Wright or Wrong? Debate over Massaro House Authenticity Rekindled

East
Friday, November 16, 2012
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Frank Lloyd Wright's Massaro House. (Ahalife)

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Massaro House. (Ahalife)

The story goes like this: In 1949 an engineer named A.K. Chahroudi commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home on Petra Island in Lake Mahopac, New York, which Chahroudi owned. But the $50,000 price tag on the 5,000 square foot house was more than Chahroudi could afford, so Wright designed him a smaller, more affordable cottage elsewhere on the island.

Fast forward to 1996 when Joseph Massaro, a sheet metal contractor, bought the island for $700,000, a sale that also included Wright’s original yet unfinished plans. Though he says he only intended to spruce up the existing cottage and not build anything new, one can hardly fault Massaro for wanting to follow through on a home Wright once said would eclipse Falling Water. In 2000 Massaro sold his business and hired Thomas A. Heinz, an architect and Wright historian, to complete and update the design, a move that incensed the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, who promptly sued him, stating he couldn’t claim the house was a true Wright, but was only “inspired” by him.

Continue reading after the jump.

LEAD’s “Golden Moon” Shines Over Hong Kong

Fabrikator
Friday, November 16, 2012
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LEAD's "Golden Moon"

LEAD’s “Golden Moon”

Digital design meets traditional Chinese craftsmanship in a pavilion constructed like a paper lantern

Hong Kong-based architects Kristof Crolla (LEAD) and Adam Fingrut (Zaha Hadid) married traditional Chinese craftsmanship and digital design technology in their temporary pavilion, Golden Moon, which won the Gold Award in the Mid-Autumn Festival Lantern Wonderland last month. The 60-foot-tall structure was built in just 11 days atop a reflection pool in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park, proof that “complex geometry can be built at high speed and low cost with the simplest of means,” said Crolla and Fingrut, who sought to rethink digital design by “anchoring the paradigm in a strong materiality.”

Read More

Zaha Hadid Triumphs in New National Stadium Japan Competition

International
Thursday, November 15, 2012
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Zaha Hadid's winning stadium proposal. (Courtesy Japan Sport Council)

Zaha Hadid’s winning stadium proposal. (Courtesy Japan Sport Council)

Zaha Hadid wins again! Following a star-studded design competition, the Japanese Sports Council has announced Hadid as the winner of the New National Stadium in Japan, beating out Toyo Ito, SANAA, Populous, UN Studio among others and taking home a $250,000 prize. All-star designer of London’s 2012 Aquatics Center for the summer Olympics and the first female to ever win the Pritzker Architecture prize, Hadid continues her legacy with this new stadium in Tokyo. Estimated to cost around $1.6 billion, the venue will seat 80,000 visitors and sport a retractable roof.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City Council Approves Mega Expansion at Chelsea Market

East
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
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Proposed plans for Chelse Market. (Courtesy Jamestown)

Proposed plans for Chelse Market along 10th Avenue. (Courtesy Jamestown)

In spite of angry protests from neighborhood advocates and preservation groups, New York City Council unanimously approved plans Tuesday afternoon to upzone Chelsea Market. The developer, Jamestown Properties, intends on building 300,000-square-feet of office space designed by Studios Architecture that will sit right on top of current Chelsea Market. To move things along in their favor, Jamestown had agreed to give around $12 million to the High Line and $5 million to a fund to build affordable housing, in addition to another $1 million to help launch an internship program at the nearby Fulton Houses.

Continue reading after the jump.

Toronto Bikers Revolt Against Mayor’s Attempts to Remove Bike Lanes

International
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
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Protesting bike lane removal in Toronto. (Shawn Micallef/Spacing Toronto)

Protesting bike lane removal in Toronto. (Shawn Micallef/Spacing Toronto)

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has proven to be a controversial public figure, whether it’s unsafe reading while driving, or now, removing Toronto’s recently installed bike lanes on Jarvis Street.  Yesterday, city crews showed up in large scrubbing trucks to scrape away thin dividing lines from the street, only to encounter a small collection of riders who would not stand by idly. Instead the cyclists chose to lie down, sit, and ultimately blockade the street scrubbing vehicles, eventually forcing them to leave for the day.

But the bike lane removal protests picked up again today.

New Balance to Build Commuter Rail Station as Part of Boston Headquarters Expansion

East
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
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New Brighton Landing by Elkus Manfredi Architects and Howard/Stein Hudson Associates. (Courtesy Elkus Manfredi)

New Brighton Landing by Elkus Manfredi Architects and Howard/Stein Hudson Associates. (Courtesy Elkus Manfredi)

It has been five decades since there has been a commuter rail station in Brighton, but this will soon change. MassDOT Secretary Richard A. Davey and New Balance Chairman James S. Davis announced this summer that they will build a new Worcester Line commuter station, and just a few days ago, the sports apparel company gave word that it is slated to open in 2014.

Continue reading after the jump.

PRODUCT> Boardwalk Bench Uses NY’s History To Fund Its Future

Product
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
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BoardwalkBench

Boardwalk Bench by Forms+Surfaces

For the Boardwalk Bench, the latest addition to its product line, Forms+Surfaces sourced 142-year-old reclaimed FSC-certified Cumaru hardwood from the original slats of the Atlantic City Boardwalk. The naturally oiled slats are arranged in an asymmetrical pattern to salvage as much wood as possible while trimming imperfections.

Right now all proceeds from the sales of the Boardwalk Bench go to the Red Cross for Sandy relief efforts. Read More

Architects Build A Times Square Pavilion to Promote Dialogue for Veterans Day

East, Newsletter
Monday, November 12, 2012
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Matter's "Peace & Quiet" installation in Times Square. (Courtesy Times Square Alliance)

Matter’s “Peace & Quiet” installation in Times Square. (Ka-Man Tse / Courtesy Times Square Alliance)

Opening today for Veterans Day, a new pavilion designed by Brooklyn-based Matter Architecture Practice aims to bring a little Peace and Quiet to the hectic liveliness of Times Square. The new temporary pavilion, built yesterday and set to remain standing through November 16 is described as a “dialogue station” by its architects. “It is a tranquil place to meet, share stories, leave a note, shake hands, or meet a veteran in person,” Matter continues on its website. Times Square “seemed the ideal circumstance (or mad challenge) to initiate and inform a poignant exchange of ideas, to will intimacy in an instance of its opposite.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Sandy Snuffs Out Century Old Lighthouse near Staten Island

East
Friday, November 9, 2012
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The Old Orchard Shoal Lighthouse before and after Hurricane Sandy. (Courtesy US Coast Guard)

The Old Orchard Shoal Lighthouse before and after Hurricane Sandy. (Courtesy US Coast Guard)

Staten Island’s Old Orchard Shoals Lighthouse stood as a protective beacon in Sandy Hook Bat for 119 years, but has now been reduced to rubble atop its rocky outcropping after being slammed by Hurricane Sandy. Built in 1893, the cast-iron lighthouse once stood 51 feet tall and had been listed on the National Park Service’s Maritime Heritage Program, but had been declared obsolete by the General Service Administration and sold at auction in 2008 for $235,000. The US Coast Guard confirmed this week that the stout structure succumbed to the storm. Light House Friends has more history on the Old Orchard Shoals Lighthouse:

In the late 1800s when winter ice closed down Staten Island Sound, the waterway separating New Jersey from Staten Island, an estimated 15,000 tons of shipping were forced to use the narrow channel that ran along the eastern shore of Staten Island. In doing so, the vessels passed dangerously close to Old Orchard Shoal. A bell buoy and a lighted buoy initially marked this shallow area, but mariners considered these navigational aids grossly inadequate…After $60,000 was approved, construction of the lighthouse was completed in 1893. The new fifty-one-foot, cast-iron tower was cone-shaped, built in the “spark plug” style common among offshore lights in that region.

[Via SI Live and Working Harbor.]

More images of the destruction after the jump.

Design Museum London Calls For Thrifty Fabrication With “Unlimited Edition”

Fabrikator
Friday, November 9, 2012
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LawrenceLek

“Unlimited Edition,” by Lawrence Lek

Making a strong, modular and architecturally significant pavilion on pocket change

For the Designers in Residence exhibition, Design Museum London asked four teams to respond to a brief entitled “Thrift.”  The four resulting projects address the notion that “the limitations of economy require more resourceful, inspired and intelligent use of materials and process” and that the constraints of thrift ultimately lead to “a more creative and fully resolved outcome” than a project with limitless resources.

One of the four chosen proposals came from Lawrence Lek, an architect and sculptor who worked with Ken Yeang in Malaysia and Foster + Partners in London before founding his eponymous studio in 2011. For his project, “Unlimited Edition,” he reflected on how he has approached fabricating prototypes since completing his studies at the Architectural Association (AA) in 2008. “I remember a lot of students’ work, and mine especially, could be very extravagant with materials because being in school you have the luxury of many resources… One thing I found difficult just after leaving the academic world was actually fabricating prototypes.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Buckyball Lights Up Again in Madison Square Park

East, West
Thursday, November 8, 2012
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BUCKYBALL illuminated in blue (Photo Credit: James Ewing)

BUCKYBALL illuminated in blue (Photo Credit: James Ewing)

New York-based artist Leo Villareal is creatively illuminating the constructed form. In Madison Square Park, Villareal’s LED light-up geodesic dome, Buckyball, stands tall, undamaged but unlit after Hurricane Sandy. The Madison Square Park Conservancy told AN that the lights are expected to be back on tonight. And soon, Villareal also plans to light-up a far larger construction on the West coast: the San Francisco Bay Bridge.

Continue reading after the jump.

After Sandy: A Look Back at New York’s Worst Storm Ever

East
Wednesday, November 7, 2012
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While New York and the East Coast try to return to normal after the brutal Hurricane Sandy, AN takes a look at most dramatic storm-related sights as we batten down the hatches for the oncoming nor-easter. Our Lower Manhattan offices reopened on Monday with lights working but our steam-powered heat is still out (space heaters have been working overtime). Architecture for Humanity and AIA New York have already begun mobilizing the design community to help with the recovery effort, as have countless other organizations accepting donations and volunteers.

Check out the best photos and videos after the jump.

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