Obit> Jane Holtz Kay, 1938-2012

National
Wednesday, November 21, 2012
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Jane Holtz Kay in 1986.

Jane Holtz Kay in 1986.

Noted author and critic Jane Holtz Kay passed away November 5 at the age of 74 from complications of Alzheimer’s disease. Her book Asphalt Nation: How the Automobile Took Over America and How We Can Take It Back propelled her into the national spotlight as she chronicled the affects of cars on the American landscape. Jane Jacobs remarked about the book, “Jane Holtz Kay’s book has given us a profound way of seeing the automobile’s ruinous impact on American life.” She had been working on a sequel to Asphalt Nation, documenting climate change and global warming, called Last Chance Landscape. Holtz Kay was also architecture critic for The Nation and formerly for the Boston Globe. She is survived by her sister, Ellen Goodman, daughters, Julie Kay and Jacqueline Cessou, and four grandchildren. The staff at The Architect’s Newspaper sends our condolences to her family, friends, and colleagues.

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Happier Holidays for Architects as Billings Continue to Climb

National
Wednesday, November 21, 2012
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BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

Heading into the holidays, the AIA has more good economic news to report: the Architectural Billings Index (ABI) has recorded a third straight month of growth. The October score was 52.8, up from September’s 51.6 (any score above 50 indicates a growth in billings). The uptick reflects improving conditions in the housing market and real estate more broadly. All four regions were in positive territory, with  the South leading at 52.8, followed by the Northeast at 52.6, the West at 51.8, and the Midwest at 50.8.

Continue reading after the jump.

Deborah Berke Designing 700 Residences in Lower Manhattan Art-Deco Skyscraper

East
Wednesday, November 21, 2012
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Looking up at 70 Pine. (12th St David / Flickr)

Looking up at 70 Pine. (12th St David / Flickr)

Move over Woolworth Building. Another iconic Lower Manhattan skyscraper is slated for a residential conversion, this time by Deborah Berke Partners and architects of record Steven B. Jacobs Group. The 66-story art deco landmark at 70 Pine Street was built in 1932 as the Cities Service Company, and more recently served as the headquarters of American International Group (AIG), and now developer Rose Associates plans to transform the tower into 700 luxury apartments above a 300-room hotel.

Continue reading after the jump.

MVRDV Proposes A Tower of Life-Size Stacked “Building” Blocks

International
Tuesday, November 20, 2012
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Lower base of structure from the ground (Courtesy MVRDV)

Lower base of structure from the ground (Courtesy MVRDV)

Dutch architecture office MVRDV has placed a bid to create a 1,300-foot-tall skyscraper in Jakarta, Indonesia called Peruri 88. The complex arrangement of edifices, which resembles a city’s worth of buildings stacked atop one another along the lines of a massive assembly of life-size “building” blocks covered with greenery, is MVRDV’s answer to Jakarta’s need for densification and green space.

Continue reading after the jump.

Doctors Say Famed 104-Year-Old Architect Oscar Niemeyer’s Condition Is Getting Worse

International
Tuesday, November 20, 2012
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104-Year-Old Architect Oscar Niemeyer in Hospital

104-Year-Old Architect Oscar Niemeyer in Hospital.

The health of Oscar Niemeyer is deteriorating according to a recent statement released by the hospital treating the 104-year-old architect in Rio de Janeiro. The world-renowned architect—known for his design of civic buildings in the capital city of Brasilia—landed in the hospital on November 2nd after he caught a cold that resulted in kidney failure.

He took a turn for the worse last week when he experienced bleeding in his digestive track. The hospital says that he is now breathing with the help of machines, and is lucid. Up until recently, Niemeyer, who is less than a month shy of his 105th birthday, has continued to work on projects.

PRODUCT> “Le Corbusier and the Power of Photography”

Product
Tuesday, November 20, 2012
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LeCorbusier_PowerofPhotography

“Le Corbusier and the Power of Photography”

Though books typically fall outside the scope of what we consider to be architectural products, we’re making an exception for Thames & Hudson’s new publication, Le Corbusier and the Power of Photography. Those familiar with Corbu’s much photographed architectural work may not know that he was something of a shutterbug himself. According to the publisher, he not only “harnessed the power of the photographic image to define and disseminate his persona, his ideas and buildings,” but his influence on the medium led to the rise of photography in general. From another perspective the book provides a more intimate way to access Le Corbusier’s creative process and some of the surprising inspirations behind his work, including images of him in his preferred office attire—his birthday suit.

More images after the jump.

Figment 2013 Brings a Cloud of 50,000 Plastic Bottles to Governors Island

East
Monday, November 19, 2012
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Head in the Clouds pavilion by Studio Klimoski Chang Architects. (Courtesy Figment)

Head in the Clouds pavilion by Studio Klimoski Chang Architects. (Courtesy Figment)

Each year, the AIANY’s Emerging New York Architect (ENYA) committee and the Structural Engineers Association of New York bring a whimsical, wondrous, and often absurd pavilion to New York’s Governors Island as part of the FIGMENT Festival. This year, FIGMENT held a design competition and 200 designers submitted proposals. The newly announced City of Dreams Competition winner for 2013 is Brooklyn-based Studio Klimoski Chang Architects and their sustainably-minded Head in the Clouds pavilion, comprised of metal rods, and thousands of plastic milk jugs and water bottles.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architects and Scientists Debate How to Prepare a Post-Sandy New York Region

East
Monday, November 19, 2012
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Panelists engaged in conversation about design strategies for the city after Hurricane Sandy at the Center for Architecture (Courtesy AIANY)

Panelists engaged in conversation about design strategies for the city after Hurricane Sandy at the Center for Architecture (Courtesy AIANY)

Barriers or freshwater wetlands? New building codes? What about porous pavements or floating city blocks? These were just a few of the ideas batted around at AIANY’s discussion and fundraiser, “Designing the City after Superstorm Sandy,” at the Center for Architecture last Thursday evening. The panel, moderated by Michael Kimmelman, architecture critic for The New York Times, consisted of the city’s leading designers, architects, scientists, and government officials. While each panelist came to the conversation with a different approach and set of strategies, all agreed that change is necessary and new solutions urgent.

“There’s a certain consensus about taking steps in the long-run,” said Kimmelman.

Continue reading after the jump.

Massive Fire Engulfs 34-Story Dubai Condo Tower

International
Monday, November 19, 2012
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Early Saturday morning, a 34-story residential tower in Dubai burst into flames running its entire height. The 160-unit Tamweel Tower, located in a complex of towers known as the Jumeirah Lakes Towers, caught fire at 2:30a.m. local time, sending hundreds of residents into the streets to seek refuge in a nearby park. The cause of the fire has not yet been determined, but The National reported that some believe the fire may have started near the roof and propelled down the tower by the building’s flammable cladding material, a similar phenomenon as what happened to Rem Koolhaas’ CCTV tower in China a few years ago when fireworks sparked a major blaze on the under-construction tower and the nearby 40-story Al Tayer Tower that caught fire earlier this year.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Daniel Libeskind Adds Three Intersecting Cubes to the Jewish Museum Berlin

International
Friday, November 16, 2012
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(Courtesy Academy of the Jewish Museum Berlin)

(Courtesy Academy of the Jewish Museum Berlin)

Daniel Libeskind’s second contribution to the Jewish Museum Berlin since 2001, the Academy of the Jewish Museum Berlin, will open this Saturday, November 17. The 25,000 square foot Academy is located just across from the original museum and now houses the museum library, a growing archive, and will also house lectures, workshops, and seminars.

Continue reading after the jump.

“Future Prentice” Proposals Imagine Reuse for Threatened Chicago Icon

Midwest
Friday, November 16, 2012
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The Buildings are sleeping, you should go and wake them up, she says. (Cyril Marsollier and Wallo Villacorta)

The Buildings are sleeping, you should go and wake them up, she says. (Cyril Marsollier and Wallo Villacorta)

On the heels of a surprising, if tenuous, victory in court, preservationists gathered Thursday evening at the Chicago Architecture Foundation to celebrate the opening of Reconsidering an Icon: Creative Conversations About Prentice Women’s Hospital, an exhibition that showcases re-use proposals for Bertrand Goldberg’s threatened icon.

Some of the 71 ideas presented addressed Northwestern University’s stipulations for high-density wet-lab research space on the site, while some imagined other uses for the cloverleaf tower and its blocky podium.

Continue reading after the jump.

Wright or Wrong? Debate over Massaro House Authenticity Rekindled

East
Friday, November 16, 2012
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Frank Lloyd Wright's Massaro House. (Ahalife)

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Massaro House. (Ahalife)

The story goes like this: In 1949 an engineer named A.K. Chahroudi commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home on Petra Island in Lake Mahopac, New York, which Chahroudi owned. But the $50,000 price tag on the 5,000 square foot house was more than Chahroudi could afford, so Wright designed him a smaller, more affordable cottage elsewhere on the island.

Fast forward to 1996 when Joseph Massaro, a sheet metal contractor, bought the island for $700,000, a sale that also included Wright’s original yet unfinished plans. Though he says he only intended to spruce up the existing cottage and not build anything new, one can hardly fault Massaro for wanting to follow through on a home Wright once said would eclipse Falling Water. In 2000 Massaro sold his business and hired Thomas A. Heinz, an architect and Wright historian, to complete and update the design, a move that incensed the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, who promptly sued him, stating he couldn’t claim the house was a true Wright, but was only “inspired” by him.

Continue reading after the jump.

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