Origami Architecture: Make’s Portable Pop-Up Kiosks Fold Metal Like Paper

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Make Architects' kiosks fold open and shut. (Courtesy Make Architects)

Make Architects’ kiosks fold open and shut. (Courtesy Make Architects)

Inspired by Japanese paper-folding, Canary Wharf booths make a sculptural statement whether open or shut.

Make Architects’ folding kiosks for Canary Wharf in London bring new meaning to the term “pop-up shop.” The bellows-like structures were inspired by Japanese paper folding. “[The kiosk] had to be solid, but lightweight, so then that led us to origami,” said Make lead project architect Sean Affleck. “[You] end up with something very flimsy; add a few folds and creases, and suddenly the strength appears. In the folds, the shape appears.”

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South Street Seaport Plans Summer Experiment in Temporary Urbanism

East
Wednesday, May 15, 2013
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(Courtesy Howard Hughes Corp.)

(Courtesy Howard Hughes Corp.)

The South Street Seaport‘s Pier 17 won’t be around much longer in its current form as it awaits a $200 million overhaul by SHoP Architects, but this summer, the neighborhood surrounding it has some exciting plans in store that bring the hottest trends in temporary urbanism to the waterfront site. Starting on Memorial Day Weekend, the See/Change program will bring film screenings, a SmorgasBar, and pop-up shipping container boutiques in hopes of enticing New Yorkers back to this once-trendy Lower Manhattan neighborhood.

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San Francisco’s Shipping Container Village Grows Up, Adds High-Style Retailer

West
Thursday, February 7, 2013
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Aether's jutting glass mezzanine. (Peter Prato)

Aether’s jutting glass mezzanine. (Peter Prato)

There’s a new couture addition to PROXY, the temporary shipping container village in San Francisco’s Hayes Valley, designed by architects Envelope A+D.  Adding to PROXY’s cool coffee shop, ice cream parlor, and Biergarten is a new store for clothing company Aether, made up of three forty foot shipping containers stacked atop one another, supported by steel columns.  The guts of the first two containers have been carved out, making a double story retail space, with a glass mezzanine above jutting to the side, providing display space and views. A third container for inventory storage is accessible via a custom-designed drycleaners’ conveyor belt spanning all three floors. Workers can literally load garments from the ground floor and send them up to the top.

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Boxman Studios Continues Push To Pop-Up Shipping Containers

National, Newsletter
Tuesday, February 5, 2013
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Google Village at TED Long Beach. (Courtesy Boxman Studios)

Google Village at TED Long Beach. (Courtesy Boxman Studios)

Boxman Studios, the company that pioneered the shipping-containers-turned-housing trend back in 2008, is now embarking on a whole new shipping container revolution. As part of their sustainable building efforts they are adapting decommissioned containers to enhance already complete buildings and even stand alone as pop-up shops, venues, restaurants, transit stations and more.

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