Dutch Architects Propose Floating Island Made of Recycled Plastic

Recycled Island (Courtesy Design Villa)

Recycled Island (Courtesy Design Villa)

Considering how much trash Baltimore’s solar-powered Trash Interceptor scoops out of the city’s harbor—50,000 pounds a day!—these floating islands made from found plastic waste might just stand a chance. With the support of the Creative Industries Firm NL, WHIM Architecture is developing a prototype of their project, the recycled island, built primarily from recycled plastic waste gathered from the North Pacific gyre and the North Sea.

Read More

Alexander Gorlin Wraps Supportive Housing in a Binary Skin

Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
Located in the Bronx, The Brook provides housing and support services for the formerly homeless and individuals living with HIV/AIDS. (Courtesy Alexander Gorlin Architects)

Located in the Bronx, The Brook provides housing and support services for the formerly homeless and individuals living with HIV/AIDS. (Courtesy Alexander Gorlin Architects)

An aluminum rain screen and locally-sourced brick articulate a two-part program.

The Brook, developed by Common Ground and designed by Alexander Gorlin Architects, is part of a new wave of affordable housing communities popping up all over the United States. Unlike the public housing projects of the mid-twentieth century, which focused exclusively on housing and tended to suffer from a lack of routine maintenance, The Brook, located in the Bronx, combines apartments and support services under one roof. This duality is manifested in the envelope’s contrasting material palette—dark grey brick for the residential spaces, raw aluminum over the community facilities. “The idea of the exterior was to symbolize, as well as reflect, the internal program of Common Ground as supportive housing,” said Alexander Gorlin. “It’s inspired in part by Le Corbusier and his idea of expressing the program on the facade, and expressing the public functions as a means of interrupting a repetitive facade.” Read More

Carry a Piece of the Minneapolis Metrodome Wherever You Go

Midwest
Thursday, August 22, 2013
.
Inside the Metrodome (left, Jenni Konrad / Flickr) and the Duluth Pack bags (right, Courtesy Duluth Pack)

Inside the Metrodome (left, Jenni Konrad / Flickr) and the Duluth Pack bags (right, Courtesy Duluth Pack)

What’s sure to become the ultimate tailgating accessory for Minneapolis Vikings football fans this year has hit the market at the Minnesota State Fair. Thanks to Duluth Pack, makers of bags and tents, the collapsed roof of the Minneapolis Metrodome has been reborn as a duffel and shell bag, appropriately part of the “Domer” collection. The stadium’s white fabric dome collapsed in 2010 under the weight of Minneapolis’ plentiful snow, the fourth time such an event has occurred.

Continue reading after the jump.

Shigeru Ban Reinvents Earthquake-Damaged Christchurch With Temporary Cardboard Cathedral

International, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 13, 2013
.
Cardboard Cathedral, Exterior (Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects)

Cardboard Cathedral, Exterior (Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects)

As a result of a devastating earthquake in February 2011, New Zealand’s Christchurch Cathedral was left critically damaged. After an inconclusive debate about whether to completely tear down, restore, or remodel the original Neo-Gothic cathedral, the people of Christchurch were struck with what might be divine inspiration in the form of a temporary home, the world’s only cathedral constructed extensively of cardboard.  Tourism New Zealand announced the inauguration of Cardboard Cathedral, a replica of the original church constructed of cardboard tubes, timber joints, steel, and concrete.

Continue reading after the jump.

Oyler Wu, The Graduation Experts, Design Another Pavilion for SCI-Arc

Dean's List, Newsletter, West
Wednesday, May 22, 2013
.
Looking up at Storm Cloud (Clifford Ho)

Looking up at Storm Cloud (Clifford Ho)

After creating their 2011 and 2012 graduation pavilions for SCI-Arc, Oyler Wu has once again produced a striking structure LA-based school, this time on the occasion of their 4oth anniversary. Dubbed the Storm Cloud pavilion, the structure salvages the existing steel from the 2011 Netscape,  which served as the school’s graduation pavilion two years ago. Looking at Storm Cloud, one can hardly tell it shares much of the bones that made up the older pavilion.

Continue reading after the jump.

Breaking> Chinese Architect Wang Shu Awarded Pritzker Prize

International
Monday, February 27, 2012
.
Wang Shu in front of his New Academy of Art HangZhou, China. (Iwan Baan)

Wang Shu in front of his New Academy of Art Hangzhou, China. (Iwan Baan)

Chinese architect Wang Shu has been named the 2012 Pritzker Architecture Prize laureate, marking the first time a Chinese architect has been honored prize which brings a bronze medal and $100,000 purse. Wang Shu is known for building with traditional Chinese forms and materials, often recycling bricks and tiles to form a patchwork mosaic in his buildings, which demonstrate a distinct modern sensibility. He is professor and head of architecture at the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, China and founded Amateur Architecture Studio with Lu Wenyu in 1998 where he has taken an outspoken stance against architecture that he perceives as destroying vast urban and rural landscapes across China.

Continue reading after the jump.

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License