Rebuild By Design> Penn Design/OLIN’s Plan for South Bronx Resiliency

The Hunts Point Lifeline. (Courtesy Penn Design / OLIN)

The Hunts Point Lifeline. (Courtesy Penn Design / OLIN)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s Penn Design and OLIN’s plan for the South Bronx.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rebuild by Design> Ten Proposals for a Resilient East Coast Revealed

City Terrain, East
Tuesday, October 29, 2013
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SCAPE/Landscape Architecture's proposal (Courtesy of SCAPE/Landscape Architecture)

SCAPE/Landscape Architecture’s proposal. (Courtesy SCAPE/Landscape Architecture)

A year ago, Hurricane Sandy swept through the East coast—destroying thousands of homes, shutting down infrastructure, and knocking out substations—which resulted in $68 billion in damage. Yesterday, a day before the anniversary of the super storm, ten finalists in the Rebuild by Design competition  unveiled their proposals to remake a more resilient coastline. The competition—launched by Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), among other participating organizations—called on the final teams to provide ideas for making the affected coastal areas more resilient to withstand future storms and climate change.

View the proposals after the jump.

Ten Teams Shortlisted for HUD’s Rebuild by Design Competition

National
Friday, August 9, 2013
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(David Sundberg/ESTO)

(David Sundberg/ESTO)

In response to Hurricane Sandy, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) launched the Rebuild by Design competition to develop strategies to increase the resiliency of urban and coastal areas in the face of extreme weather events and climate change. According to HUD’s website, the goal of the competition is “to promote innovation by developing regionally-scalable but locally-contextual solutions that increase resilience in the region, and to implement selected proposals with both public and private funding dedicated to this effort. The competition also represents a policy innovation by committing to set aside HUD Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery funding specifically to incentivize implementation of winning projects and proposals. Examples of design solutions are expected to range in scope and scale—from large-scale green infrastructure to small-scale residential resiliency retrofits.”

The shortlist of 10 teams—including architects, landscape architects, university groups, developers, engineers and others—has been announced.

View the shortlisted teams after the jump. .

Architecture Students To Build A Wind & Solar-Powered Radio Station in Kenya

Dean's List, East, International
Thursday, April 18, 2013
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africa_arch_01

Jonathan Dessi-Olive with the first arch of his timbrel vault prototype. (Courtesy PennDesign Team)

University of Pennsylvania architecture student Jonathan Dessi-Olive, this year’s winner of the Robert A.M. Stern Architects (RAMSA) Travel Fellowship, and three of his colleagues are taking an ancient building technology to Kenya this summer to demonstrate a sustainable alternative to wood construction, which contributes to the devastating deforestation problem in the region. The project, a hybrid wind- and solar-powered radio station on Mfangano Island in Lake Victoria, will introduce local craftspeople to the 600-year-old technique of timbrel vaulting, a system that uses thin clay tiles to create a geometrically-complex and structurally strong building.

Continue reading after the jump.

Beyond Pruitt-Igoe

Other
Wednesday, April 8, 2009
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Jeff Hou, Stephanie Bailey, D.K. O-Assere, Nisha Botchwey, and Malo Andre Hutson served as panelist at the "Unspoken Borders" conference. (photos courtesy of PennDesign)

The University of Pennsylvania School of Design sought to bring social equity back into architectural discourse last weekend with a conference called “Unspoken Borders: The Ecologies of Inequality,” hosted by the Black Student Alliance. Architects have been skittish about addressing large-scale social issues ever since the profession’s notorious Pruitt-Igoe-style failures in the 1960’s, said presenter Craig Wilkins. Since then, he added, the predominant attitude among architects has been, “‘We’re not doing that again. They got mad at us the last time we did that!’” Read More

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