Eavesdrop> Tettamant Booted: Could Dallas’ Nasher Sculpture Center Get a Sunlight Reprieve?

(Courtesy Nasher Sculpture Center)

(Courtesy Nasher Sculpture Center)

Thirty-four months have gone by since the Scott Johnson–designed Museum Tower hove into view and the Nasher Sculpture Center is still, er, gnashing its teeth. Every afternoon at around three o’clock glaring sunlight reflects off of the condo’s mirror like glass curtain wall, invading the Renzo Piano–designed skylit galleries, burning holes in the lawn, defoliating the trees, and no doubt increasing the air conditioning bill. Thirty-four months and nothing has been done to make it right, until June.

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And Now A Gehry Tower For LACMA? What’s Next?

Model of Zumthor's newest scheme for LACMA, along with massing study of new tower. (Courtesy LACMA)

Model of Zumthor’s newest scheme for LACMA, along with massing study of new tower. (Courtesy LACMA)

The surprises keep coming at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). After learning that the museum plans to shift its proposed Peter Zumthor–designed building southward (partially bridging Wilshire Boulevard) to avoid damaging the La Brea Tar Pits, now comes news that the museum is hoping to partner with LA’s transit agency, METRO, to build a tower across the street.

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Eavesdrop> Your Work is Worth the Price of Admission (and so Much More)

Architecture, Art, East, Eavesdroplet
Tuesday, June 10, 2014
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Construction of the new Whitney Museum in February 2014. (Timothy Schenck)

Construction of the new Whitney Museum in February 2014. (Timothy Schenck)

Major museums are really expensive these days, and boy do we like to complain about it (actually we get into most museums for free with a press pass, but we still love to complain about it)! Well gather ‘round dear readers, because we’ve got a bit of nice news for once. The new Renzo Piano–designed Whitney Museum is offering free admission for a year to all the men and women who are building their new Meatpacking location. It’s a nice counter to all the bad news about labor conditions at major cultural and educational institutions in the Middle East (we’re looking at you, NYU).

Eavesdrop> “Tourism” Now Pronounced “Voyeurism” in London

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Peeping into a neighbor’s room through a glass reflection. (Courtesy Financial Times)

Peeping Toms, bust out the kazoos. Your field day has arrived—and it comes equipped with party favors. The Shard, designed by Italian architect Renzo Piano, is London’s tallest skyscraper and, as of last week, home to a new luxury hotel. The rooms include breathtaking views of the city—and, thanks to a design flaw, unscrupulous views of unsuspecting neighbors.

Glass panels on the Shard’s exterior bestow the building with a crystalline front and its namesake. But at night, the city’s lights turn the glass into mirrors that fully reflect guest bedrooms into each other. Complementary binoculars (“for the view,” ahem) don’t help matters. Nor do puns about the naked eye. Masking a blush? Rest easy—susceptible rooms include shades for extra privacy.

Eavesdrop> Is Zoltan Pali Out at the Academy Museum?

Eavesdroplet, West
Thursday, May 8, 2014
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02b-academy-museum-losangeles-renzo-piano-archpaper02a-academy-museum-losangeles-renzo-piano-archpaper

 

In sad but spectacular gossip news, we’ve been informed that Culver City firm SPF:a has been removed from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences’ new museum project in Los Angeles. SPF:a principal Zoltan Pali had been working with Renzo Piano on the project since 2012.

Continue reading after the jump.

REX + Front Studio Create Sun-Responsive Shade to Protect Dallas Museum

City Terrain, Southwest
Monday, November 18, 2013
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(Courtesy Lexigon)

(Courtesy Lexigon)

Renzo Piano’s Nasher Sculpture Center was designed with natural sunlight in mind. A roof covered by pierced aluminum screens allows dappled light to enter its art galleries in subtle warmth. The outdoor sculpture garden is open to the elements and a specifically-planted landscape by Peter Walker reaps the benefits of the Texan sun.

Since its construction in 2005, the museum has become an icon of the Dallas Arts District. In 2011, a 42-story condominium building went up across the street, banking on the popularity of Piano’s art haven. While the glazed curved glass facade of “Museum Tower” offers million dollar views of the museum below, it burns the artworks and plants with a directed glare.

Now, a pair of New York–based architects might have a solution.

Continue Reading After the Jump.

Testing Begins on Renzo Piano’s Dragonfly Wind Turbine Blade

International, Sustainability
Monday, October 28, 2013
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‘Dragonfly’ Wind Turbine (Photo: Renzo Piano Building Workshop)

‘Dragonfly’ Wind Turbine (Photo: Renzo Piano Building Workshop)

You might know Renzo Piano as the architect behind many of the world’s leading museums, but get ready to meet Renzo Piano, wind-turbine expert. Testing has commenced on Renzo Piano’s small-scale wind-turbine blade at the Molinetto Test Field near Pisa, Italy. Piano’s turbine blade resembles a dragonfly’s wing and incorporates elements from the insect that promote stability in flight in order to allow the turbine to tolerate gale-force winds.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> Renzo Piano’s Stacked Masses Create an Efficient Paris Judicial Complex

International, Newsletter
Wednesday, October 23, 2013
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Paris Courthouse (Renzo Piano Building Workshop)

Paris Courthouse (Renzo Piano Building Workshop)

Renzo Piano has unveiled renderings for the new Palais de Justice, positioned on the northern edge of central Paris in the urban expansion area of Clichy-Batignolles, which will provide space for and unite numerous judicial services presently scattered throughout the city. The law courts complex appears as a slender, translucent, 525-foot-tall tower comprised of four stacked rectangular masses diminishing in size as they ascend. The structure includes extensive fenestration to blend the division of the interior and exterior, in addition to two exterior glass elevators offering expansive views of the city.

Continue reading after the jump.

Video> Get a Sneak Peek of Renzo Piano’s Addition to Kahn’s Kimbell Art Museum

Newsletter, Southwest
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
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Renzo Piano is again in architectural relationship with Louis Kahn. Early in his career, Piano worked briefly with the Louis I. Kahn office. This time, his architecture is separate but complementary.

Set to open on November 27th, the Renzo Piano Pavilion at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, TX will expand the exhibition space of the historic 1972 Louis Kahn-designed museum, creating an art complex on the site. A new video preview of the building has been released, in which Kimbell Director Eric Lee explores the exterior features and promotes excitement for its opening.

See the Proposed Interior Rendering After the Jump.

San Francisco Academy of Sciences Adding Pavilion to Piano-Designed Campus

West
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
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Conceptual rendering of the new dining pavilion (Mark Cavagnero Associates)

Conceptual rendering of the new dining pavilion (Mark Cavagnero Associates)

The San Francisco Academy of Sciences has okayed a small new dining pavilion designed by Mark Cavagnero, to sit adjacent to its Renzo Piano-design museum, reports the San Francisco Chronicle‘s John King. The 12-foot-tall, 1,450 square foot space will be located in a corner of the museum’s west garden, replacing an unused aviary.

The project is still in conceptual stages, but so far it looks as though it would be rectilinear, lightweight, and glassy, with a large cantilevered flat roof providing shade. Museum guests can bring food out to the pavilion, or just use the space for relaxation. The rather minimal construction should make a good counterpoint to Piano’s dynamic, undulating one. “When cultural facilities hire star architects to attract attention and set a new tone, the follow-through is as important as the first-year buzz,” pointed out King.

Michael Van Valkenburgh Overhauling The Menil Collection Campus

National
Wednesday, June 19, 2013
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Renzo Piano's Menil Collection. (Paul Hester)

Menil Collection. (Paul Hester)

New York-based landscape architecture firm Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA) has been selected to develop new designs for The Menil Collection’s 30-acre campus in Houston, Texas. The appointment kicks off the Menil’s “neighborhood of art” master plan, designed in 2009 by London-based David Chipperfield Architects. Chipperfield’s scheme attempts to tie together a group of six buildings spread across several blocks and interspersed with outdoor sculpture gardens and green spaces. The museum anticipates that groundwork for the initial stage of MVVA’s design will begin this September.

Continue reading after the jump.

CTC Helps Piano Give LA’s Resnick Pavilion the Pompidou Treatment

Fabrikator
Friday, February 15, 2013
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The bright red cladding calls attention to the mechanical systems as the “lungs of the building.” (Courtesy CTC)

CTC realized Piano’s design concept by designing and fabricating a cladding system of a structural steel tube framework covered by extensive FRP panels.

For his design of the Resnick Pavilion at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Renzo Piano revived an idea he first explored with Richard Rogers in their design of the Centre George Pompidou in Paris: the idea of the building as an organic breathing machine. At Pompidou, the architects turned the museum’s mechanical systems into expressive elements, color coding the pipes, ducts, gantries, and escalators and pulling them to the exterior of the structure. At the Resnick Pavilion, Piano located the mechanical rooms and air handling units prominently outside the four corners of the 45,000-square-foot building, applying cladding to the ductwork in a bright red color used in circulation corridors throughout the LACMA campus.

Piano turned to Capastrano Beach, California-based design/build firm CTC (Creative Teknologies Corporation) to realize his design concept. “We took in data from three parties,” said CTC president Eric Adickes. “Piano gave us perspective sketches of how he wanted the air handling units to look, the air conditioning contractor, Acco, gave us Revit drawings, and the general contractor, MATT Construction, gave us 2D Autocad documents of the building and concrete foundation.” From those sources, CTC developed 3D models of a cladding system for the ventilation ducts using CATIA.

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