Joseph Rykwert Win’s the 2014 RIBA Royal Gold Medal

Joseph Rykwert. (Courtesy AA London)

Joseph Rykwert. (Valerie Bennett / Courtesy AA London)

Joseph Rykwert, architectural critic, historian, and writer won the 2014 RIBA Royal Gold Medal, a distinction that has typically been awarded to architects. He is a leading authority on the history of art and architecture and has had a major impact on designers and architects since the 1960s. He will be presented the award at a black tie dinner at RIBA’s London headquarters.

More after the jump.

RIBA Halts Lubetkin Prize Honoring International Projects.  RIBA Halts Lubetkin Prize Honoring International Projects Building Design Online reports that 2013 will be the last year of the Lubetkin Prize, an honor the Royal Institute of British Architects has awarded annually since 2006 to the best new building outside of the European Union.  Whereas RIBA members and fellows were the only candidates eligible for the honor, in 2015 the organization plans to launch a new International Prize open to all architects. In September, London firm Wilkinson Eyre received what now becomes the last Lubetkin Prize for their Gardens by the Bay project in Singapore (pictured). (Photo:  Nimrod Bar / Flickr)

 

Theis and Khan to design RIBA’s New Headquarters.  Theis and Khan to design RIBA's New Headquarters Sawing off competition from five other shortlisted firms, British architects Theis and Khan have been selected to design the Royal Institute of British Architects‘ new headquarters in London. Located only a few buildings away at 76 Portland Place in downtown London, RIBA’s new premises are to be located inside the current Institute of Physics building, which will be entirely renovated. The existing RIBA offices will be freed up for new exhibition and events space. Construction will begin in March 2014 and is expected to last a year. (Photo: NICK GARROD/ FLICKR)

 

Restored Ruins of Astley Castle Win UK’s Most Prestigious 2013 RIBA Stirling Prize

International
Thursday, October 3, 2013
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Restored Ruins of Astley Castle Win 2013 Riba Stirling Prize (Courtesy Bruce Stokes / Flickr)

Restored Ruins of Astley Castle in Warwickshire, England Win 2013 RIBA Stirling Prize as Best Building of the Year (Courtesy Bruce Stokes / Flickr)

A few years ago, 12th-century-built Astley Castle was no more than a fire-ravaged, crumbling medieval structure in the English countryside.

Now, since its clever restoration by Witherford Watson Mann Architects in 2012, the Landmark Trust-sponsored residence in Warwickshire has been deemed “building of the year” as the winner of the most prestigious architectural prize in the United Kingdom, the Royal Institute of British Architects’ 2013 Stirling Prize. With its fortified ruins artfully incorporated into contemporary construction as a luxury vacation home, RIBA President Stephen Hodder praised the Astley Castle restoration as “an exceptional example of how modern architecture can revive an ancient monument.”

However, this year RIBA was unable to secure a sponsor to provide the £20,000 given to winners of the past, BD Online reported. This is the first year that the Stirling Prize comes with no cash value.

Continue Reading After the Jump.

Wilkinson Eyre Architects Awarded 2013 RIBA Lubetkin Prize for International Conservatories

International
Wednesday, October 2, 2013
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Cooling Conservatories, Gardens By the Bay, Singapore. (Courtesy Choo Yut Shing / Flickr)

Cooling Conservatories, Gardens By the Bay, Singapore. (Courtesy Choo Yut Shing / Flickr)

Last week, England-based architecture firm Wilkinson Eyre Architects was announced as the recipients of the 2013 Royal Institute of British Architects’ Lubertkin Prize for their recent international project Cooling Conservatories, Gardens By the Bay in Singapore. This is the second consecutive year the firm has been awarded the prestigious RIBA prize for best new international building. Last year, they won the title for the Guangzhou International Finance Centre in China.

Continue Reading After the Jump.

Whimsical Green Promenade Aims to Revive London’s Disconnected Vauxhall Neighborhood

(COURTESY OF ERECT ARCHITECTURE)

(COURTESY OF ERECT ARCHITECTURE)

From the mid-17th to the mid-19th century, crowds of Londoners sought entertainment at the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, located on the south bank of the River Thames. The acres of greenery that made up the garden were once the site of numerous whimsical attractions, including tight-rope walkers, concerts, fireworks, and narrow winding walkways perfect for amorous adventures. Today the neighborhood of Vauxhall, located in the heart of Nine Elms, is mostly known for the railway arches that slice across the neighborhood, disconnecting it from the riverside and labeling it as the “missing link” between the New US Embassy Quarter and London’s South Bank.

Continue reading after the jump.

Another Laurel for Peter Zumthor, the RIBA Gold Medal

International
Thursday, September 27, 2012
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Peter Zumthor. (Helene Binet / Courtesy Pritzker Prize)

Peter Zumthor. (Helene Binet / Courtesy Pritzker Prize)

Pritzker winner Peter Zumthor will be awarded the 2013 Royal Institute of British Architects Gold Medal, according to Building Design. Known for his meticulously-wrought projects like the thermal baths in Vals, Switzerland, the Brother Klaus Field Chapel in Eifel, Germany, the Bregenz Kunsthall in Austria, and the witch trial memorial in Norway, Zumthor is now designing a major expansion at LACMA. “We debate each of the six shortlisted candidates in turn then look at their writing and their influence in acadaemia, but there wasn’t one clear person who stood out,” RIBA president Angela Brady told BD.

More after the jump.

Six Firms Competing for 2012 Stirling Prize

International
Monday, July 23, 2012
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London Olympic Stadium by Populous.

London Olympic Stadium by Populous.

The shortlist for the coveted annual Stirling Prize from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has been announced! With six contesting projects to choose from, judges will begin visiting all six sites and will convene for a final vote on October 13, 2012. Among the six shortlisted projects are Maggie’s Cancer Centre and New Court Rothschild Bank, both by the OMA, London’s new Olympic Stadium by Populous, and David Chipperfield’s Wakefield, the Barbara Hepworth sculpture gallery in Yorkshire.

View all the shortlisted projects after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Countenance Cartography, In Situ Study, Old Becomes New, and Venice Vexed

Daily Clicks
Friday, August 19, 2011
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Courtesy Ingrid Dabringer via Core77

Courtesy Ingrid Dabringer via Core77

Mapping Visage. Canadian artist Ingrid Dabringer has attracted attention for her unique map paintings, finding countenances in irregular land masses. The artist explained that she draws inspiration from large-scale topography and lines on detailed maps. Dabringer believes that maps hold meaning and by adding her own touches, she seeks a more personal interpretation within a traditional tool. More at Core77.

In Situ Study. Recently on Building Design, third-year architecture student Jonathan Brown posed the following question, “Do architecture students today focus too heavily on design theory and practice and consequently, neglect construction skills that cannot be taught in a classroom?” Not alone in his query, the latest RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) “Part of the Picture” campaign permits graduates to credit three months of on-site experience toward their education.

Now and then. Technology and the internet have transformed the way we preserve and promote history, particularly our photographs. Trendcentral highlighted three exciting websites: Historypin, where users can upload historic photos and search geo-tagged photos by time, period, and address; Dear Photograph posts reader-submitted photographs of historic photos in context; and the Flickr group, Looking into the Past, includes a diverse range of historic-current photo collages.

Troubled Bridge over Water. Conservationists and architects have rejected the Venetian superintendent’s call to replace the historic Ponte del Accademia with a glass and steel substitute, reported Building Design. Although architects Schiavina of Bologna have incorporated an Istrian stone version of the iconic bridge’s gentle arch in their design, prominent art critic Francesco Bonami has dubbed the plans a “bad crash.” Plans remain on hold while the city seeks funding for the €6 million design.

American Museums Shortlisted for the RIBA Lubetkin Prize

East
Friday, July 29, 2011
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Boston Museum of Fine Arts by Foster + Partners (Courtesy Nigel Young)

Boston Museum of Fine Arts by Foster + Partners (Courtesy Nigel Young)

Last week, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) announced that two U.S. projects have been shortlisted for the RIBA Lubetikin Prize. The distinction honors building projects outside the European Union that set a standard for international excellence. The American projects chosen as finalists are The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston by Foster + Partners and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Virginia by Rick Mather Architects.

“This year’s shortlist is unusual in that they are all big budget projects—each with a contract value over $100 million,” RIBA president Ruth Reed said in a statement. “The list mixes some of world architecture’s most famous names, with a younger practice so it will be interesting to see who the judges choose as a winner.” The prize will be announced on October 1 followed by a feature on the winners on BBC 2′s The Culture Show.

Other finalist projects from around the world: Zaha Hadid’s Guangzhou Opera House (Guangzhou, China), Foster’s Masdar Institute (Masdar City, Abu Dhabi) and the Met by WOHA (Bangkok, Thailand).

Take a look at the shortlist after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Vertical Farming, Hadid in Paris, Stirling Shortlist, Bored to Death

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, July 26, 2011
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(COURTESY ROMSES ARCHITECTS VIA SPIEGEL ONLINE)

(COURTESY ROMSES ARCHITECTS VIA SPIEGEL ONLINE)

Farming Right Side Up. Spiegel Online reported on vertical farming research in South Korea as an innovative means of remedying food shortages on an increasingly urban planet. For the time being, agricultural scientist Choi Kyu Hong conducts his own version of Dickson Despommier’s Manhattan urban gardening project in an unexceptional 3-story industrial building, but Hong and his team have outfitted the farm with solar panels, LED lighting, and recycled water infrastructure hoping to attract enough attention to bring vertical farming to the global market and city skyscrapers.

Hadid Stands Still. After touring New York, Tokyo, and Hong Kong, the Chanel Mobile Art Pavilion designed by Zaha Hadid claims its permanent home in the front plaza of the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris, France. A Daily Dose of Architecture noted that the pavilion now features the Zaha Hadid Une Architecture exhibition, creating a thematically coherent viewing experience inside and out.

Stirling Search. Bustler posted the Royal Institute of British Architects’ (RIBA) shortlist for this year’s £20,000 ($32.5K) RIBA Stirling Prize. The list includes previous prize winners Zaha Hadid and David Chipperfield, as well as O’Donnell + Tuomey, Allford Hall Monaghan Morris, Bennetts Associates Architects and Hopkins Architects Partnership for the 2012 London Olympic Park.

Bored to Death. After tunneling through the subterranean rock of Midtown Manhattan for the new Grand Central Terminal train station, the 200-ton serpentine drill will be left to decompose 14 stories underneath Park Avenue. The New York Times revealed that the Spanish contractor in charge of the 4-year excavation ensured the MTA that this internment is both practically and economically preferable to dismantling the drill.

Going to the Chapel. Curbed posted the two winners of a pop-up chapel competition celebrating gay marriage in New York. ICRAVE’s entry calls for a pavilion of colorful ribbons while Z-A Studios design forms recycled cardboard into a curving tulip. Both designs will built in Central Park this weekend where they will host 24 weddings.

Brits Get Chummy in San Francisco

West
Monday, April 19, 2010
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RIBA launches chapter in San Francisco.

After the way Sir Norman Foster was ousted from a project  in San Francisco recently, we wondered whether there would be some mutterings at the kick-off party for the new chapter of the Royal Institute of British Architects (which is the sixth US chapter–there is also one in L.A.).   Read More

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