Architectural League Honors Amanda Burden’s Commitment to Quality Design

East
Tuesday, April 10, 2012
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Amanda Burden. (David Malosh)

Amanda Burden. (David Malosh)

Amanda Burden, Chair of the New York City Planning Commission and Director of the Department of City Planning, is the recipient of the Architectural League of New York’s highest honor, the President’s Medal. The League’s President and Board of Directors grant the award to individuals in recognition of an exceptional body of work in architecture, urbanism, or design. The medal was presented to Burden last night at an awards ceremony.

Continue reading after the jump.

Christie’s ARC Accounting Questioned.  New Jersey Governor Chris Cristie's tunnel numbers are being questioned (Courtesy crooksandliars.com). The accounting methods that New Jersey Governor Chris Christie used to put the kibosh on new cross Hudson train tunnel were called in to question in a report released today, the New York Times reports. Christie said that the project, called the Access to the Regions Core (ARC), could run up to $14 billion, but independent Congressional investigators found that it would cost no more than $10 billion. He also claimed that New Jersey would foot more than 70 percent of the bill, but investigators said it would have been more like 14 percent. It should be noted that a constant Christie critic, Senator Frank R. Lautenberg, commissioned the report. No matter, it seems to be no skin off the governor’s nose. NJ.com grabbed a quotable quote from the governor speaking in New York this morning at the George W. Bush Institute Conference on Taxes and Economic Growth: “So when they want to build a tunnel to the basement of a Macy’s and stick the New Jersey taxpayers with a bill of $3 to $5 billion over, no matter how much the administration yells and screams, you have to say no.”

 

Bjarke Gets A Tan: Twin Torquing Towers Planned in Miami

East, Newsletter
Monday, April 9, 2012
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The torquing towers. (Courtesy Grove at Grand Bay)

The torquing towers. (Courtesy Grove at Grand Bay)

After a loss in Chicago, Bjarke Ingel’s North American tour continues unimpeded as the design for his latest project, a set of twisting towers in Coconut Grove, Miami, was revealed at an invitation-only party in late March. Called the Grove at Grand Bay, the set of 20-story towers will contain a combined 96 luxury residences, 59 units in one tower and 37 in the other, on the three-acre site currently occupied by the once-hip-but-now-shuttered Grand Bay Hotel that once entertained the likes of Michael Jackson, Prince, and Pavarotti. Tenants of the new towers, however, are likely to be just as rich and possibly as famous.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Twenty Years Later, Las Vegas’ Starship Enterprise That Almost Was

West
Monday, April 9, 2012
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1992 Downtown Las Vegas proposal that was nearly built. (Courtesy Goddard Group)

1992 Downtown Las Vegas proposal that was nearly built. (Courtesy Goddard Group)

The above might be the most spectacular project to (n)ever happen. In 1992, The Fremont Street Experience, by the Jerde Partnership, became the project that was built to save downtown Las Vegas, at a time when the boom of casinos along “The Strip” was siphoning business from the city’s core. But no one knew—until now—that apparently the real winner of that project’s competition was Gary Goddard and his team, who claim to have proposed to build a full-scale Starship Enterprise in downtown Las Vegas. The spectacular mirage-city in the Nevada desert is the only place where a project this amazing could ever (not) happen.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Spur to Action: Philly Brings Elevated Park Plans into Focus

East
Friday, April 6, 2012
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Proposed entry to the SEPTA Spur (image courtesy of Studio Bryan Hanes).

Proposed entry to the SEPTA Spur (image courtesy of Studio Bryan Hanes).

Philly is one step closer to creating an elevated park on an abandoned rail viaduct. Studio Bryan Hanes and Urban Engineers, two firms collaborating on the design of the SEPTA Spur phase of Philadelphia’s Reading Viaduct, have released new images of the reclaimed railway that bring the proposal into focus. The Spur represents a significant step in realizing the vision of the elevated park with a primary entrance from Broad Street that rises from grade to the elevated rail line. The first phase stops just shy, however, of the wider, more programmable space on the main Viaduct.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gehry Technologies Discusses Burj Khalifa Ceiling

Fabrikator
Friday, April 6, 2012
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

The completed ceiling (SOM)

Members of the Gehry Technologies New York office outline a collaboration that spanned between four U.S. cities and Dubai

Editor’s Note: The following has been excerpted from Knowledge Engineering: The Capture and Reuse of Design and Fabrication Intelligence on the Burj Khalifa Office Ceiling by Neil Meredith and James Kotronis of Gehry Technologies:

Behind schedule and with the finish date of the building fast approaching, Gehry Technologies was presented with a unique problem. A complex, double-curved wood ceiling for one of the main entrances to the Burj Khalifa (then Burj Dubai) was under construction and it was becoming apparent that the proposed system would not work as designed. Instead of delaying the schedule or scrapping the design, an integrated team was quickly mobilized. This team was based in different design and fabrication domains, with all participants working toward the shared goals of redesign, fabrication, delivery, and installation of the new ceiling, all within a tight timeframe and construction site. Partners included Skidmore Owings and Merrill (SOM), Imperial Woodworking Company (IWA), ICON Integrated Construction and Gehry Technologies/New York (GT). Working through the design issues, the new team developed a strategy to strip the design back down to essential geometry and redesign the system from the ground up, satisfying design intent and a host of fabrication and constructability constraints through a shared parametric model.

Continue reading after the jump.

BMW Guggenheim Lab to Park in Berlin After All.  BMW Guggenheim Lab to Park in Berlin After All Facing the possibility of anti-gentrification protests, the Guggenheim decided to cancel plans to bring the BMW Guggenheim Lab to the city’s Kreuzberg district. They have decided to bring the lab to the already gentrified Prenzlauer Berg instead, specifically the Pfefferberg cultural center, according to Spiegel online. “The decision to relocate the Lab was not an easy one, but we are very pleased to have so quickly confirmed such a suitable alternative and to continue the urgent and important discussions we have begun about cities, and specifically about Berlin, at the Pfefferberg site,” Richard Armstrong, director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, said in a statement. Time will tell if the move will mollify critics and protesters.

 

Chicago Architect Attempting to Kickstart A “Super-Furniture”

International, Midwest, Newsletter
Thursday, April 5, 2012
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Beuys/Hefner House (Courtesy Bureau Spectacular)

Beuys/Hefner House (Courtesy Bureau Spectacular)

What is a Super-Furniture? According to Chicago architect Jimenez Lai of Bureau Spectacular, it is “a building that is kind of too small, or a couch that is kind of too big.” Whichever way you prefer to think of it, Lai’s plan to live in one of the his installation-scale Super-Furniture, in this case called the Hefner/Beuys House, for a month inside a London gallery is a provocative project where “suddenly architecture becomes performance art.”

Building? Couch? Check it out!

Celebrate Earth Day With a “Neutra Run-Walk” in Silver Lake

West
Wednesday, April 4, 2012
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Silver Lake Reservoir, home of the Neutra Run-Walk for Health.

Silver Lake Reservoir, home of the Neutra Run-Walk for Health.

Architecture lovers, time to get motivated. This Earth Day (April 22) you can celebrate Richard Neutra’s 120th birthday by participating in the Neutra Run-Walk for Health, a 4k or 8k jaunt around LA’s Silver Lake Reservoir. “Neutra always stood for health, so it made sense to host this event,” said Dion Neutra, son of the famous architect. Neutra says he hopes the walk will become an annual event for the Neutra Institute.

Continue reading after the jump.

Willets Point to Rise from Ashes

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, April 3, 2012
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The city's plans for Willets Point took a giant step forward with federal approval of highway ramps (Courtesy NYCEDC).

The city's plans for Willets Point took a giant step forward with federal approval of highway ramps (Courtesy NYCEDC).

In Fitzgerald’s Great Gatsby the billboard eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg kept watch over the ash heaps near Willets Point. For the past four years Mayor Bloomberg has had his eyes steadfastly fixed on the site and it looks as though he may realize his vision of the area as a mixed use development. Today Crain’s reports that a key part of the redevelopment plan, ramps connecting to the Van Wyck Expressway, was approved by the Federal Highway Administration.

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Chipperfield to Revamp Mies’ Neue Nationalgalerie

International
Tuesday, April 3, 2012
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Ciro Miguel/flickr

Stirling Prize winner David Chipperfield will renovate of Mies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, beating out more than 20 competing proposals. The museum, which houses the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation’s modern art collection, has not undergone any major renovation since it was completed in 1968.

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Australians Plan Pavilion for 2015 Venice Biennale

International
Tuesday, April 3, 2012
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The Australian Pavilion.

The Australian Pavilion. (Courtesy Denton Corker Marshall)

The Venice Biennale is staged in an enormous old Arsenal building and in an urban park a few blocks away that houses 30 national pavilions. The first of these pavilions opened in 1907 and several were designed by famous architects like Josef Hoffmann (Austria), BBPR (Canada), Alvar Aalto (Finland), and Sverre Fehn (Nordic). The United States pavilion was designed by William Adams Delano. There have been very few buildings built in the garden since James Sterling designed the biennial book store in 1991, but just behind the U.S. pavilion the Australians are building a new exhibition space designed by Denton Corker Marshall. The Australian architects describe the pavilion as a simple structure or “a white box contained within a black box.” The pavilion will open in 2015 for the 56th art biennale and its $6 million price tag will be paid for with private funds.

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