’ve picked some meaty news from the grapevine: Google has fired German firm Ingenhoven Architects as the designers of its new headquarters in Mountain View, California. The building, to be located on 18.6 acres next to the current “Googleplex,” off of North Shoreline Boulevard, would measure a maximum of 595,000 square feet and house 2,500 to 3,000 employees, including executives, engineers, and scientists.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Princeton Zeroes in on Zaero-Polo as Next Dean (Updated)

Dean's List, East, Shft+Alt+Del
Tuesday, March 27, 2012
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Alejandro Zaera-Polo in front of his Yokohama Terminal project in Japan. (Wikipedia and Naoya Fujii/Flickr)

Alejandro Zaera-Polo in front of his Yokohama Terminal project in Japan. (Wikipedia and Naoya Fujii/Flickr)

It is now confirmed that the next dean at Princeton University School of Architecture will be Alejandro Zaera-Polo. The last lap of the race to take Stan Allen’s position as dean had narrowed down to three with odds on one of the several female contenders including Sylvia Lavin and Keller Easterling. But when the London-based, Spanish-born architect was called in London on March 18 and asked to fly to Princeton, where he is currently a visiting lecturer, the die seemed cast. And now Dean Allen confirms.

Continue reading after the jump.

Design Looks Up with Bluarch’s Cloud Installation

Fabrikator
Friday, March 23, 2012
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

The ceiling-mounted installation in made of 144,000 poplar pieces assembled by hand (Bluarch)

A geometric ceiling installation creates an organic, light-diffusing shape in a new Port Washington restaurant

New York-based architecture and interiors firm Bluarch has become known for innovative designs that have people looking up. The group has created ceiling installations for residences, restaurants, and retail locations across the world. One of their latest projects is close to home, at Innuendo restaurant and bar in Port Washington. Located on Main Street, the restaurant’s seamless storefront reveals a cloudlike ceiling installation with integrated lighting designed to create an ever-changing atmosphere.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Middle Eastern Ambitions at the Center for Architecture

East
Friday, March 16, 2012
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A model of a Frank Lloyd Wright plan for Baghdad. (AN/Stoelker)

A model of a Frank Lloyd Wright plan for an opera house in Baghdad. (AN/Stoelker)

City of Mirages: Baghdad, 1952–1982
Through May 5

Change: Baghdad, 2000–Present
Through June 23

Center for Architecture
536 LaGuardia Place

Two complimentary exhibits at the Center for Architecture capture an aspirational past and equally ambitious present in the Middle East. City of Mirages: Baghdad, 1952–1982 shows a flourishing cosmopolitan city that—whatever the regime—commissioned an impressive array of international design talent for much of the last century resulting in an architecture combing modernist ideas with interpretations of the local climate and culture. Through models and drawings, including Walter Gropius and Hisham A. Munir’s campus building (top) at the University of Baghdad, rather than photographs in order to emphasize the optimistic intentions of the period, City of Miracles sheds light on a significant but rarely seen corner of global modernism. CHANGE: Architecture and Engineering in the Middle East, 2000–Present surveys 123 contemporary works from 20 countries in the wider Middle East, including Asymptote and Dewan Architects’ Yas Marina Hotel in Abu Dhabi (above), gathered through an open call for submissions. The impact of rapid growth and instant globalization is evident through supertalls, man-made islands as well as UNESCO monument sites under siege.

Read More

Infrared’s Madren 5340 Installation

Fabrikator
Friday, March 16, 2012
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

The completed installation controls light and opacity between two sides of a room (Infrared)

Temporary structure uses paper to create light-regulating filter

Infrared is a group of architectural researchers and fabricators based in Thessaloniki, Greece. Initiated in 2010, the group’s work has included public installations like the Thess Bic Seat, an amorphously shaped bicycle rack and bench. Another piece called 313 / 315 is a 25-foot-long seesaw installed between two rooms of a derelict hotel created for last year’s XV Biennale De La Mediterranee. For its most recent installation, titled Madren 5340, the team investigated the theme of private space with a digitally modeled screen made with a series of paper tubes.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rudin Reaches Agreement for AIDS Memorial

East
Wednesday, March 14, 2012
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The AIDS Memorial winner "Infinite Forest" by Brooklyn-based studio a+i will be substantially scaled back for Triangle Park.

The AIDS Memorial Park winner "Infinite Forest" will be substantially scaled back for Triangle Park. (Courtesy studio a+i)

With the prodding of  City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, the Rudin Management Company agreed to hand over the the last smidgen of property at Triangle Park  for use in an AIDS memorial. The park sits across the street from St. Vincent’s Hospital where so many AIDS patients were cared for and died. After months, indeed years, of wrangling, the gateway park to the West Village will move forward largely as originally planned, with M. Paul Friedberg incorporating components of the memorial by AIDS Memorial Competition winner studio a+i into the park design. The 1,600 square foot memorial will sit at the park’s westernmost edge, replacing a triangular building that stored oxygen tanks for the now defunct hospital.

Read More

LA Kicks Cars to the Curb, Opens First Pedestrian Plaza

Newsletter, West
Wednesday, March 14, 2012
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Sunset Triangle Plaza opens to the public. (Alissa Walker / Flickr)

Sunset Triangle Plaza opens to the public. (Alissa Walker / Flickr)

You’d better get used to it, Los Angeles is remaking itself from a one trick pony town where car is king into a multimodal city for pedestrians, cyclists, and transit users. The latest improvement is Sunset Triangle Plaza, the city’s first pedestrian plaza created by a new collaboration called Streets for People (S4P) that hopes to churn out dozens new pedestrian-oriented spaces a year across the city. The green-on-green polka dot plaza officially opened this month to crowds of gleeful pedestrians in the hip enclave of Silver Lake, northwest of Downtown LA.

Continue reading after the jump.

AIANY Honors 2012 Design Award Winners: Unbuilt Work

East
Wednesday, March 14, 2012
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Dortoir Familial, NADAAA, Inc.

Dortoir Familial, NADAAA, Inc.

[Editor's Note: This the third in a four-part series documenting the winners of the AIANY's 2012 Design Awards, which are broken down into four categories: architecture, interiorsunbuilt work, and urban design. This list covers awards for unbuilt work.]

The AIANY has released its annual list of Design Awards noting projects that demonstrate exemplary originality and quality, and the category covering unbuilt work tends to be among the most creative. This year’s Honor and Merit Award winners for unbuilt work were selected by a jury consisting of Scott Erdy of Erdy McHenry Architecture, Thomas Hacker of THA, and Bruce Lindsey, dean of the College of Architecture at Washington University. Three unbuilt projects were distinguished with the top Honor Award including the Hirshhorn Museum Seasonal Inflatable Pavilion by Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Kling Stubbins, Dortoir Familial by NADAAA, Bidard & Raissi, and Agence François Vieillecroze, and the USAFA/Center for Character & Leadership Development by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Winning work in all four categories will be on display ay the Center for Architecture at 536 LaGuardia Place beginning April 19 through May 31.

Check out the winners after the jump.

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