Disheveled Geometry

Fabrikator
Friday, August 30, 2013
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator

 
Students of Mark Foster Gage's Disheveled Geometries seminar fabricated a 20-by-40-foot panel of Obomodulan. (Mary Burr)

Students of Mark Foster Gage’s Disheveled Geometries seminar fabricated a 20-by-40-inch panel of Obomodulan.  (Burr/Stranix)

Students use parametric design to fashion a porous architectural screen that draws from contemporary marble sculpture.

In the third edition of Mark Foster Gage’s Disheveled Geometries seminar at the Yale School of Architecture, students Mary Burr and Katie Stranix began their exploration of extreme surface textures with marble. Inspired by the sculptural work of Tara Donovan and Elizabeth Turk, the student duo set out to design a delicate yet porous screen that transformed a two dimensional panel into a rhythmic and dynamic 3D structure.

According to Stranix, the first design emerged as an aggregation of several different parts and wasn’t intended for parametric processes. “We wanted to maintain delicacy in our design but add porosity,” she told AN, referencing Herzog & de Meuron’s ground level screen at 40 Bond Street in Manhattan. Working in Maya, the students added elliptical apertures in varying diameters to transform the two-dimensional form in a wavy, 3D screen that departed significantly from a standard panel format. Read More

On View> Currents 35: Tara Donovan at the Milwaukee Art Museum

Midwest
Tuesday, June 12, 2012
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Unititled, 2008. (Tara Donovan/Courtesy The Pace Gallery)

Unititled, 2008. (Tara Donovan/Courtesy The Pace Gallery)

Currents 35: Tara Donovan
Milwaukee Art Museum
700 North Art Museum Drive
Milwaukee, WI
Through October 7

The work of Tara Donovan demands close reading. By using strict rule-based systems, Donovan accumulates individual pieces of material into installations that defy easy identification. Milwaukee Art Museum chief curator Brady Roberts explains, “Donovan’s process involves selecting one material and finding one unique solution for its construction, whether it’s folding, gluing, stacking, or pressing.” Taking cues from 1960s conceptual artists like Donald Judd and Sol LeWitt, whose works rely on rule-based processes, Donovan obscures her quotidian materials to compose spectacular objects. The exhibition includes several major works including Haze, a 32-foot wall covered in approximately three million straws, Unititled, 2008 on polyester film (detail, above), and Drawing (Pins), 2011 composed of gatorboard, paint, and nickel-plated steel pins.

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