Peter Eisenman Wins Prestigious Italian Award.  Peter Eisenman. (Chris Wiley)Peter Eisenman. (Chris Wiley) Peter Eisenman has been awarded with the 2014 Piranesi Prix de Rome for Career Achievement by the Accademia Adrianea di Architettura e Archeologia and the Ordine degli Architetti della Provincia di Roma. At the official ceremony to be held in Rome next month, Eisenman will give a lecture that “will concentrate on his theoretical work, with particular reference to the concept of ‘archaeology’ – understood as a design technique based on stratigraphic layering – and on the recent work entitled Piranesi Variations.”      

 

Calling All Deconstructivists: Eisenman’s House VI About to Hit the Market

East
Wednesday, April 10, 2013
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Peter Eisenman's House VI. (Via Archdaily)

Peter Eisenman’s House VI. (Via Archdaily)

If any admirers of deconstructivism are in the market to buy a house, they will be curious to learn that Peter Eisenman’s iconic structure, House VI, will be up for sale in late May or early June. Owners Suzanne and Richard Frank commissioned Eisenman—a member of the New York Five—to design and build a house on their 6-acre property in Cornwall, Connecticut. Suzanne Frank had previously worked as a researcher and librarian for Eisenman’s Institute for Architecture & Urban Studies. The house, completed in 1975, is an unconventional play on a grid and intended to be a “record of the design process.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Decon Artists: Wigley, Tschumi, Eisenman Reflect on MoMA’s Landmark “Deconstructivist Architecture” Exhibit

East, Eavesdroplet
Thursday, February 14, 2013
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Parc de la Villettes. (Lauren Manning / Flickr)

Parc de la Villettes. (Lauren Manning / Flickr)

On January 22, Mark Wigley, Bernard Tschumi, and Peter Eisenman took the stage in MoMA’s theater to reflect upon Deconstructivist Architecture, the landmark 1988 exhibit curated by Wigley and Philip Johnson. The press release at the time described the featured architects—including Coop Himmelblau, Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Daniel Libeskind, along with Tschumi and Eisenman­—as “obsessed with diagonals, arcs, and warped plans.”

In a where-are-they-now moment, Wigley said, “It occurred to me that only Daniel Libeskind thought the show was about the future, and he still seems to be designing for the show, and that seems to be not a good idea.” And the sniping didn’t stop there. Eisenman, despite refusing to hold the microphone to his mouth, could be overheard saying what kind of exhibit he would—or rather, wouldn’t—do, if given the chance: “Well, it wouldn’t be like the biennale of last fall, which was sort of a discount supermarket of everything that was going.” “Including you,” zinged Wigley.

QUICK CLICKS>Lost Library, Bad Planning, Homey, Pricey Park

Daily Clicks
Monday, May 2, 2011
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The old Lenox Library designed by Richard Morris Hunt.

Flummoxed Lenox. Inspired by a Gothamist post about hidden rooms in the Frick, Mark Lamster digs a bit deeper and shares his knowledge of the site when it was occupied by the old Lenox Library. “…sober, imposing, and correct, much like the man who designed it, Richard Morris Hunt,” he says of the old edifice, before delving into the curious history of the Hunt memorial across the street.

Boulevard Blues. Brownstoner is still hammering away at a bleak streetscape along 4th Avenue in Brooklyn, where first floors of the new residential buildings leave a lot to be desired. The site reports that City Planning may be looking at measures to fix mistakes from 2003 upzoning and bring more life onto the street. While they’re at it, perhaps they can tap the DOT to add some green to the median.

House vs. Home. A kinder and gentler Peter Eisenman emerged from nearly 20 years of Jungian analysis, the architect tells The Washington Post. Far from the heady world of theory (“I was a cerebral cat”), Eisenman returns to the world of bricks and mortar. The change helps him expound on the differences between a house and home.

Tick Tock. The clock is ticking for the Brooklyn Bridge Park to make a decision on how to pay for maintaining the park, reports Crains. “If we don’t have a financial model, we won’t be able to proceed with construction,” BBP President Regina Myer tells the paper.

The Banality of Fashion

International
Friday, November 20, 2009
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The controversial photos: These were among the shots from a fashion shoot done at Peter Eisenmans Holocaust memorial in Berlin. (Courtesy New Statesman)

The offending images: These were among the photos from a fashion shoot done at Peter Eisenman's Holocaust memorial in Berlin. (Courtesy New Statesman)

First the cracks, and now this? Sure, Peter Eisenman’s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin has seen its fair share of controversies over the years, but it doesn’t get much worse than a fashion shoot for an in-flight magazine. According to the New Statesman‘s scoop, easyJet had no idea the Holocaust memorial had been used as the backdrop for a bunch of models because its magazine is produced by an outside company. That company has yet to speak up about the matter, so it remains unclear whether the fine folks at INK publishing are ignorant or just stupid. Looks like Hannah Arendt is right once again. Read More

A Star Turn for Sambo

National
Tuesday, July 21, 2009
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Architectural documentaries are all the rage these days, from Louis Kahn to Frank Gehry and, most recently and sadly, Julius Shulman. Now comes another, Snakebit about Rural Studio and its inimitable founder Samuel “Sambo” Mockbee, that, like its predecessors, seems unexpectedly moving, even for architecture buffs. Read More

Eavesdrop NY 10

Eavesdroplet
Thursday, June 4, 2009
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We know you love the gossip. AN aims to satisfy that itch in print, online, East Coast, West Coast, whatever, wherever, whenever. So here comes Eavesdrop to our blog so you can get it faster, feistier, anywhere you are. Plus, we will be posting Sara Hart’s online-only EAVESDROP ALERTs. But the real fun begins in the comments section, where you can lay on your own gossipy tidbits. And Sara will be sure to respond.

For Whom the Buell Tolls

There are some whispers coming from the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University’s GSAPP. Our ears immediately perked up, because we never hear anything much from that stone corner of the academic groves. Founded in 1982, the center’s first director was Robert A.M. Stern, who was followed by Gwendolyn Wright, Richard Buford, Joan Ockman (who stepped down about a year ago), and Reinhold Martin, who currently holds the post. The whispers have it that Professor Martin is changing the center’s mild mission to a more politically left-leaning agenda. Some female members of the 12-person board of advisers are also miffed that he’s held boys-only dinners, like a recent bash with board members Peter Eisenman, Stern, and GSAPP Dean Mark Wigley. Could another Penguin Club be in the making?

Read More

Eisenman Says West is Best

Other
Friday, May 8, 2009
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Michael Graves, David Childs, and Peter Eisenman share a laugh at the Urban Center.

Michael Graves, David Childs, and Peter Eisenman share a laugh at the Urban Center.


On May 4 at the Urban Center, Peter Eisenman and Michael Graves had a conversation, moderated by David Childs, about their favorite books to inaugurate the exhibition, Unpacking My Library. In the light of the current crisis that the print media is experiencing, listening to these legendarily erudite bibliophiles was a rare privilege. But the evening was not without controversy. Read More

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