Abandoned Power Plant on the Hudson River to Become Hotel, Convention Center

East, Newsletter
Monday, January 21, 2013
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Glenwood Power Plant in Yonkers. (June Marie / Flickr)

Glenwood Power Plant in Yonkers. (June Marie / Flickr)

It has been nearly five decades since the Glenwood Power Plant in Yonkers, New York closed its doors, but developer Ron Shemesh has plans to transform this four-building complex on the Hudson into a hotel and convention center. The Wall Street Journal reported that Mr. Shemesh, a plastics manufacturer from the area, bought the property from investor Ken Capolino for $3 million. The project will be costly, however. Mr. Shemesh will need to raise around $155 million to redevelop the plant. In December, the Mid-Hudson Economic Development Council gave Mr. Shemesh a small economic boost with a $1 million grant to preserve the sprawling complex.

A few photos of the interior after the jump.

Manhattan West’s Railyard-Spanning Platform Breaks Ground

East
Monday, January 21, 2013
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Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)

Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)

Manhattan’s far west side is about to become one of the busiest construction sites in the country. Last Tuesday morning, officials gathered at the corner of 9th Avenue and West 33rd Street to celebrate the second major groundbreaking in the Hudson Yards District, Brookfield Properties’ trio of new SOM-designed towers comprising the Manhattan West development to be built over a large rail yard serving Penn Station. The $4.5 billion project’s first phase, construction of the north portion of the railroad-spanning platform that will eventually support development, is now underway, and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg speculated that the second half of the platform could be underway in coming months. Excavation has been ongoing since the fall of 2012.

Continue reading after the jump.

Utile Makes a Splash With Digitally Fabricated Pavilion in Boston

Fabrikator
Friday, January 18, 2013
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Boston Harbor Islands Pavilion. (Chuck Choi)

Boston Harbor Islands Pavilion. (Chuck Choi)

The Boston Harbor Islands Pavilion roof channels rainwater for irrigation on the Rose Kennedy Greenway.

Jump on a ferry in Downtown Boston and in twenty minutes, you’ll arrive at the Boston Harbor Islands, an archipelago of 34 islands dotting Boston Harbor managed by the National Park Service. To entice city-dwellers to make the trip, Boston-based Utile Architecture + Planning has designed a composite steel and concrete pavilion with a digitally fabricated roof for the National Park Service and the Boston Harbor Island Alliance to provide travel information and history about the Islands and a shady respite atop the highway-capping Rose Kennedy Greenway.

Two thin overlapping concrete canopy slabs supported by delicate steel beams provide a sculptural shelter. Utile digitally designed the $4.2 million Boston Harbor Islands Pavilion using Rhino to respond to the surrounding cityscape and serve as a playful rainwater-harvesting system to irrigate the Greenway’s landscape.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gallery> AIA Honor Awards 2013 – Architecture

National
Thursday, January 17, 2013
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Centra Metropark (Courtesy of Michael Moran/OTTO)

Centra Metropark (Courtesy of Michael Moran/OTTO)

[Editor's Note: This the first in a three-part series documenting the winners of the AIA 2013 Honor Awards, which are broken down into three categories: architecture, interiors, and urban design. This list covers the architecture awards, but additional segments spotlight winners in interior architecture and urban design.]

The American Institute of Architects has announced the 2013 recipients of the Institute Honor Awards for Architecture. The list is comprised of a range of projects from across the country, including the new building housing The Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, a centralized operations facility for Mason Lane Farm in Kentucky, the exterior restoration of The New York Public Library, and the Vancouver Convention Center.

The eight-person jury that selected this year’s AIA Architecture Honor Award winners included: Mary Katherine Lanzillotta, Hartman-Cox Architects; Brian Fitzsimmons, Fitzsimmons Architects; John Kane, Architekton; William Leddy, Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects; Philip Loheed, BTA Architects; Robert Maschke, robert maschke ARCHITECTS; Douglas L. Milburn, Isaksen Glerum Wachter; and Becky Joyce Yannes, Drexel University.

The AIA will honor the recipients at the AIA 2013 National Convention and Design Exposition in Denver in late June.

See all the winners after the jump.

Renzo Piano’s Menil Collection Wins AIA Twenty-Five Year Award

National, Newsletter
Wednesday, January 16, 2013
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Renzo Piano's Menil Collection. (Paul Hester)

Renzo Piano’s Menil Collection. (Paul Hester)

The Menil Collection in Houston, Texas, has been honored with the 2013 AIA Twenty-Five Year Award. Renzo Piano designed the museum to house Dominique de Menil’s impressive collection of primitive African art and modern surrealist art in the heart of a residential neighborhood. The design respected Ms. de Menil’s wish to make the museum appear “large from the inside and small from the outside” and to ensure the works could be viewed under natural lighting.

More photos and drawings after the jump.

Kickstarting Greenpoint: Crowd-Funding Site Begins Office Renovation in Brooklyn

East
Monday, January 14, 2013
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A rendering of Kickstarter's new Brooklyn Headquarters (Courtesy of Ole Sondresen Architect)

A rendering of Kickstarter’s new Brooklyn headquarters (Courtesy of Ole Sondresen Architect)

Brooklyn has increasingly become home to a number of internet start-ups, and now the crowd-funding site, Kickstarter, is the most recent one to put  roots down in the borough. Greenpointers reported today that Kickstarter has already started construction on its new 29,000-sq-ft headquarters at the former Eberhard Faber Pencil Co. Factory in Greenpoint.

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New York City Breaks Ground on High Bridge Restoration

East
Friday, January 11, 2013
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(Courtesy New Yorkers for Parks)

(Courtesy New Yorkers for Parks)

Officials broke ground today on the long anticipated restoration of New York’s High Bridge connecting the Bronx with Manhattan. Built in 1848 and today the city’s oldest bridge, the 1,200-foot-long span had long been a popular strolling bridge, even making an appearance in Edith Wharton’s 1913 novel Custom of the Country. The landmarked bridge was closed to the public in the 1970s, but after construction wraps up on the $61 million rehabilitation, strolling New Yorkers and bicyclists can once again cross high above the Harlem River—116 feet—and connect with the city’s growing waterfront Greenway. (See also: Photos of High Bridge before renovation.)

Improvements include pedestrian safety measures like accessibility ramps, viewing platforms, and new lighting. An eight-foot-tall cable mesh fence to prevent jumpers and throwing trash will also line each side, a point that drew criticism from some in the community who believe it’s unnecessary and will spoil views. In a statement released at the groundbreaking ceremony, Mayor Michael Bloomberg called High Bridge “one of our city’s great treasures.” He continued, “It will bring people here from all over the five boroughs, and even all over the world, to see some of the most spectacular views in the city.”

A Battle Lost for Neutra’s Gettsyburg Cyclorama Building

East
Friday, January 11, 2013
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Photograph of Richard Neutra's Gettysburg cyclorama building. (Lawrence S. Williams Photography/Courtesy Docomomo)

Photograph of Richard Neutra’s Gettysburg cyclorama building. (Lawrence S. Williams Photography/Courtesy Docomomo)

After years of litigation, preservationists have lost the battle to save Richard Neutra’s Gettysburg cyclorama building, an iconic example of modern architecture from the 1960s. The bulldozers could raze this circular visitor center as early as February, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported. The National Park Service commissioned the glass and concrete building as part of its Mission 66 initiative—a billion-dollar program to update park services across the country—at the Gettysburg Battlefield site.  The rotunda was designed specifically to house the 1883 panoramic painting of the Battle of Gettysburg by Paul Philippoteaux.

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Aurora Borealis-Inspired Lighting Display to Fill the World Financial Center Winter Garden

East
Friday, January 11, 2013
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Rendering of LightCycles at the World Financial Center. (Courtesy Brookfield Properties)

Rendering of Light Cycles at the World Financial Center. (Courtesy Brookfield Properties)

Beginning on January 22, Pelli Clarke Pelli’s glass Winter Garden at Manhattan’s World Financial Center will be twinkling with strands of LED lights. Lighting artist and theater designer Anne Militello designed the Light Cycles installation, inspired by the jewel-tone color of lights found in nature such as the Aurora Borealis. LED lights will be attached to strings of mirrored discs hanging from the ten-story barrel-vaulted ceiling. The lights will feature “shifting movements and patterns” programmed by the artist. According to the World Financial Center, “Like charms on a bracelet, the jeweled discs entrance through a softly evolving manipulation of color and texture.” The installation runs through March 30, 2013.

Photo of the Day: Central Park Aerial Panorama

East
Friday, January 11, 2013
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(Courtesy AirPano)

(Courtesy AirPano)

We’ve all become accustomed to seeing aerial photography from apps like Google Maps, but this aerial panorama by Russian photographer Sergey Semonov presents Manhattan’s Central Park and its surrounding cityscape with fascinating new detail. The Atlantic found the image, submitted as part of the Epson International Photographic Pano Awards. Created in collaboration with aerial-panorama-makers AirPano, the team photographed the park from a helicopter and later stitched the various images together creating the unique, albeit slightly distorted, view of the city.

Defrosting A Construction Site: Beautiful Ice Crystals Inside a Chicago Adaptive Reuse Project

Midwest, Newsletter
Friday, January 11, 2013
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(Gary R. Jensen/Courtesy Sterling Bay Companies)

(Gary R. Jensen/Courtesy Sterling Bay Companies)

Perkins+Will is designing one cool corporate headquarters for bike components manufacturer, SRAM, in Chicago’s Fulton Market District. Located inside the 1K Fulton development by the Sterling Bay Companies, an adaptive reuse of a ten-story cold storage warehouse, two floors of offices will include bleacher seating for group meetings, a product development shop, and even an interior cycling test track. But before construction could begin, there was one small problem most architects rarely encounter: the construction site needed to be defrosted after essentially serving as a building-size refrigerator since 1923.

Continue reading after the jump.

Climate Responsive Pavilion Uses Laminated Metal to “Bloom” in the Sun

Fabrikator
Friday, January 11, 2013
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The 20-foot-high installation only weighs 500 pounds. (courtesy TK)

The 20-foot-high installation only weighs 500 pounds. (courtesy Brandon Shigeta)

Made from approximately 14,000 pieces, Bloom is the first architectural application of a laminated metal material that includes nickel and manganese with a bit of iron.

Architecture has long been valued for its static nature and sense of permanence. Increasingly, however, architects are working to make buildings more responsive to their users and to the climate. Often this is accomplished through mechanical means, but architect Doris Kim Sung, principal of LA-based DOSU studio architecture, is looking at how building materials themselves can be responsive, integrating changeability into the structure itself.

The dramatic shell-like form of her recent pavilion, called Bloom, suggests, at first glance, that Sung is interested in cutting-edge digital design. While this is certainly the case, Bloom’s true innovation happens more slowly, through the bending of its metal panels according to heat levels generated by the sun.

Read More

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