Five Top Firms Looking for Summer Interns

Dean's List, National
Wednesday, March 23, 2011
.

As spring rolls around, deadlines loom for coveted summer internships. AN has collected a list of five prestigious firms that are looking for their 2011 class of interns. Good luck!

Check out the list (and deadlines) after the jump.

Hudson Yards Update

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 22, 2011
.

Hudson Yards retail hub by German engineer Werner Sobek (Courtesy Related)

Related and its confrere Oxford Properties today launched a new website for Hudson Yards, with some surprises. Followers of the down & dirty rail yard turned 12 million square foot urban Elysium may be forgiven if they have forgotten some of the details of the winning scheme—we sure did. And besides that was yesterday and a master plan. Still, of all the names dropped and found, bandied about and sprinkled on for good measure, we sure do not remember Werner Sobek as a major player.

Read more after the jump.

BIG’s First Step into the Final Frontier

International, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 22, 2011
.
Courtesy BIG

A reflective sphere floats above a highway outside Stockholm in BIG's winning "Energy Valley" master plan (Courtesy BIG).

BIG won’t let its ambitions be impeded by the laws of physics–namely, gravity. For a competition to plan and design the area around the Hjulsta Intersection, a massive highway infrastructure project just north of Stockholm, BIG teamed up with firms Grontji and Spacescape to create “Energy Valley,” and their winning master plan addresses not only the area around the highway interchange but also above it. The plan’s surreal defining feature is “a reflective, self‐sustaining hovering sphere mirroring Stockholm as it is, new and old, creating a 180 degree view of the area for the drivers on their way in or out of the city.”

Covered with photovoltaic film and tethered to the ground, this mysterious giant orb would supposedly generate enough solar and wind power to keep itself aloft while also providing power for over 200 surrounding houses. Read More

Columbia Boathouse Marsh Hullabaloo

East, Newsletter
Monday, March 21, 2011
.

New renderings shown at the community meeting include a few details that won't make it into the final picture. Instead of galvanized steel and cables the rails will be executed in bent wood.

Columbia University looks as though it’s in the final stretch of the public review process for the proposed Boathouse Marsh designed by James Corner Field Operations and the Steven Holl-designed Campbell Sports Center. On Friday night and Sunday afternoon, Columbia University Executive VP Joseph Ienuso made presentations to neighborhood residents. A few media outlets dubbed the gatherings “dueling meetings,” due to some political infighting between council members Robert Jackson and Ydanis Rodriguez, which erupted during a subcommittee meeting before the city council last week. The background political drama only heightened already-tense negotiations between the neighbors and the university.

Continue reading after the jump.

EOA′s Spring Street Loft: Amuneal

Fabrikator
Friday, March 18, 2011
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

A swinging door reveals the freight elevator (EOA)

Sliding blackened steel walls create functional space in an art collector’s loft.

When Philadelphia-based Amuneal Manufacturing Corp. won a bid to fabricate a set of large movable residential walls designed by New York-based Elmslie Osler Architect (EOA), they had a lot of experience to draw on. As experts in the field of magnetic shielding, they work routinely for aerospace and scientific research industries, while the company’s custom fabrication branch handles everything from retail fixtures to large-scale public art installations. For EOA’s project, a gut renovation of a 2,200-square-foot Soho loft, Amuneal began with the architects’ drawings of large sliding doors needed to reveal or conceal parts of the apartment.

Read more after the jump.

Video> Model Performance

East
Thursday, March 17, 2011
.

Dave Munson's palm sized World Trade Center site.

Microsol Resources’ Tuesday night presentation of Z Printers at Cooper Union was notable for scale of output, both small and large (very large). The 3-D printers produce a powder-based model where all unused excess material gets recycled within the machine. The copier makes tiny models with extraordinary precision. The prices run from $15,000 to $65,000. But a panel of four presenters said the printer’s primary advantage is speed, allowing for new models to be created within 24 hours.

Two firms made notable presentations.  Xavier De Kestelier, an associate partner at Foster + Partners, veered from the script a bit when he showed a video of a cement printer being developed at Loughborough University in the UK. That hanger sized 3-D printer makes modular units that can be adapted as building components. Then, Wesley Wright, a designer with Pelli Clarke Pelli, brought the conversation back to the Z Printer, which he said has become an integral part of the firm’s design process.

The firm has four machines operating round the clock. Sketching right onto the models during the review process is not uncommon. In a video, no less than the maestro himself, César Pelli,  intones on the importance of model making in general and on 3-D printers in particular. Wright has graciously, and exclusively, shared his video with AN. We nabbed the Foster/Loughborough video from YouTube.

Watch both videos after the jump.

AN Mixed Media> The Furniture Debates

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, March 16, 2011
.
Michael Graves discusses furniture design (BK / The Architect's Newspaper)

Michael Graves discusses furniture design (BK / The Architect's Newspaper)

“Drafted: the evolving role of architects in furniture design.” It was a MAD idea: To talk about why American manufacturers don’t do the job they once did in supporting American architects and designers at making furniture. Held March 10 at the Museum of Arts & Design’s own restored and midcentury soigné auditorium, the assembled panel really knew what they were talking about:

Michael Graves recalled his early days working for George Nelson in riveting detail and why Target has dropped independent designers; Jeffrey Bernett, one of the few American designers routinely designing for B&B, summed up Italy versus Herman Miller; Gisue Hariri of Hariri & Hariri eloquently addressed why architects feel compelled to make furniture, and what happened when her architecture firm tried to go there on a larger scale; and Granger Moorhead of Moorhead & Moorhead gave great reason for everyone to hope there is another golden age, especially for New York furniture designers, just ahead.

Watch the highlight reel after the jump.

Manufacturers Trust Gets Yellow Light

East, East Coast
Wednesday, March 16, 2011
.
Manufacturers Trust Company Building in 1955 (Courtesy Municipal Art Society)

Manufacturers Trust Company Building in 1955 (Courtesy Municipal Art Society)

“Sometimes the best way to restore a historic structure is to reuse it.” The comment came from Landmarks Preservation Commissioner Robert Tierney at the conclusion of Tuesday’s landmarks hearing on revisions proposed by Vornado Realty for interiors of the recently landmarked Manufacturers Trust Building on Fifth Avenue. The statement summed up the mood of the commission with regard to changes in the space, originally designed by Gordon Bunschaft, which include dividing the first floor to make space for two retail tenants. Most of the commission picked apart the specifics while maintaining that the architects from SOM overseeing the renovation were generally on the right track.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gowanus On My Mind

East
Friday, March 11, 2011
.

A view of the Gowanus Canal (all images courtesy of Gowanus By Design)

 

The Gowanus Canal has been in the news a lot lately, with its superfund designation and sunken schooner. The canal and surrounding neighborhood have long fascinated architects and urbanists, and has been the subject of numerous architecture school design studios. A new ideas competition looks to develop that fascination into a series of proposals for the site, which would improve connectivity across and around the polluted waterway and take better advantage of the area’s unique history, character, and economic potential.

Read More

Su11′s K-Residence: Associated Fabrication

Fabrikator
Friday, March 11, 2011
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

Associated Fabrication’s thermoformed Corian shelf, designed by su11 (Associated Fabrication)

A combination banquette and shelving system gives a young family a new way to live in a 620-square-foot apartment.

Corian has become a darling of the digital fabrication set, its reputation as a dowdy countertop material giving way to explorations of the acrylic as a shape-shifting wonder with practical applications, from healthcare environments to art installations. For a couple that had nearly outgrown a 620-square-foot Murray Hill apartment, Corian served handily in the form of a new banquette and shelving unit that allowed the family to grow into the space, rather than move out of it. The project’s designer, su11 architecture + design, hired Brooklyn-based Associated Fabrication to create its vision of a functional sculpture that morphs from bench to windowsill to storage space.

Read more after the jump.

Kudos to Young Turks

West
Thursday, March 10, 2011
.

Patterns' FYF Residence in Argentina

AIA/LA has just announced the winners of its second annual “Arch Is” competition, open to California designers who have graduated from architecture school in the past five to twelve years. The victors are two of our favorites: FreelandBuck, headed by David Freeland and Brennan Buck, and P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S, led by Georgina Huljich and Marcelo Spina. Both are on the cutting edge of digital fabrication and complex, layered (not to mention curvy) design. See some of their work, below. And stop drooling. And check out a public forum featuring the winners at LA’s A+D Museum on March 24 a 7pm. Read More

Event> Organic Architecture for the 21st Century

Midwest
Monday, March 7, 2011
.
Courtesy Milwaukee Art Museum

Courtesy Milwaukee Art Museum

  • Frank Lloyd Wright: Organic Architecture for the 21st Century
  • Milwaukee Art Museum
  • 700 North Art Museum Dr.
  • Milwaukee, WI
  • Through May 15

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright is the single subject of the Milwaukee Art Museum’s new exhibit. Organic Architecture for the 21st Century, which celebrates the 100th anniversary of Taliesen, Wright’s Spring Green home and studio, also marks the debut of 33 never before seen drawings by the Wisconsin native. The show implores visitors to take a fresh look at Wright and his works, both built and unrealized, and how he envisioned architecture as something that had an essential relationship to context, time, and the people who lived or worked there. Sustainability, which we often think of as a 21st century innovation, is in keeping with many of Wright’s designs, especially those for a newly suburban America, including the outdoor arcade for the proposed Arizona State Capitol, Phoenix (above).

Organic Architecture for the 21st Century explores the idea that the famously outspoken architect was a visionary who foresaw trends including the use of mass produced materials, utilization of natural light, and attention to the surrounding environment. In addition to covering his major works, like Fallingwater, the Johnson Wax factory, and the Unity Temple, the exhibit also showcases plans for Living City, a culmination of Wright’s work and his utopian vision for suburbia.

Page 103 of 105« First...102030...101102103104105

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License