Julian Castro Sworn In As Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

Castro at today's swearing-in. (Courtesy Department of Housing and Urban Development)

Castro at today’s swearing-in. (Courtesy Department of Housing and Urban Development)

Julian Castro, the former mayor of San Antonio, was sworn in Tuesday as the country’s next Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Castro succeeds Shaun Donovan who was tapped to head the Office of Management and Budget. During Donovan’s tenure at HUD, he oversaw the Rebuild by Design competition, which selected its winners earlier this summer. Among his many responsibilities in his new role, Castro will likely be heavily involved in the execution of those projects, which include work from BIG, SCAPE, Penn Design/OLIN, OMA, Interboro, and MIT.

ASLA New York to Honor Rebuild by Design Champion, Leader of Governors Island

Governors Island (Courtesy The Trust for Governors Island)

The head of the Trust for Governors Island is among those being honored. (Timothy Schenck)

The New York chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year at the 2014 President’s Dinner Gala. For this occasion, the ASLA has selected the Rockefeller Foundation’s Judith Rodin, the Trust for Governors Island’s Leslie Koch, and the NY1 News Organization as their honored guests.

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San Antonio Mayor Reportedly Tapped To Replace Donovan as HUD Secretary

Julian Castro who is expected to be the next HUD Secretary. (FLICKR / NOWCastSA)

Julian Castro who is expected to be the next HUD Secretary. (FLICKR / NOWCastSA)

President Obama will reportedly nominate San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro to lead the Department of Housing and Urban Development. If confirmed by the senate, Castro will succeed Shaun Donovan, a trained architect, who has been at the agency since 2009. Donovan is expected to head the Office of Management and Budget.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architecture 101> Harvard Students Tackle Policy and Design for Post-Sandy Resiliency

JohnsonTramba_TrevorAlison2

A breakdown of Tramba and Johnson’s restructuring of the National Flood Insurance Program using Jersery City as a pilot site. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

As the Rebuild By Design jury mulls over a winner of its resiliency-based design competition to re-imagine the East Coast in light of Hurricane Sandy, students in Harvard’s Graduate School of Design have been creating their own ways to protect against the Next Big Storm. While their studio, titled “Design and Politics,” was purely academic, it was modeled on the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s official competition. The Dutchman in charge of Rebuild, Henk Ovink, oversaw the interdisciplinary teams of students, and representatives from half of Rebuild’s final ten teams served as jurors at the studio review.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> BIG’s “BIG U” for Lower Manhattan

The "Big U" wraps around Battery Park. (Courtesy BIG)

The “Big U” wraps around Battery Park. (Courtesy BIG)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s BIG’s “Big U” that could save Lower Manhattan from the next superstorm.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> OMA’s Plans to Protect Coastal New Jersey

Aerial rendering of OMA's plan. (Courtesy OMA)

Aerial rendering of OMA’s plan. (Courtesy OMA)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s OMA‘s plan to protect The Garden State’s coast.

See the plan after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> Waggonner and Ball, unabridged Architecture’s Plan For Bridgeport, CT

The plan for Bridgeport, Connecticut. (Courtesy Waggoner and Ball, unabridged Architecture, Yale, and Arcadis)

The plan for Bridgeport, Connecticut. (Courtesy Waggoner and Ball, unabridged Architecture, Yale, and Arcadis)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s how Waggonner and Ball, unabridged and Yale ARCADIS’ team plans to create a more resilient Bridgeport, Connecticut.

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Rebuild By Design> HR&A’s Commercial Corridor Resiliency Project

Resiliency in Red Hook. (Courtesy HR&A/Cooper Robertson)

Resiliency in Red Hook. (Courtesy HR&A/Cooper Robertson)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s how the team led by HR&A/Cooper Robertson plans to bring resiliency to the East Coast from the Rockaways to Red Hook.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> Sasaki’s Plan To Save the Beaches of the Jersey Shore

The Jersey shore in Sasaki's plan. (Courtesy Sasaki)

The Jersey shore in Sasaki’s plan. (Courtesy Sasaki)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s Sasaki’s plan to save the Jersey shore.

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Rebuild By Design> Penn Design/OLIN’s Plan for South Bronx Resiliency

The Hunts Point Lifeline. (Courtesy Penn Design / OLIN)

The Hunts Point Lifeline. (Courtesy Penn Design / OLIN)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s Penn Design and OLIN’s plan for the South Bronx.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> WXY and West 8′s “Blue Dunes” for New York and New Jersey

The Blue Dunes. (Courtesy WXY/West 8)

The Blue Dunes. (Courtesy WXY/West 8)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s WXY and West 8′s plan for “blue dunes.”

COntinue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> SCAPE’s Living Breakwaters Transform Staten Island’s South Shore

Aerial view of SCAPE's living breakwaters. (Courtesy SCAPE)

Aerial view of SCAPE’s living breakwaters. (Courtesy SCAPE)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s SCAPE‘s plan for Staten Island’s South Shore.

Continue reading after the jump.

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