Chicago’s Divvy bike share program gets a corporate sponsor

Pro tip: A bike with the seat backwards means it's in need of repair. (John Sonderman / Flickr)

Pro tip: A bike with the seat backwards means it’s in need of repair. (John Sonderman / Flickr)

Divvy, Chicago’s bike share program, just sold the moving ad space of some 3,000 bicycles that have traveled 2.5 million miles since the system launched nine months ago. Illinois’ largest health insurance company, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois, paid $12.5 million to sponsor Divvy and brand its blue bikes and vans with their corporate logo beginning in June. The Chicago Tribune reported that the highest bidder was Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, which has also sponsored several other bikeshare systems in recent years, starting in Minneapolis. The health insurance company will pay $2.5 million each year through 2018—revenue the city will use to expand Divvy and fund bicycling projects throughout the city.

Put It Back: A Call to Rebuild Mackintosh’s Glasgow School of Art

(Ross Cowan / Flickr)

(Ross Cowan / Flickr)

[Editor's Note: Following a devastating fire at the Glasgow School of Art on Friday, May 23, the university has launched a fundraising campaign to assist with restoration and rebuilding efforts. To support the fund, donate online here. Work has been ongoing to assess the damage and salvage what remains. This article originally appeared on Witold Rybczynski's blog, On Culture and Architecture. It appears here with permission of the author. ]

The tragic fire at the Glasgow School of Art, Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s masterpiece, raises anew the question: How to rebuild? In a thoughtful blog, George Cairns of Melbourne’s RMIT, who has studied the building in detail, points out that many undocumented changes were made during the building’s construction, so it will be impossible to recreate what was there. In addition, the inevitable demands of modern fire security will likely alter the original design. Rather than try to rebuild Mackintosh’s design, Cairns argues for “great architects to be invited to design a worthy intervention that will breathe new life into the school.”

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile

08-guastavino-vault-exhibit-nyc-archpaper

Della Robbia Room Bar, Vanderbilt Hotel, 1912

Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile
Museum of the City of New York
1220 5th Avenue, New York
Through September 7th

Coming to New York City from Washington, D.C., this exhibition illuminates the legacy of architect and builder Rafael Guastavino. A Catalan immigrant, Guastavino created the iconic (and aptly named) Guastavino tile. By interlocking terracotta tiles and layers of mortar to build his arches, Guastavino married old-world aesthetics with modern innovation. The resulting intersection of technology and design revolutionized New York City’s landscape, and is used in over 200 historic buildings including Grand Central Terminal, Carnegie Hall, The Bronx Zoo’s Elephant House, and Ellis Island.

View a slideshow of Guastavino vaults after the jump.

Celebrate the 10th Anniversary of OMA’s Seattle Central Library with These 10 Great Photos

Architecture, Pictorial, West
Monday, June 2, 2014
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Seattle Public Library (Jeff Wheeler/Flickr)

Seattle Public Library (Jeff Wheeler/Flickr)

The Seattle Central Library celebrated its 10th anniversary this year on May 23rd with live music, free treats and refreshments, and guest appearances from some of the chief architects and minds behind the construction of the building. Regarded as the prize library of Seattle’s library system, the Seattle Central Library, designed by Rem Koolhaas’ OMA, has also garnered criticism and acclaim for its unique architectural design. To celebrate the decade, AN has compiled a collection of ten great photos that will give the online viewer a virtual tour of Seattle’s unique cathedral of reading.

Ten amazing photos of the library after the jump.

The Menil’s Modulated Light: Museum’s Design Creates a Light Choreography Through Space

Light Modulation starts outside the building (MDI/ Johnston Marklee)

Light Modulation starts outside the building (MDI/ Johnston Marklee)

The architecture of Johnston Marklee’s recently-unveiled Menil Drawing Institute has wowed most observers and critics, including our own. But an equally significant element of the $40 million project is its lighting, a combination of innovation and subtlety, natural and artificial light.

Continue reading after the jump.

MAD Studio Begins Construction of Organically-Curving Chaoyang Park Plaza Towers

Chaoyang Park Plaza. (Courtesy MAD Studio)

Chaoyang Park Plaza. (Courtesy MAD)

Nearly two years after preliminary discussions and planning, the Chinese studio MAD has set their project “Urban Forest” into motion, breaking ground in late April. Led by renowned architect Ma Yansong, MAD architects intends to transform the city of Beijing, China by erecting eco-friendly buildings—called Chaoyang Park Plaza—in the shape of natural landscapes commonly found in Southeast Asia.

More renderings after the jump.

New York City Asks Citi Bike to Cover $1 Million in Lost Parking Revenue

Citi Bike station in NYC. (Flickr / JMazzolaa)

Citi Bike station in NYC. (Flickr / JMazzolaa)

New York City’s bike share system, Citi Bike has had a rough first year. The bikes are in bad shape, the docking technology is glitchy, and the system has been plagued with financial troubles for months. To make matters worse for the beleaguered program, New York City is asking Alta Bikeshare—the company which oversees Citi Bike—to cough up $1 million to cover lost parking revenue from the parking spaces the bike stations occupy.

Continue reading after the jump.

Cambridge Architectural Weaves a Flexible Steel Curtain

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Installed in the lobby of the John and Frances Angelos Law Center, the moveable mesh curtain serves as a room divider and security screen. (Courtesy Cambridge Architectural)

Installed in the lobby of the John and Frances Angelos Law Center, the moveable mesh curtain serves as a room divider and security screen. (Courtesy Cambridge Architectural)

Strength and softness meet in a metal mesh room divider.

Interior dividers can be functional to a fault. If a partition is all you need, then even drywall would do the trick. A custom-built metal curtain in the University of Baltimore’s new law building, however, brings an architectural sensibility to the problem of dividing one space into two. The curtain bisects the lobby with stainless steel, woven into mesh for a unique and uncharacteristically soft texture. Read More

Chicago’s School of the Art Institute taps Jonathan Solomon as head of architecture

Jonathan D. Solomon. (Courtesy Solomon)

Jonathan D. Solomon. (Courtesy Solomon)

Chicago’s top art school announced big changes in its design department this morning.

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago Thursday announced their selection of Jonathan Solomon as the new Director of the Department of Architecture, Interior Architecture, and Designed Objects (AIADO). Solomon, who comes from his position as associate professor and associate dean at the School of Architecture at Syracuse University, assumes the job officially on August 1.

Read More

Glass Coating Cracks At Willis Tower’s 103rd Floor Observation Deck

The cracked platform. (Alejandro Garibay via NBC 5 Chicago)

The cracked platform. (Alejandro Garibay via NBC 5 Chicago)

At first glance, the glass-observation boxes that jut out of the Willis Tower’s 103rd floor don’t look all that safe—and that is exactly the point. The SOM-designed attraction, known as the Ledge, opened in 2009 and offers “thrill seekers,” “death defiers,” and “people who can wait in  a really long line” the chance to step outside of the iconic skyscraper and look straight down at the streets of Chicago, 1,353-feet below. The floor of the suspended structure is comprised of 1.5-inch laminated glass panels, which can hold 10,000 pounds and withstand four tons of pressure. So, the danger is all imagined, right? Well, it certainly didn’t feel that way for a California family who visited last night.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Lawsuit Filed to Block Cooper Union Tuition

Architecture, Dean's List, East, News
Wednesday, May 28, 2014
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Morphosis' New Academic Building at Cooper Union. (Wikimedia Commons)

Morphosis’ New Academic Building at Cooper Union. (Wikimedia Commons)

A group of Cooper Union professors, alumni, and students has filed a lawsuit against the school’s Board of Trustees over its decision last spring to start charging undergraduate tuition at the school. At the time, the board said the cash-strapped institution had no choice but to break their long-held tradition of offering free arts and architecture education. They announced that the change would go into effect this coming fall, and that tuition would be set on a sliding scale.

Read More

Artist Paul Tuller Gives Starchitects the Royal Treatment with “Architecture As Crown” Series

(Courtesy Paul Tuller)

(Courtesy Paul Tuller)

Brooklyn-based illustrator Paul Tuller was inspired to create a new poster-portrait series, Architecture As Crown, by his architect boyfriend. This series features illustrations of famous architect’s wearing their most famous works on their heads. Beginning as a parody of Andy Warhol‘s God Save the Queen, the project includes such figures as Peter Eisenman wearing House I as a crown. Purchase your own posters here.

View the starchitects in hats after the jump.

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