Doomed to Demolition, Northwestern Names Three Firms to Design Prentice Successor

Midwest
Friday, June 28, 2013
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Bertrand Goldberg's Prentice Women's Hospital in Chicago. (ChicagoGeek/Flickr)

Bertrand Goldberg’s Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago. (ChicagoGeek/Flickr)

Perkins + Will, Goettsch Partners, and Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill will compete to design a successor to Bertrand Goldberg’s celebrated Prentice Women’s Hospital, which Northwestern University will soon demolish.

Booth Hansen will serve as the local architect of record. Northwestern, whose politically expedited approval from the Landmarks commission angered preservationists, selected the three firms from a larger pool based on their responses to a Request for Qualifications.

The winning firm will be chosen by December, according to their written timeline, but no construction work is planned until March 2017, according to Curbed.

Goettsch also designed Northwestern’s lake front Bienen School of Music, which is currently under construction.

Q+A> Part Two of AN’s Discussion with Eco-Architect Ken Yeang

National
Friday, June 28, 2013
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(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

This is second of a two part interview of Ken Yeang one of the earliest thinkers and designers in the field of sustainable architecture. The interview was conducted by Mic Patterson of Enclos who will be introducing Yeang at The Architect’s Newspaper’s Facades+PERFORMANCE conference on July 11 in San Francisco.

Mic Patterson: Your work clearly demonstrates that concepts of bioclimatic design are readily scalable from the residence to the skyscraper to the urban environment. How do the considerations of bioclimatic design apply at the scale of building subassembly or the the building skin?

Ken Yeang: At the sub-assembly level, we have developed devices such as the ‘raincheck’ wall being a glazing façade system that lets in ventilation but keeps out rain. Another device we are working on is a ‘solar chimney’ that uses a double-glazed glass-shaft to naturally ventilate internal spaces.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Cartesian Collection: A 17th Century Design Reboot

Fabrikator
Friday, June 28, 2013
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Fabrikator
The Cartesian Collection by Alexander Purcell Rodrigues was fabricated from 1/2-inch thick aluminum by the Neal Feay Company. (courtesy Alexander Purcell Rodrigues)

The Cartesian Collection by Alexander Purcell Rodrigues was fabricated from 1/2-inch thick aluminum by the Neal Feay Company. (courtesy Alexander Purcell Rodrigues)

An ambitious designer used Rhino to design and fabricate 20 variations on a chair in four months.

For a designer aiming to streamline the gap between design and manufacturing, parametric modeling tools are a natural solution. LA-based Alexander Purcell Rodrigues found a place to work in just such a way at the Neal Feay Company (NF), a 60-year old fabrication studio in Santa Barbara, California, that is known for its exceptional metalworking. Together, the designer and the fabrication studio created the Cartesian Collection of chairs, aptly named for the analytic geometry that helped facilitate close to 20 design variations on the same aluminum frame in just under four months. “Not only were we pushing the boundaries of aluminum fabrication, the aim was to simultaneously create a lean manufacturing process,” said Rodrigues.

Using Rhino with a Grasshopper plugin, Rodrigues developed a design for a chair that weaves together the simplicity of Western design with the complex ornamentation of traditional Eastern aesthetics. While the lines of the chair are clean and smooth, intricate embellishments on the back traverse multiple planes and angles, all on a shrunken scale. The time savings involved in designing with Rhino allowed the creation of another 19 variations on the theme. Read More

New York Officials Call on Governor Christie to Stop LG Electronics’ Palisades Headquarters

East
Thursday, June 27, 2013
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(Courtesy HOK / LG Electronics)

(Courtesy HOK / LG Electronics)

The battle over LG Electronic’s proposed office complex in New Jersey is getting increasingly political. Now New York City government officials are chiming in and expressing their opposition to the company’s plans to build a 143-foot-high HOK-designed headquarters atop the leafy Palisades along the Hudson River facing Manhattan.

Yesterday, Manhattan Borough President Scott M. Stringer and Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. sent a letter addressed to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie asking him to step in and stop the proposed plans for the office complex and urge a redesign of the building.

Continue reading after the jump.

Q+A> Eco-Architect Ken Yeang, Facades+PERFORMANCE Conference Keynote

National, Newsletter
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
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(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

Ken Yeang is an architect and was an early theorist of green architecture. In England, where he was educated at the AA (completing a diploma under Peter Cook) and Cambridge where he earned a PhD in ecological planning and design, Yeang is celebrated as a founder of the sustainable architecture movement. In 1995 he published his major theoretical work Designing with Nature that evolved out his Cambridge thesis and it is one of the first texts on ecological architecture. At the The Architect’s Newspaper’s Facades+PERFORMANCE conference on July 11, Yeang will lecture in the US for the first time at the University of California San Francisco in Mission Bay. Yeang recently answered a series of questions posed by Mic Patterson of Enclos who will introduce him in San Francisco. Here is part one of the interview, the second half will appear tomorrow on the AN Blog.

Mic Patterson Your early theoretical work, and ultimately your built work, anticipated the sustainable development that is finally beginning to emerge at a broader scale: climatic design, green walls and vertical gardens, sky courts, biomimicry, solar geometry as a form generator. Why has the adoption of these concepts by the building community been so slow? How do you see these themes developing into the future?

Ken Yeang. I am not sure why our concepts and ideas on green design have been slow to gain traction by the building industry and by our community of professionals. It may be because public adoption of new ideas first require champions by important figures like politicians and leaders in the profession and industry.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> A Grimshaw-Designed Garden Vision for Wimbledon

City Terrain, International
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
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(Courtesy Grimshaw)

(Courtesy Grimshaw)

The All England Club has unveiled its Grimshaw-designed Wimbledon Master Plan, which establishes a vision for the future of the site and a structure to direct the ongoing development and improvement of the Club. The Master Plan draws on existing assets and reflects the history of The Championships while resolving certain challenges that the site presents. Three new grass courts will be repositioned to ease overcrowding, No. 1 Court will be reworked and a fresh landscape scheme will enhance and define public areas.

Continue reading after the jump.

Related Eyes Chicago Spire Debt as Speculation On New Life Swirls

Midwest
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
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The Chicago Spire site, currently the city’s most-watched hole in the ground, has had false starts before. This week The Wall Street Journal reported that Related Cos. of New York signed on to buy the stalled project’s debt, raising suspicions that development might proceed on the riverfront site.

Santiago Calatrava’s twisting tower design was to stand 2,000 feet high and house condos, but the $64 million land bordering Lake Shore Drive in Streeterville sat idle after the recession hit in 2008. The troubled project has been tangled up in litigation ever since.

Ireland’s National Asset Management Agency put the project’s $93 million in debt on the market earlier this year. While Irish developer Garett Kelleher’s firm still holds title to the parcel, and Related’s reported deal remains up in the air, speculation swirls around the site which not long ago was prepared to house the nation’s tallest building.

Q+A> Francisco Mangado on Spain’s Foreboding Changes For Architects

International
Tuesday, June 25, 2013
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Municipal Auditorium of Teulada (left); Francisco Mangado (right)

Municipal Auditorium of Teulada (left) by Francisco Mangado (right)

At the AIA’s National Convention in Denver, held from June 19–22, AN’s Emily Hooper sat down with Spanish architect Francisco Mangado, who was in attendance to receive an honorary fellowship. Mangado discussed foreboding amendments to Spain’s law of professional services that would allow engineers, or anyone deemed “competent” in construction, to design and erect buildings across the nation. The law was introduced at a council meeting of Government Ministers in April of 2013, and a final pass-or-fail decision will be reached by the end of this year. Read More

Andrew Geller’s 1958 Pearlroth House Undergoing Restoration

Other
Tuesday, June 25, 2013
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pearlroth

Andrew Geller’s Pearl Roth House (1958) (Image Courtesy of Jake Gorst)

Andrew Geller‘s infamous Pearlroth House, a uniquely designed beach residence located on Dune Road in Westhampton Beach, New York, is undergoing a significant restoration. The task is being carried out by Richard Reinhardt of Reinhardt/O’Brien Contracting and is being supervised by architect Rick Cook, of Cook + Fox Architects, owners Jonathan Pearlroth and Holly Posner, and Andrew Geller’s grandson, Jake Gorst. The one-of-a-kind house was originally built in 1958 for Arthur Pearlroth, an executive for the New York Port Authority, who once had a reputation for being a “lady’s man,” but Gellar collaborated more closely on its actual design with Pearlroth’s wife, Mitch. The couple commissioned Gellar, who often drafted his designs only after carefully studying the projected site and the family’s living habits, to design a summer house that didn’t resemble their ordinary four-walled New York City apartment. The clever design has come to be referred to colloquially as the “square brassiere.”

Read More

Winning “Cellular Complexity” Installation Design Twists the Limits of Architecture

Newsletter, West
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Rendering and model of Cellular Complexity. (Courtesy Julia Koerner, Marie Boltenstern, and Kais Al-Rawi)

Rendering and model of Cellular Complexity. (Courtesy Julia Koerner, Marie Boltenstern, and Kais Al-Rawi)

AIA Los Angeles has announced that UCLA SUPRASTUDIO lecturer Julia Koerner’s proposal Cellular Complexity is the winning entry for the 11th annual 2×8 Student Exhibition, a scholarship organization that has showcased projects of over 150 students from more than 15 architecture and design schools in California. This year’s winning scheme, in collaboration with Paris-based architect Marie Boltenstern and architect Kais Al-Rawi, presents a parametric pavilion of twisting planes that transitions in porosity from one end to the other. According to the AIA|LA, the jury appreciated the design concept’s creativity and edginess. The installation and exhibition of student work is expected to be complete by February 2014.

More images after the jump.

LAX is Really Getting There: Fentress Opens Major Terminal Expansion

West
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Inside the Tom Bradley Terminal's new Great Hall (Sam Lubell/ AN)

Inside the Tom Bradley Terminal’s new Great Hall (Sam Lubell/ AN)

Don’t look now, but LAX—the airport everyone loves to hate—is starting to complete its major makeover. The biggest change is the brand new $1.9 billion (yes, billion) addition to the Tom Bradley International Terminal, designed by Fentress Architects and unveiled in 2008. Its curving roofline, emulating waves breaking on the nearby beach, pops up behind the original Tom Bradley structure, which itself was recently renovated (for the cost of $723 million) by Leo A Daly.

Continue reading after the jump.

“Sky Reflector Net” Installed at Lower Manhattan’s Fulton Center

East, Newsletter
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Construction of the Sky Reflector-Net at the Fulton Center. (Patrick Cashin / Courtesy MTA)

Construction of the Sky Reflector-Net at the Fulton Center. (Patrick Cashin / Courtesy MTA)

Next year, when construction wraps up at the Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan, commuters will be gazing up, rather than around, at the station’s new artistic centerpiece—a curved, 79-foot-high reflective aluminum diamond web encased in a stainless-steel tracery. The showstopper will send ambient daylight into the mezzanines, passageways, and possibly even the platforms to help passengers orient themselves in the transportation hub.

At $2.1 million, Sky Reflector-Net, an artist/architect/engineer collaboration between James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), Grimshaw Architects, and Arup, is an integrated work created for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Arts for Transit and Urban Design and Metropolitan Transportation Authority Capital Construction (MTACC). It is the largest such work that the MTA has ever commissioned. Sky Reflector-Net seamlessly incorporates both functional and aesthetic goals. The piece was recently installed within the transit center building designed by Grimshaw Architects and Arup.

Continue reading after the jump.

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