Let There Be Light: Cleveland Museum of Art’s New Atrium Open

Midwest
Friday, September 7, 2012
.
A view of the skylight that defines Cleveland Museum of Art's new atrium. (Courtesy Bruce Kratofil via Flickr.)

A view of the skylight that defines Cleveland Museum of Art’s new atrium. (Courtesy Bruce Kratofil via Flickr.)

After seven years of construction, during much of which visitors were sent on an underground detour, the Cleveland Museum of Art’s expansive atrium opened in late August.

The 39,000-square-foot Rafael Viñoly-designed atrium is essentially a massive skylight, which arcs from 55 to 66 feet in height across a space nearly as large as a football field. Planting beds complement the granite floor, anchoring an airy space that houses a second floor mezzanine and could seat upwards of 700 people for events.

Continue reading after the jump.

La Voûte de LeFevre, a study in stereotomy

Fabrikator
Friday, September 7, 2012
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator

LaVoutedeLeFevre

New modeling software enables experimental volumetric design

In a revolt against the realm of the 3D renderings they feel contemporary architects are confined to working within, Matter Design‘s principals Brandon Clifford and Wes McGee founded a studio grounded in digital design that addresses the realities of materials, loads and physicality. Clifford in particular mourns the loss of our “ability to work with volume,” so much so that he spent his year as the 2011-12 LeFevre Emerging Practitioner Fellow at Ohio State University Knowlton School of Architecture researching volume in building with a special focus on stereotomy, the art of precisely carving solids. It was this research that led him to design La Voûte de LeFevre, a vaulted wooden structure that soars thanks to weight and mass, not in spite of it.

Continue reading after the jump.

Slideshow> Tour One World Trade Looming Over Lower Manhattan

East
Thursday, September 6, 2012
.
The site.

The site.

One World Trade continues to rise with the spire yet to come. Today, the Port Authority gave AN access to the 103rd floor. In a mad dash we took a few hundred photos, which we quickly whittled down to these 34. What’s missing are the sounds: workers shouting, metal clanging, and Queen’s “We Will Rock You” playing from a radio on the  ride up. Tomorrow, we’re stopping by to visit One World’s little brother, Four World Trade.

View the slideshow after the jump.

Hotel Made from Shipping Containers Planned for Detroit’s Eastern Market

Midwest
Thursday, September 6, 2012
.
Collision Works would be a boutique hotel made from shipping containers in Detroit's Eastern Market area. (Courtesy Detroit Collaborative Design Center.)

Collision Works would be a boutique hotel made from shipping containers in Detroit’s Eastern Market area. (Courtesy Detroit Collaborative Design Center.)

Following the many interesting developments in Detroit these days, one gets a sense that the city’s post-industrial landscape is fertile ground for innovative design. A boutique hotel made of shipping containers seems to back up that trend.

Collision Works, as the project is called, touts the structural merits of shipping containers. “Shipping containers are considerably more durable than standard construction, can cost less, and most importantly are about 30 percent faster to build,” writes project founder Shel Kimen.

Continue reading after the jump.

Chelsea Market Expansion Approved at City Planning

East
Wednesday, September 5, 2012
.
New renderings of the Chelsea Market edition shows a set back of massing from the High Line. (Courtesy Jamestown)

New renderings of the Chelsea Market edition shows a set back of massing from the High Line. (Courtesy Jamestown)

In a unanimous vote today, the New York City Planning Commission approved Jamsestown Properties’ plans for expansion at Chelsea Market with few modifications. The building was rezoned to be included in the Special West Chelsea District, thereby allowing developers to increase density after a significant contribution is made to the High Line. Much to the quite literal relief of High Line visitors, this likely means bathrooms will finally find their way to the southern section of the park.

Continue reading after the jump.

Finding Common Ground at the Venice Biennale: Practice What You Preach, Mr. Prix

International
Wednesday, September 5, 2012
.
Wolf Prix. (Elfie Semotan)

Wolf Prix. (Elfie Semotan)

“Venice Architecture Biennale ‘cannot get any worse’ says Wolf D. Prix,” read the headline on Dezeen’s August 30 wire post. In a press release titled “The Banal,” Prix declared that that architects participating in the biennale are “playing” while the profession is “sinking into powerlessness and irrelevance” at the hands of politicians, bureaucrats, and investors.

The broadside caused a stir in Venice during he opening and in the blogosphere but now it appears that Prix was never in Venice for the biennale in the first place and thus had not seen the exhibition he denounced. His office claims that Prix has been misunderstood and “the critique addressed the theme of the exhibition, not the show or its execution,” according to a spokesperson for the firm.

Continue reading after the jump.

Picnics, Monuments & Memorials: Two Centuries on Two Blocks

East
Tuesday, September 4, 2012
.
The September 11th Memorial at night.

The September 11th Memorial at night. (Tom Stoelker / AN)

Literally in the shadow of One World Trade is a memorial for September 11 that has been overrun by tourists since the days after the disaster. Its quiet dignity has been maintained, outlasting the dozens of hawkers who sold Twin Tower replicas just a few feet away. The memorial bears but one name, “Mary Wife of James Miles,” who died on September 11, 1796.

Today’s New York Observer weighed in on the New York Post‘s claim that tourists are turning the September 11 Memorial into a glorified playground. “When the construction barriers finally come down, the lines will be gone, people will come and go as they please. They will pray and they will play, and that is how it should be,” wrote the Observer’s Matt Chaban. As the debate continues as to what constitutes appropriate behavior at the memorial, one need only walk one block east to take in two century’s worth of history on how New Yorkers memorialize.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Lowline’s Underground Light Canopy

Fabrikator
Friday, August 31, 2012
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator ad_small

Lowline Canopy

A 600-panel tessellation spreads sunlight underground

By now you know about the Lowline, the ambitious project to turn the 1.5 acre abandoned trolley terminal under Delancey Street in New York City into a public park. In just two weeks the project’s founders, Dan Barasch and architect James Ramsey, will unveil a preview of the remote skylight system designed to transmit sunlight into the Delancey Underground in a life-size, fully functional installation currently being built into the Essex Street Market. Ramsey designed the remote skylights with a network of fiber optic cables that channel light gathered by a solar collection dish down below ground where it’s dispersed. To make the most of the available sunlight, Ramsey enlisted the help of industrial designer Edward Jacobs, the former head of design at Confederate Motors, the high-end motorcycle company, who Ramsey describes as “a visionary and pretty much the most talented guy I’ve ever met.”

To disperse the sunlight as far as possible, Jacobs developed a tessellated canopy system made up of 600 ⅛ inch-thick hexagonal and triangular panels laser cut from clear anodized aluminum and bent in a hydraulic press. In an effort to maximize the sunlight’s reach, the tessellated curvature is so specialized that no two panels are exactly alike. To get the shape and size of each panel just right, Jacobs worked with the engineering group Arup on materials testing and light readings, noting that 3D rendering only goes so far because “the ideas of light perception amount and reflectance can be quite counter intuitive.” The panels, which are fabricated by Milgo Bufkin in Brooklyn, are labeled according to their position in the overall structure and screwed together with fold-over tabs on each side. The canopy is then attached to a four-cable truss system Jacobs developed so the entire 1,350-pound unit can be easily raised and lowered for maintenance. A few cables will also be attached to the outer edges of the canopy to eliminate any possibility of sag between the structural rib span, completing a system that Jacobs describes as “a combination of cable slings, clevises, electrical winches and safety hooks.” Read More

Giveaway! Enter to Win a Seat at the Non-Linear Lab on Digital Fabrication

National
Thursday, August 30, 2012
.

Studio Mode | modeLab is excited to announce a promotional offer for the upcoming NON-LINEAR LAB: Growth Systems and Digital Fabrication with Skylar Tibbits. With generous support from The Architect’s Newspaper and Fabrikator, we are giving away a Complimentary Seat to this intensive design workshop. The Lab is scheduled for September 8th/9th and will be a weekend full of programming, parametric design, and digital fabrication. Come design and make some wild prototypes with us!

Promotional Details: “Like” us and enter to win a free seat in the Lab. Winner announced Friday, August 31st at 11:59PM EST.

Lab Details: NON-LINEAR LAB is two-day workshop on Growth Systems, Parametric Detailing, and Digital Fabrication. This Lab is the next installment in our coLAB series and is the result of collaborative research undertaken by Skylar Tibbits [SJET + Previous coLAB Instructor] and Ronnie Parsons + Gil Akos [Studio Mode/modeLab]. In a fast-paced and hands-on learning environment, we will cover Fundamental Concepts of Programming and Parametric Design as well as an introduction to Laser Cutting Constraints and Best Practices. Emphasis will be placed on iterative prototyping, allowing for a thorough investigation of a series of Growth, Component, and Detailing Scripts using Python and Grasshopper while working directly with our CNC equipment.

EVENT> Architecture & the Media: Trade Press, An Evolving Role

East
Thursday, August 30, 2012
.

Architecture & the Media #3: Trade Press, an Evolving Role
Thursday, September 6
6:00-8:00pm
Center for Architecture
536 LaGuardia Place

Traditionally, publication in a trade magazine was an effective way to reach peers and demonstrate credibility to clients. Are trade publications becoming hybrids of journalism and networking sites, two-way streets where users are more engaged with editors?

Join us at the Center for Architecture on September 6 for a panel discussion on design reporting, the third installment of Architecture & the Media, a four-part series exploring today’s media landscape co-produced by the Center for Architecture, AIANY’s Oculus and Marketing & PR Committees, and The Architect’s Newspaper.

For Trade Press: An Evolving role, moderator and AN executive editor Alan Brake will be joined by editors Katie Weeks of Eco-Structure magazine, Linda Barr of Real Estate Weekly, Stacy Shoemaker Rauen of Hospitality Design magazine, and Diana Moser of Multi-Housing News.

Tickets: $10 for members and students, $20 for non-members.
PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

Race Street Rising

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, August 29, 2012
.
Race Street Tower. (Courtesy Peter Gluck)

Retail will wrap around the proposed tower’s base at Second and Race Street (Courtesy Peter Gluck and Partners).

Last week Philadelphia’s new zoning code went into effect, but projects nurtured under the old code may still be rising. Just yesterday, architect Peter Gluck presented a tower proposal to the Old City Civic Association for a 16-story building adjacent to the Ben Franklin Bridge. Because the zoning permits were filed last month the building is subject to old code.

Gluck’s presentation of 205 Race Street soured when new renderings revealed that an early proposal by SHoP Architects, initially approved at a 100-foot height, had morphed into a 197-foot tower that sets back from Race Street, PlanPhilly reported. The group voted 11 to 1 to oppose the project.

Continue reading after the jump.

Golden Lions Awarded Amid Divisive Venice Biennale

International
Wednesday, August 29, 2012
.
Torre David / Gran Horizonte, 2012, Urban-Think Tank (Alfredo Brillembourg, Hubert Klumpner), Justin McGuirk. (Francesco Galli/Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia)

Torre David / Gran Horizonte, 2012, Urban-Think Tank (Alfredo Brillembourg, Hubert Klumpner), Justin McGuirk. (Francesco Galli/Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia)

It’s been a hot and highly stimulating few days at the Venice Biennale. David Chipperfield’s theme, “Common Ground,” which sought to establish connections across architecture culture, has proven surprising divisive. Some loved the elegant progression of projects in the Arsenale, which included everything from expressionist displays by Zaha Hadid, to neo-postmodern confections by FAT, to a hand built house by Anupama Kundoo, all of which managed to mingle thanks to Chipperfield’s tasteful curation.

Some formalists griped that the show was regressive, while more socially engaged architects thought it too estheticizing. Still, every Biennale must crown its winners. This year’s Golden Lion for the international exhibition went to Torre David/Gran Horizante by Urban-Think Tank (Alfredo Brillembourg and Herbert Klumpner) and Justin McGuirk, an investigation, featuring photography by Iwan Baan, of an informal community built in an abandoned, unfinished skyscraper in Caracas. The team created an bar inside the Arsenale which featured food, music, drinks, and neon lights to showcase their work and transform the atmosphere of the overall exhibition.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 66 of 105« First...102030...6465666768...8090100...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License