Giveaway! Enter to Win a Seat at the Non-Linear Lab on Digital Fabrication

National
Thursday, August 30, 2012
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Studio Mode | modeLab is excited to announce a promotional offer for the upcoming NON-LINEAR LAB: Growth Systems and Digital Fabrication with Skylar Tibbits. With generous support from The Architect’s Newspaper and Fabrikator, we are giving away a Complimentary Seat to this intensive design workshop. The Lab is scheduled for September 8th/9th and will be a weekend full of programming, parametric design, and digital fabrication. Come design and make some wild prototypes with us!

Promotional Details: “Like” us and enter to win a free seat in the Lab. Winner announced Friday, August 31st at 11:59PM EST.

Lab Details: NON-LINEAR LAB is two-day workshop on Growth Systems, Parametric Detailing, and Digital Fabrication. This Lab is the next installment in our coLAB series and is the result of collaborative research undertaken by Skylar Tibbits [SJET + Previous coLAB Instructor] and Ronnie Parsons + Gil Akos [Studio Mode/modeLab]. In a fast-paced and hands-on learning environment, we will cover Fundamental Concepts of Programming and Parametric Design as well as an introduction to Laser Cutting Constraints and Best Practices. Emphasis will be placed on iterative prototyping, allowing for a thorough investigation of a series of Growth, Component, and Detailing Scripts using Python and Grasshopper while working directly with our CNC equipment.

EVENT> Architecture & the Media: Trade Press, An Evolving Role

East
Thursday, August 30, 2012
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Architecture & the Media #3: Trade Press, an Evolving Role
Thursday, September 6
6:00-8:00pm
Center for Architecture
536 LaGuardia Place

Traditionally, publication in a trade magazine was an effective way to reach peers and demonstrate credibility to clients. Are trade publications becoming hybrids of journalism and networking sites, two-way streets where users are more engaged with editors?

Join us at the Center for Architecture on September 6 for a panel discussion on design reporting, the third installment of Architecture & the Media, a four-part series exploring today’s media landscape co-produced by the Center for Architecture, AIANY’s Oculus and Marketing & PR Committees, and The Architect’s Newspaper.

For Trade Press: An Evolving role, moderator and AN executive editor Alan Brake will be joined by editors Katie Weeks of Eco-Structure magazine, Linda Barr of Real Estate Weekly, Stacy Shoemaker Rauen of Hospitality Design magazine, and Diana Moser of Multi-Housing News.

Tickets: $10 for members and students, $20 for non-members.
PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

Race Street Rising

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, August 29, 2012
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Race Street Tower. (Courtesy Peter Gluck)

Retail will wrap around the proposed tower’s base at Second and Race Street (Courtesy Peter Gluck and Partners).

Last week Philadelphia’s new zoning code went into effect, but projects nurtured under the old code may still be rising. Just yesterday, architect Peter Gluck presented a tower proposal to the Old City Civic Association for a 16-story building adjacent to the Ben Franklin Bridge. Because the zoning permits were filed last month the building is subject to old code.

Gluck’s presentation of 205 Race Street soured when new renderings revealed that an early proposal by SHoP Architects, initially approved at a 100-foot height, had morphed into a 197-foot tower that sets back from Race Street, PlanPhilly reported. The group voted 11 to 1 to oppose the project.

Continue reading after the jump.

Golden Lions Awarded Amid Divisive Venice Biennale

International
Wednesday, August 29, 2012
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Torre David / Gran Horizonte, 2012, Urban-Think Tank (Alfredo Brillembourg, Hubert Klumpner), Justin McGuirk. (Francesco Galli/Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia)

Torre David / Gran Horizonte, 2012, Urban-Think Tank (Alfredo Brillembourg, Hubert Klumpner), Justin McGuirk. (Francesco Galli/Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia)

It’s been a hot and highly stimulating few days at the Venice Biennale. David Chipperfield’s theme, “Common Ground,” which sought to establish connections across architecture culture, has proven surprising divisive. Some loved the elegant progression of projects in the Arsenale, which included everything from expressionist displays by Zaha Hadid, to neo-postmodern confections by FAT, to a hand built house by Anupama Kundoo, all of which managed to mingle thanks to Chipperfield’s tasteful curation.

Some formalists griped that the show was regressive, while more socially engaged architects thought it too estheticizing. Still, every Biennale must crown its winners. This year’s Golden Lion for the international exhibition went to Torre David/Gran Horizante by Urban-Think Tank (Alfredo Brillembourg and Herbert Klumpner) and Justin McGuirk, an investigation, featuring photography by Iwan Baan, of an informal community built in an abandoned, unfinished skyscraper in Caracas. The team created an bar inside the Arsenale which featured food, music, drinks, and neon lights to showcase their work and transform the atmosphere of the overall exhibition.

Continue reading after the jump.

PRODUCT> Rock Chair, by Fredrik Färg for Design House Stockholm

Newsletter, Product
Tuesday, August 28, 2012
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This streamlined Scandinavian stunner is not your granddaddy’s rocking chair.

We have lounges, chaises, day beds and a range of other seating options designed for nesting, curling up, reclining and relaxing, yet the rocking chair, that front porch symbol of lazy day languor, has been mostly forgotten by modern design. In fact, Design House Stockholm, the self-described publishing house for contemporary Scandinavian design, noted that “at some time in the 20th century the design development of the rocking chair stopped” altogether. With that in mind, Stockholm-based furniture designer Fredrik Färg created Rock Chair, a rocking chair that “continues the traditional rocking chair’s comforting function but in a modern design.”

More after the jump.

Facebook Likes Gehry: Sprawling Expansion Unveiled for Menlo Park

West
Monday, August 27, 2012
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Frank Gehry's plans for a new Facebook campus. (Courtesy Gehry Partners)

Frank Gehry’s plans for a new Facebook campus. (Courtesy Gehry Partners)

Perhaps trying to regain its mojo after a difficult summer on the stock market, Facebook has selected Frank Gehry to design an expansion to its Menlo Park Campus in California. The project, scheduled to break ground next year, will include a quirky 420,000-square-foot warehouse topped by a sprawling garden. The cavernous space will contain open offices for as many as 2,800 software engineers, according to Everett Katigbak, Facebook’s environmental design manager. The firm wouldn’t reveal the project’s price tag.

Continue reading after the jump.

BLOOM, The Olympic Design-Build Game

Fabrikator
Friday, August 24, 2012
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator ad_small

BLOOM

A 100 percent PET plastic garden grows in London

If you were fortunate enough to visit the London Olympics this summer and happened to walk through Victoria Park or the main quad at University College London (UCL) on your way to the games, then you experienced BLOOM, a big, bright, architectural garden created by complete strangers who gathered over the course of the two weeks to piece together 60,000 plastic game pieces, all dyed official Olympic hot pink. Designed by Alisa Andrasek and Jose Sanchez, two architecture professors from UCL’s Bartlett School of Architecture, BLOOM was selected by the Greater London Authority for a series of events and installations mounted in two locations during the games with a third location in Trafalgar Square to follow for the upcoming Paralympics.

Andrasek and Sanchez had been developing the idea for an open-ended, crowdsourced game that would encourage interaction between people in a large public space when the opportunity to be involved with the Olympics arose. The timing was perfect. Here was a moment in the city’s history when locals and tourists alike would be in the same location to celebrate athletics, and Andrasek and Sanchez hoped to capitalize on that spirit of camaraderie. The game starts with the pink game pieces, called cells. Each 16 inch-long cell is made of 100% PET plastic and has three points of entry, or notches used to connect the pieces together. Once Andrasek and Sanchez created a design for the cells, they were injection molded at Atomplast, a Chilean plastics fabricator that Andrasek and Sanchez had worked with previously. The cells are flexible, durable and can be bent and twisted into different configurations without warping or breaking. There were also several structural steel components on hand for using with the cells to build benches, tables, forts and other larger formations. Read More

FreelandBuck’s Slipstream Installation Hits The Auction Block

International, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 21, 2012
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Slipstream installation at the Bridge Gallery in New York by FreelandBuck. (Courtesy FreelandBuck)

Slipstream installation at the Bridge Gallery in New York by FreelandBuck. (Courtesy FreelandBuck)

Inspired by Lebbeus Woods’ “Slipstreaming” drawing series envisioning the dynamics of flow, New York- and LA-based FreelandBuck architects designed Slipstream, a colorful installation made of CNC-cut birch-veneer plywood currently on display at New York’s Bridge Gallery through August 24. Now the sculpture could flow out of the Lower East Side gallery and into your home or apartment. Citing storage constraints, FreelandBuck has placed Slipstream on eBay and the installation—all 1,400 pieces of it—could be yours for cheap.

More after the jump.

Product> Haiku, by Big Ass Fans

Product
Tuesday, August 21, 2012
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A ceiling fan that's actually as energy-efficient as it claims.

A ceiling fan that’s actually as energy-efficient as it claims.

Big Ass Fans are, as their name suggests, a producer of very large fans. They’re used everywhere from dairy barns to art galleries to outdoor public installations like Wendy, HWKN’s star-shaped pavilion for MoMA PS1’s summer Warm Up series. They also make residential models, like Haiku, the latest product in their line up. Once you get over the eye roll-inducing slogan—Haiku: Poetry in Motion—it’s a really incredible product. According to Energy Star it’s the world’s most efficient residential ceiling fan, and even exceeds their efficiency requirements by 450 to 750 percent. Whereas most fans use 90 to 100 watts, the Haiku uses just two to 30 watts, costing an average of $5 per year.

Continue reading after the jump.

Chris Burden Builds a “Small Skyscraper” in Old Town Pasadena

Newsletter, West
Tuesday, August 21, 2012
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Chris Burden's <em>Small Skyscraper</em> (Sam Lubell / AN)

Chris Burden’s Small Skyscraper (Sam Lubell / AN)

Next time you visit old town Pasadena you may be in for a suprise. When you slink down an alley off of Fair Oaks and Colorado, the next thing you see will be a four-story, 35-foot-tall skyscraper, sitting in the middle of a courtyard. It’s an installation by artist Chris Burden (yes, he’s the one that did the cool lights and all the matchbox cars at LACMA) called Small Skyscraper (Quasi Legal Skyscraper).

Burden collaborated with LA architects Taalman Koch on the open design, which conists of slabs of 2x4s supported by a thin aluminum frame. Burden started envisioning the project back in the 90s, but at that time the idea was for a solid structure made of concrete blocks. This one is lightweight and seems almost like an erector set. Presented by the Armory Center for the Arts, Small Skyscraper will be on display until November.

More photos after the jump.

Will Maltzan’s “Lens” in St. Petersburg Be Too Murky?

East, West
Monday, August 20, 2012
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Visitors to The Lens probably won’t be able to see all these cool creatures. (Michael Maltzan Architecture)

Last January, Florida welcomed Michael Maltzan Architecture’s stunning proposal for the St.Petersburg Pier, featuring a new tidal reef, a civic green, raised walking paths, a waterpark and many other attractions. Recently however, local marine scientists have concluded that the tidal reef element of the design is simply too good to be true, according to a report in the Tampa Bay Times. Named “The Lens,” Maltzan’s scheme calls for a figure-8 spatial organization, in which a loop provides a view into the clear water below. But Tampa Bay’s estuary waters are murky—not because of pollution but simply because of sediment—making the water too foggy for any kind of tidal viewing. Maltzan’s ideal emerald waters are expected to remain a fantasy, but scientist and architects are still trying to find others ways to provide an underwater view in the Lens.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bloomberg: Bike Share Delayed Until Spring 2013, Duh

East
Friday, August 17, 2012
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(Montage by The Architect's Newspaper)

(Montage by The Architect’s Newspaper)

Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced this morning on his morning radio show that New York City’s forthcoming CitiBike bike-share program—already mired with delays caused by software problems—would be further delayed until at least next spring, confirming rumors that the system’s bugs weren’t being worked out quickly enough. On his radio show, the mayor delivered the bad news, “The software doesn’t work, duh.” He maintained that, “we are not going to put out the system until it works.” The highly anticipated program is set to become the largest is North America when it opens and was a signature piece of the mayor’s bike infrastructure plan for the city.

Continue reading after the jump.

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