Welcome to Staten Eye-Land: World’s Tallest Ferris Wheel to Anchor New Waterfront Development

East
Thursday, September 27, 2012
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The planned New York Wheel development includes the world's tallest Ferris wheel. (Courtesy NYC Mayor's Office)

The planned New York Wheel development includes the world’s tallest Ferris wheel. (Courtesy NYC Mayor’s Office)

Today, thousands of tourists and New Yorkers make a loop on the Staten Island Ferry between the borough and Manhattan, but as soon as 2016, they will also be able to make a vertical loop on the world’s tallest Ferris wheel, anchoring a new mixed-use project on the North Shore waterfront in St. George. Mayor Bloomberg today unveiled plans for Harbor Commons, which includes 350,000 square feet of retail space for 100 outlet mall stores, a 200-room, 120,000 square foot hotel, and a massive green-roofed parking structure, but all eyes were on the project’s neighbor; the 625-foot-tall New York Wheel will offer stunning views of New York City and its Harbor to an estimated 4.5 million people per year.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Commission Slams AEG’s LA Convention Center Plans

West
Thursday, September 27, 2012
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The Convention Center is designed to bridge over LA’s Pico Boulevard (AEG, Populous)

LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s “Vision Team,” a group of eight architects consulting on the city’s planned football stadium and convention center expansion have issued a damning report on the latter project, reports the LA Daily News. The center is being designed by Populous and developed by AEG. “This is not good city design,” Norman Millar, dean of Woodbury University School of Architecture, and a Vision Team member, told the Daily News this week. Among the team’s complaints, they worry about having visitors enter the new hall through a dark passage created by bridging the building over Pico Boulevard. The team also frets about possible fumes under the tunnel, the configuration of the center’s huge ballroom, and the amount of natural light that would enter the building. The Vision Team also includes Hitoshi Abe, chairman of Architecture & Urban Design at UCLA; Scott Johnson of Johnson Fain; Joseph Coriaty, a partner at Frederick Fisher and Partner; and Paul Danna, principal at SOM. The group has met at least three times. Villaraigosa’s spokesman Peter Sanders told the Daily News that the mayor knew about the Vision Team’s concerns. “We believe we have the best plan given the constraints that exist,” Sanders wrote.  The project’s EIR goes before LA City Council tomorrow.  Read More

Bloomingdale Trail Plans Come Into Focus With New Renderings

Midwest
Tuesday, September 25, 2012
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Proposed view of Milwaukee Avenue Bridge and Overlook Stair. (Courtesy Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates)

Proposed view of Milwaukee Avenue Bridge and Overlook Stair. (Courtesy Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates)

Last night, updated plans for Chicago’s Bloomingdale Trail were presented at a public meeting—the public session’s last chance to comment on the design before final plans are presented this December. The trail is an elevated linear park designed by a team including Collins Engineers, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, and Frances Whitehead on a former rail viaduct running through Chicago.

AN contributor and sustainable transit enthusiast Steven Vance attended the meeting at the Humboldt Park Field House, recapping the event on the GRID Chicago blog. Among the details confirmed at the meeting, construction is set to begin summer 2013. While the trail will open for bikers and pedestrians in Fall 2014, landscaping and art installations will continue into 2015.

View a slideshow of new images after the jump.

Unveiled> MVRDV Designs a City of Flowers in the Netherlands

International
Monday, September 24, 2012
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(Courtesy MVRDV)

(Courtesy MVRDV)

A fantastical sounding urban garden paradise imagined by Rotterdam-based MVRDV and made up of jasmine hotels, lily pond swimming pools, offices decked with planted interiors and bamboo parks, and an alphabetized plant library will be brought to reality over the next ten years in the city of Almere, Netherlands. Today, the Nederlandse Tuinbouwraad (NTR) chose MVRDV’s plan for Almere as the winner of the esteemed Floriade 2022 World Horticulture Expo, which takes place only once every ten years. The blanket of new city fabric draped over a 111-acre peninsula will transform it into a permanent green extension directly opposite Almere’s existing city center.

Continue reading after the jump.

Slideshow> New Renderings of Rufus, Amazon’s Seattle Campus

West
Monday, September 24, 2012
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Aerial View Looking South and West (NBBJ)

Aerial View Looking South and West (NBBJ)

Since AN first looked at the proposed design for Amazon’s three-tower complex in the Denny Triangle neighborhood in Seattle last May—and after feedback from the Seattle community and meetings with the Design Review Board over the summer—NBBJ has released new renderings. And the project now has a nickname—Rufus—a nod to the late “Amazon dog,” a Corgi who kept employees company in the office since the early days.

In response to recommendations, the evolved design includes updates to elevations, details along the lower stories, weather protection, and open spaces. Facades are asymmetrical, stepped, and diverse. In a skin study, the office tower on the southeast Block 14 sports a façade of operable windows, glass, pre-finished metal panels and gold accent trim, which connects to the neighboring meeting center via a sky-bridge. Other perspectives reveal glass curtain walls on the six-story meeting center, leaving the auditorium and stairwell exposed. On Block 19, to the southwest, a covered walkway would provide protection during Seattle’s rainy winter months. There are retail storefronts on the lower levels, which will augment the outdoor public parks and plazas.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Discover the Landscape Architecture of Washington D.C.

East
Friday, September 21, 2012
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Meridian Hill (Malcom X) Park  (Photo Credit: Glenn LaRue Smith, ASLA)

Meridian Hill (Malcom X) Park (Photo Credit: Glenn LaRue Smith, ASLA)

Washington, D.C., is often admired for its monuments. Now there is another part of our nation’s capital that its 19 million annual visitors can tour and enjoy. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has recently announced the launch of an online mobile-friendly guide meant to give not only tourist, but also locals a new perspective on the historic, modern, and contemporary landscapes in Washington, D.C. and Arlington, VA.

Read More

Fluid Walls Show Off Concrete’s Seductive Side

Fabrikator
Friday, September 21, 2012
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Selvika

National Tourist Route Rv 889 Havøysund in northern Norway by Reiulf Ramstad Architects

Two new projects prove that concrete’s rigidity is no longer set in stone

From Peter Eisenman’s Berlin Holocaust Memorial to Paul Rudolph’s Art and Architecture building, concrete has been used with finesse in minimalist and brutalist structures and, as such, is mostly thought of as cold or aggressive. Two recent projects in Portugal and Norway are set to change our hard-edged opinion of concrete and show that it can be as fluid as a ribbon waving in the wind. Casa Xieira II, a private home in Leiria, Portugal, designed by A2 + Arquitectos, and the National Tourist Route Rv 889 Havøysund in northern Norway by Reiulf Ramstad Architects both feature winding concrete wrappers that stand out in sharp contrast to their surroundings, a factor that only becomes more important when your primary building material is as stark as concrete. Read More

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Oyler Wu, Take 2

West
Thursday, September 20, 2012
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Oyler Wu’s torqued steel shells shelter guests at the SCI-Arc Graduation. (Scott Mayoral)

Last year we showcased Oyler Wu’s SCI-Arc graduation pavilion, a swooping steel, fabric, and rope construction that floated above the event like a billowing sail. For last week’s graduation the firm added a small addition while making significant improvements. The addition, which sat school directors and special guests, became a stage for diploma presentation. Made of a torqued steel shell fitted with twisting fabric (Wu calls it a three dimensional twist), the addition is no replication: it creates a simpler, more unified complement to the original, which involves a more complex web of fabric and roping. As for the original pavilion, they replaced its (disturbingly) dirty fabric with darker material and re-oriented the whole thing toward the school itself. Next year’s pavilion will be designed by Marcelo Spina. We can’t wait.

Read More

Zaha to Take Parametric Design a Step Further at SCI-Arc

Newsletter, West
Friday, September 14, 2012
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Rendering of Zaha Hadid's Pleated Shell Structures installation at SCI-Arc. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid)

Rendering of Zaha Hadid’s Pleated Shell Structures installation at SCI-Arc. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid)

Prepare yourselves Angelenos: Zaha is coming to town. Her installation Pleated Shell Structures will be on display at the SCI-Arc gallery beginning October 12. The installation’s details are still limited, but it appears that it will further push Hadid’s and partner Patrik Schumacher’s legendary experimentation with parametric design, giving smooth forms a more tactile, imbedded surface. So if parametric design is 3D, could this be 4D? Which dimension are we in now, anyway?

Unveiled> Abu Dhabi’s Second CBD?

Midwest, Newsletter
Friday, September 14, 2012
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(Courtesy Goettsch Partners)

Goettsch Partners designed the Al Hilal bank flagship office tower for a new business district planned in Abu Dhabi. (Courtesy Goettsch Partners)

Abu Dhabi’s dizzying building boom slowed down somewhat after the 2008 financial collapse dried up the liquidity that inspires big projects. The damage appears not to have been permanent, however, as the UAE capital will forge ahead with a 24-story speculative office tower—part of a new central business district on Al Maryah Island.

Continue reading after the jump.

Oscar Niemeyer’s Buildings As Never Seen Before

East, Newsletter
Friday, September 14, 2012
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Cathedral of Brasilia. (Vicente de Paulo/Courtesy Paddle 8)

Cathedral of Brasilia. (Vicente de Paulo/Courtesy Paddle 8)

Grab your 3D glasses, the artists at Visionaire, an art and fashion publisher, have added dramatic new depth to architectural photography. The work of Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer, who brought Modern design to Sao Paolo, Brasilia, and Rio de Janeiro, has now been optimized for viewing through stereoscope lenses. Just as Niemeyer innovated architectural design, making soft, delicate curves out of his concrete buildings, the international team of artists at Visionaire are advancing stereoscopic design and traditional ways of viewing cities, neatly packaging 3D scenes of modern Brazil against Niemeyer’s landscape into lenticular cases featuring the art of Fernando and Humberto Campana and Beatriz Milhazes on its exterior.

Read More

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E/B Office Transforms 300 IKEA Chairs Into Soaring Pavilion

Fabrikator
Friday, September 14, 2012
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Reimagining the chair as an architectural material

With their focus on “environmental acuity and a critical digital ethic,” Brian Bush and Yong Ju Lee of E/B Office describe themselves as “digital architects” who design “real projects that are virtually indistinguishable from their digital visions.” Their most recent vision included 300 of IKEA’s pine wood Ivar chairs arching through the air across the wide lawn at Freedom Park in Atlanta, where SEAT was installed earlier this summer for Flux Projects, a public art organization. Bush and Lee hope that SEAT will encourage people to reconsider the chair as more than just a passive, everyday object, but as an architectural structure in and of itself. Indeed, sitting amongst a swooping pavilion built entirely out of chairs, it would be difficult not to.

No doubt you’ve seen the Ivar chair before, or something like it. Popular for its low price ($24.99) and ability to be painted any color, Ivar is so basic it’s the kind of chair that should pop right up when you do a Google Image search for “chair” (it doesn’t, though IKEA’s Poang does). Because they came from IKEA, all 300 were assembled by hand by Bush, Lee and a team of 15. The chairs were unaltered except for the seat, which was removed from most to make them easier to connect. After Bush and Lee made a 3D model in Rhino with the help of a structural engineer, they launched right into building the full-scale version onsite.  Read More

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