Al Jazeera launches “Rebel Architecture” documentary on architectural activism

Architecture, International, Media
Tuesday, August 19, 2014
.
The "Guerilla Architect." (Courtesy Al Jazeera via Screengrab)

The “Guerilla Architect.” (Courtesy Al Jazeera via Screengrab)

Al Jazeera has launched Rebel Architecture, a six-part documentary that profiles lesser-known architects who are using their design skills “as a form of activism resistance to tackle the world’s urban, environmental and social crises.” These designers aren’t building glass towers for the global elite, but schools, cultural spaces, and homes for everyone else. And they’re often doing it in legal gray area. Read More

Antoni Gaudi Could Become Patron Saint of Architects

Antoni Guadi, the soon-to-be patron saint of architects?

Antoni Guadi, the soon-to-be patron saint of architects?

For years, the Pritzker Prize has been the gold-standard in architectural recognition. It’s like the Super Bowl ring, or the Oscar for Best Picture, or whatever Joey Chestnut wins for downing 60-some hot dogs at Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest. (It’s gotta be a sash, right? It’s probably a sash.) This is the hallowed ground where the Pritzker lives. But it could soon be trumped in a big way. In a big enough way that even knighthood can’t quite compare. Hear that, Sir Norman Foster?

Read More

Frank Gehry Wins Spain’s Prince of Asturias Award For the Arts

(Courtesy Guggenheim Bilbao)

(Courtesy Guggenheim Bilbao)

Eighty-five year old Frank Gehry has been named the laureate of the prestigious Prince of Asturias Award for the Arts for his design for the Guggenheim Bilbao. He beat out thirty-six other candidates to become the sixth architect to win this illustrious honor. Gehry’s titanium design for the Guggenheim opened in 1997 and helped to breath new life into the industrial city. According to the jury, “His buildings are characterized by a virtuoso play of complex shapes, the use of unusual materials, such as titanium, and their technological innovation, which has also had an impact on other arts. An example of this open, playful and organic style of architecture is the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, which, in addition to its architectural and aesthetic excellence, has had an enormous economic, social and urban impact on its surroundings as a whole.”

Santiago’s Savior? Graphene Paint Considered for Valencia.  Santiago's Savior? Graphene Paint Considered for Valencia As AN reported earlier, Santiago Calatrava‘s legal battles with a number of his former clients are ongoing. The Spanish architect is embroiled in a number of disputes regarding issues of budget, maintenance, and functionality the costliest of which concerns the rapid deterioration of the facade of an opera house Calatrava designed in his hometown of Valencia, Spain. Now Graphenano, a Spanish manufacturer of graphene paint is offering a possible solution for the beleaguered architect. The company claims that a coating of their product would be enough to save building’s problematic mosaic exterior. Graphenstone is a paint from a mixture of limestone powder and graphene and has already been used to protect the facades of older buildings in other parts of Spain. (Image: Courtesy Graphenano)

 

Calatrava Must Pay: Spanish Architect Loses Latest Legal Saga

Development, International, Newsletter
Tuesday, February 18, 2014
.
Calatrava_archpaper1

Calatrava’s Palacio de Congresos in Oviedo (Nacho/flickr)

Santiago Calatrava has been ordered by a Spanish court to pay $4 million for problems plaguing a municipal building he designed in Oviedo in Northwest Spain. While the final fee is lower than an initial ruling, such legal problems have become something of an unfortunate calling card for the Spanish architect.

Read more after the jump.

Real Revelation: Madrid’s New Soccer Stadium

imagenes para web 1920x1280p

(Image courtesy L35 / GMP Architekten / Ribas & Ribas / Real Madrid CF)

Spanish soccer franchise Real Madrid has revealed plans for a drastic reshaping of its iconic Santiago Bernabeau stadium. The plan entails sheathing the existing structure in a curvaceous titanium facade that will also add a hotel, a shopping and leisure center, and an underground car park. The new skin also adds a retractable roof to the stadium.

Read and watch more after the jump.

Q+A> Francisco Mangado on Spain’s Foreboding Changes For Architects

International
Tuesday, June 25, 2013
.
Municipal Auditorium of Teulada (left); Francisco Mangado (right)

Municipal Auditorium of Teulada (left) by Francisco Mangado (right)

At the AIA’s National Convention in Denver, held from June 19–22, AN’s Emily Hooper sat down with Spanish architect Francisco Mangado, who was in attendance to receive an honorary fellowship. Mangado discussed foreboding amendments to Spain’s law of professional services that would allow engineers, or anyone deemed “competent” in construction, to design and erect buildings across the nation. The law was introduced at a council meeting of Government Ministers in April of 2013, and a final pass-or-fail decision will be reached by the end of this year. Read More

The City That Never Was: Learning from the Spanish Housing Bubble

International
Monday, February 25, 2013
.
Conditions outside of Madrid. (Jennifer E. Cooper)

Conditions outside of Madrid. (Jennifer E. Cooper)

Described as “crime scene photos,” stark images of Spain’s housing bubble landscapes depict a grim reality. But instead of a somber discourse on the evils of political corruption and real estate speculation, the Architectural League’s symposium this past Friday, The City That Never Was, looked forward and, as Iñaki Abalos aptly asked, wondered if we, “can turn shit into gold.”

Building on their research and design studios at the University of Pennsylvania, Chris Marcinkoski and Javier Arpa, the moderators, explored the future of urbanism through the lens of Spain’s economic crisis and its resulting desolate urban form. Framing the historical context of boom and bust cycles, they reveal that the Spanish situation is only unique in scale and intensity. It exists as part of a larger commodification of urbanism all over the world resulting in similar conditions in an ever simplified placeless urbanism.

Continue reading after the jump.

Video> Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia Awash in Psychedelic Light

International
Thursday, October 4, 2012
.
Gaudi's Segrada Familia awash in psychedelic light. (Courtesy Moment Factory)

Gaudi’s Segrada Familia awash in psychedelic light. (Courtesy Moment Factory)

Residents of Barcelona had the opportunity to see Antoni Gaudi’s 120-year-old La Sagrada Familia in a new light recently as Montreal-based media studio and light artists Moment Factory projection mapped a multimedia display over the cathedral’s facade. While Gaudi’s signature stone carvings portraying dripping stone, fanciful plant forms, and intricate religious displays in their normally sand-colored hue are usually enough to dazzle the viewers eye, the gaudy splash provided one psychedelic experience.

Watch a video after the jump.

Video> Chef Preps Sustainable Culinary Campus

International
Tuesday, February 8, 2011
.
Rendering of the whimsical elBulliFoundation campus

Rendering of the whimsical elBulliFoundation campus

Our friends at The Feast bring us news that molecular gastronomy guru Ferran Adria plans to build a campus for his elBulliFoundation that’s reminiscent of a Dr. Seuss fantasy. Adria aims for this complex to be ultra sustainable, with a goal of zero emissions.

Wondering what you might expect to find inside these whimsical, Wonka-esque structures? So were we. We hear that the current plan calls for an archive and brainstorming space (yes, brainstorming). Even more exciting, there will be “coral-like ceramic caverns” for the foundation’s chef-scholars to work in.

With a kitchen this crazy, we can’t wait to see what culinary creations are sure to follow.

Watch a fantastic video of the culinary campus after the jump.

A European Version of AN?

International
Monday, March 1, 2010
.

Just when things were looking bleak for print, here comes new bi-monthly European publication Panorama, which has already been billed by one blogger as Europe’s answer to the Architect’s Newspaper. The printed (yes, PRINTED!) glossy broadsheet is published by the makers of  Future Arquitecturas, a magazine on international competitions. A one year subscription will cost £15.00 in Europe and £17.00 in the rest of the world. We found its Facebook page here. No response yet from the pub, but it appears Panorama began  last year, and is published in both English and Spanish. According to the RIBA bookshop, the January issue  included an interview with Spanish architect Carlos Ferrater as well as stories on the new Dallas Theater Center, on plans for the new home of the National Archives of France, and Andalusia’s tallest building, The Towers of Hercules. We’re so proud of our little printed sibling.

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License