Andrew Geller’s 1958 Pearlroth House Undergoing Restoration

Other
Tuesday, June 25, 2013
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pearlroth

Andrew Geller’s Pearl Roth House (1958) (Image Courtesy of Jake Gorst)

Andrew Geller‘s infamous Pearlroth House, a uniquely designed beach residence located on Dune Road in Westhampton Beach, New York, is undergoing a significant restoration. The task is being carried out by Richard Reinhardt of Reinhardt/O’Brien Contracting and is being supervised by architect Rick Cook, of Cook + Fox Architects, owners Jonathan Pearlroth and Holly Posner, and Andrew Geller’s grandson, Jake Gorst. The one-of-a-kind house was originally built in 1958 for Arthur Pearlroth, an executive for the New York Port Authority, who once had a reputation for being a “lady’s man,” but Gellar collaborated more closely on its actual design with Pearlroth’s wife, Mitch. The couple commissioned Gellar, who often drafted his designs only after carefully studying the projected site and the family’s living habits, to design a summer house that didn’t resemble their ordinary four-walled New York City apartment. The clever design has come to be referred to colloquially as the “square brassiere.”

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Winning “Cellular Complexity” Installation Design Twists the Limits of Architecture

Newsletter, West
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Rendering and model of Cellular Complexity. (Courtesy Julia Koerner, Marie Boltenstern, and Kais Al-Rawi)

Rendering and model of Cellular Complexity. (Courtesy Julia Koerner, Marie Boltenstern, and Kais Al-Rawi)

AIA Los Angeles has announced that UCLA SUPRASTUDIO lecturer Julia Koerner’s proposal Cellular Complexity is the winning entry for the 11th annual 2×8 Student Exhibition, a scholarship organization that has showcased projects of over 150 students from more than 15 architecture and design schools in California. This year’s winning scheme, in collaboration with Paris-based architect Marie Boltenstern and architect Kais Al-Rawi, presents a parametric pavilion of twisting planes that transitions in porosity from one end to the other. According to the AIA|LA, the jury appreciated the design concept’s creativity and edginess. The installation and exhibition of student work is expected to be complete by February 2014.

More images after the jump.

LAX is Really Getting There: Fentress Opens Major Terminal Expansion

West
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Inside the Tom Bradley Terminal's new Great Hall (Sam Lubell/ AN)

Inside the Tom Bradley Terminal’s new Great Hall (Sam Lubell/ AN)

Don’t look now, but LAX—the airport everyone loves to hate—is starting to complete its major makeover. The biggest change is the brand new $1.9 billion (yes, billion) addition to the Tom Bradley International Terminal, designed by Fentress Architects and unveiled in 2008. Its curving roofline, emulating waves breaking on the nearby beach, pops up behind the original Tom Bradley structure, which itself was recently renovated (for the cost of $723 million) by Leo A Daly.

Continue reading after the jump.

“Sky Reflector Net” Installed at Lower Manhattan’s Fulton Center

East, Newsletter
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Construction of the Sky Reflector-Net at the Fulton Center. (Patrick Cashin / Courtesy MTA)

Construction of the Sky Reflector-Net at the Fulton Center. (Patrick Cashin / Courtesy MTA)

Next year, when construction wraps up at the Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan, commuters will be gazing up, rather than around, at the station’s new artistic centerpiece—a curved, 79-foot-high reflective aluminum diamond web encased in a stainless-steel tracery. The showstopper will send ambient daylight into the mezzanines, passageways, and possibly even the platforms to help passengers orient themselves in the transportation hub.

At $2.1 million, Sky Reflector-Net, an artist/architect/engineer collaboration between James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), Grimshaw Architects, and Arup, is an integrated work created for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Arts for Transit and Urban Design and Metropolitan Transportation Authority Capital Construction (MTACC). It is the largest such work that the MTA has ever commissioned. Sky Reflector-Net seamlessly incorporates both functional and aesthetic goals. The piece was recently installed within the transit center building designed by Grimshaw Architects and Arup.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels Bests Koolhaas in First Vote for Miami Beach Convention Center

East
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Proposal for Miami Beach Convention Center (Courtesy of BIG)

Proposal for Miami Beach Convention Center (Courtesy of BIG)

In the last month, the competition for the Miami Beach Convention Center commission has morphed into an all out, gloves off, battle between two design teams, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and Rem Koolhaas’ OMA. The South Florida Business Journal has reported that the Miami Beach Convention Center Advisory Board chose the Portman CMC team—consisting of BIG, CMC Group, Portman Holdings, and West 8—over South Beach ACE in a 4-3 vote on June 18th. But this vote isn’t the deciding factor.

Next, the Miami Beach Commission will vote on the matter sometime before July 17th. Then it is up to residents to cast their vote for the stand alone convention center plan or the same plan with additional residential and commercial development tacked on.

View BIG’s renderings and a video after the jump.

Roman & Williams to Design Hotel in Landmark Chicago Athletic Association Building

Midwest
Friday, June 21, 2013
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The Chicago Athleltic Association Building. (C. William Brubaker / Courtesy UIC Digital Archives; Rolf Achilles / Courtesy Landmarks Illinois)

The Chicago Athleltic Association Building. (C. William Brubaker / Courtesy UIC Digital Archives; Rolf Achilles / Courtesy Landmarks Illinois)

The landmarked Chicago Athletic Association will soon be home to a boutique hotel designed by Roman and Williams, whose Ace Hotel in New York opened to acclaim in 2009.

Developed by AJ Capital Partners and Commune Hotels & Resorts, the 240-room hotel will include a large ballroom converted from the existing gym and running track, as well as a large greenhouse on the roof. The historic second-floor drawing room will serve as a “living room for a new generation,” Roman and Williams said in a statement, while a new sports room/pool hall/bar will call back to the Athletic Association’s past.

More after the jump.

The Denise Scott Brown Effect: AIA Revises Criteria for Gold Medal Award

National
Friday, June 21, 2013
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Rob Venturi and Denise Scott Brown

Rob Venturi and Denise Scott Brown.

The AIA Gold Medal Award is the highest honor an architect can receive from the American Institute of Architects. Until now, the award could only be presented to individual architects, but the AIA has just announced that as of January 1, 2014 this prestigious award will be open to an individual or two individuals who have equally collaborated on the design and execution of one distinguished architectural body of work that makes a lasting statement on the theory and practice of architecture.

Continue reading after the jump.

HUD Secretary Donovan Announces Kickoff of “Rebuild by Design” Competition

East
Friday, June 21, 2013
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Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey (Courtesy of spleeness/Flickr)

Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey (Courtesy of spleeness/Flickr)

Resiliency is a word that has become lodged in the vocabulary of nearly every lawmaker since Hurricane Sandy ravaged the east coast last October. And this month, government officials—on a local, state, and federal level—are taking steps to ensure that coastal cities are more resilient and rebuilt to better withstand natural disasters in the future.

Yesterday, at a panel discussion on Innovation & Resilience Design in Sandy Rebuilding at NYU, Shaun Donovan, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and Chair of the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force, announced the launch of a new regional design competition, “Rebuild by Design” seeking teams—made up of the top engineers, architects, landscape designers, and other experts—to propose projects that tackle issues such as climate, economic, and infrastructure (and as the press release states, “will actually be built”). These proposals can run the gamut from green infrastructure to residential retrofits.

Continue reading after the jump.

In 3D-Printed Sugar

Fabrikator
Friday, June 21, 2013
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Brought to you with support from:
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Fabrikator
Liz and Kyle Von Hasseln have developed a method to 3D print edible sugar.

Liz and Kyle Von Hasseln have developed a method to 3D print edible sugar. (courtesy Sugar Lab)

A team of SCI-Arc–trained architects establish a sweet set up in Southern California.

Liz and Kyle Von Hasseln wanted to bake a birthday cake for a friend but, unfortunately, their rented apartment didn’t have an oven. Not to be deterred, the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) alumni hit upon a solution that would leave most bakers scratching their heads: They decided to 3D print one.

Earlier that year, the couple had been awarded the school’s inaugural Gehry Prize for their work on Phantom Geometry, a 5-axis fabrication study of UV-cured resin within a shallow vat system that responded to real-time feed back and feed-forward mechanisms. “In our graduate work, we were really interested in the way free form fabrication would influence architecture,” Kyle recently told AN. “We thought a lot about the potential for the intersection of culture and technology that would be accessible to the public, so printing sugar was that.” Read More

An Alternative Site for Madison Square Garden: Sorkin Studios’ Late Submission

East
Thursday, June 20, 2013
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Sorkin's proposal to place Madison Square Garden atop Grand Central Terminal.

Sorkin’s proposal to place Madison Square Garden atop Grand Central Terminal.

The Municipal Art Society recently commissioned and released four versions of a re-imagined Penn Station. It commissioned Diller Scofidio + Renfro, H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture, SHoP Architects, and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) to prepare drawings of what a new terminal would like for the busiest train station in the country.

It has now come to light that actually a fifth concept was prepared but not presented at MAS’s “press conference.” The design by the firm Michael Sorkin Studio builds on MAS’s legendary 1970s protest against the destruction of Grand Central Station. In that protest Jacqueline Onassis famously joined forces with other powerful Manhattanites to stop a proposed Marcel Breuer high rise slated to be built above and across the southern front of Grand Central.

Continue reading after the jump.

National Trust Announces 2013 List of America’s Most Endangered Historic Places

National
Thursday, June 20, 2013
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Gay Head Lighthouse in Aquinnah, Massachusetts (Courtesy of Martha’s Vineyard Museum)

Gay Head Lighthouse in Aquinnah, Massachusetts (Courtesy of Martha’s Vineyard Museum)

Wednesday, the National Trust for Historic Preservation released its 2013 list of “America’s Most Endangered Historic Places” made up of cultural landmarks, historic houses of worship, civic spaces, derelict industrial structures, and a significant waterway. For twenty-five years, the National Trust has launched campaigns to save historic structures and places in regions across the United States—many of which are vulnerable from years of neglect or the threat of demolition. In a press conference over Twitter, President and CEO Stephanie K. Meeks explained the impetus for including these specific sites: “It’s always a tough choice, but we evaluate on significance, urgency of threat, and possible solution.” The designation, Meeks said, is a tool for drawing attention to places “in a national context of significance” that might otherwise go unnoticed.

This year’s motley list includes the likes of Gay Head Lighthouse in Martha’s Vineyard and San Jose Church in Puerto Rico built in 1532.

View the endangered sites after the jump.

James Turrell Exhibit Opens Friday at the Guggenheim

East
Thursday, June 20, 2013
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Aten Reign, James Turrell's largest museum installation ever, fills the rotunda of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. (David Held/Courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation)

Aten Reign, James Turrell’s largest museum installation ever, fills the rotunda of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. (David Held/Courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation)

Tomorrow, June 21, is the summer solstice. On the occasion, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum will open the doors on a major solo show of the work of James Turrell, called simply James Turrell. It’s a fitting day to open an exhibition on the American artist. Since the 1960s, Turrell has developed a diverse body of work that uses light as material and medium. The centerpiece of the show is Aten Reign, a site-specific installation that fills Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous rotunda. Made from a series of interlocking fabric cones that relate to the Guggenheim’s interior ramps, Aten Reign interlaces the prevailing daylight with subtly changing color fields produced by concealed LED fixtures. Viewed from below, on reclining benches or lying flat on the floor, with the gentle bubbling of the Guggenheim’s fountain providing aural accompaniment, the installation provides a meditative, perception altering experience.

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