New York City allocates $5.8 million to stabilize Philip Johnson’s New York State Pavilion

The Tent of Tomorrow. (Henry Melcher / AN)

The Tent of Tomorrow. (Henry Melcher / AN)

After decaying for years, the New York State Pavilion from the 1964 World’s Fair is getting some TLC. The New York Times reported that $5.8 million was allocated in New York City’s budget to stabilize the Philip Johnson–designed pavilion in Queens.

More after the jump.

14th Annual Serpentine Pavilion Opens in Kensington Gardens, Designed by Smiljan Radic

Perched atop several large boulders, this year's pavilion is an organically shaped fiberglass shell that houses a cafe. (Courtesy Serpentine Gallery)

Perched atop several large boulders, this year’s pavilion is an organically shaped fiberglass shell that houses a cafe. (Courtesy Serpentine Gallery)

On June 26, London’s Serpentine Gallery opened its 14th annual Serpentine Pavilion in Kensington Gardens. Designed by Chilean architect Smiljan Radic, the pavilion is made up of an organically formed semi-transparent fiberglass shell structure perched atop giant boulders sourced from a local quarry. Over the next four months, visitors will be encouraged to interact with the 1,700-square-foot installation, which is occupied by a cafe and multi-purpose event space.

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UNStudio Completes Flower-Shaped Pavilion for Horticultural Exhibit

Aerial view of the pavilion. (Courtesy UNStudio)

Aerial view of the pavilion. (Courtesy UNStudio)

UNStudio has completed a sprawling, flower-like campus for the 2014 Horticulture Exhibit in Qingdao, China. The Theme Pavilion consists of four metallic structures that stretch out over 300,000-square-feet and resemble a Chinese rose from above. And at the human scale, the metallic, undulating structures interact with their mountainous surroundings.

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On View> Dan Graham’s Rooftop Pavilion at the Metropolitan Museum Reflects on Public Space

(Courtesy Metropolitan Museum)

(Courtesy Metropolitan Museum)

Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout
Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 5th Avenue, New York
Through November 2. 2014

One of the great gifts bestowed on New York in the summer is the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s roof garden. You are thrust into Olmsted’s Central Park from a promontory surrounded by the perimeter skyline on all sides. The trick with the rooftop art commissions is to play with the space, the views, and the interrelationships between the two. The goal is to make the viewer see them differently—you want to feel like the rooftop is your personal terrace in the sky while sharing it with others in a magnificent secret shared space.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Biber Architects’ American Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015 to Honor Food Trucks and Vertical Farming

The U.S. Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015. (Courtesy Biber Architects)03-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper

 

The United States will celebrate one of its most prized national treasures at the next World’s Fair: the food truck. In honor of the theme of the 2015  Milano Expo—“Feed the Planet, Energy for Life”—the American Pavilion, called American Food 2.0, includes street-level food trucks that will serve up some favorite American dishes. James Biber, the New York City–based architect of the pavilion, told Business Insider, it’s not been decided which food trucks will be included at the site, but that there will be lobster rolls “for sure.”

But the pavilion design doesn’t end with food trucks.

Continue reading after the jump.

Friday> Freecell & Pulitzer Foundation turn a vacant lot in St. Louis into a parade of public programs

Conceptual rendering of Lots at the PXSTL site  Image. (Freecell Architecture via Pulitzer Foundation)

Conceptual rendering of Lots at the PXSTL site. (Freecell Architecture via Pulitzer Foundation)

Last year, a vacant lot across the street from the Pulitzer Foundation in St. Louis became the site of a design competition for a temporary built-environment installation. New York’s Freecell Architecture won PXSTL’s $50,000 project budget and $10,000 honorarium for a proposal to erect an adjustable canopy for performances and gatherings—an idea Kristina Van Dyke, director of the Pulitzer Foundation, called “both monumental and ephemeral at the same time.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Yeezus! What a Jury! The Living and The Dead at MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program

Design, East, Eavesdroplet
Thursday, April 10, 2014
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The Living's pavilion, Hy-Fi. (Courtesy The Living)

The Living’s pavilion, Hy-Fi. (Courtesy The Living)

The MoMA PS 1 jury process that selected the “100 percent organic pavilion Hy-Fi” for its 2014 pavilion may have been a contentious group. The museum announced last month that David Benjamin, the principal of Brooklyn-based firm The Living, would design the temporary structure. But several sources have told Eavesdrop that one of the short listed firms (Collective-LOK, PARA-Project, WOJR, over,under, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, LAMAS, Pita + Bloom) was in fact told that it—not Benjamin—had won the design competition.

The story unfolds after the jump…

Chilean architect Smiljan Radic wins 2014 Serpentine Pavilion

Radic's 2014 Pavilion. (Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

Radic’s 2014 Pavilion. (Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

Chilean architect Smiljan Radic has been selected to design the 2014 Serpentine Pavilion in Kensington Gardens, England. Radic is one of the youngest and least-known architects to receive this prestigious honor since it was first awarded 14 years ago. Plans for his pavilion show an expressive, cloud-like structure that will glow at night. The space will also include a cafe, and on some summer nights it will become a stage for art, poetry, music, and film.

According to Serpentine Galleries, the structure’s translucent shell will “house an interior organised around an empty patio, from where the natural setting will appear lower, giving the sensation that the entire volume is floating. At night, thanks to the semi-transparency of the shell, the amber tinted light will attract the attention of passers-by like lamps attracting moths.” The pavilion will be open from June 26t to October 19th.

Silent Light Installation Illuminated Sound Pollution in Brooklyn

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Silent Lights at Night (New York City Department of Transportation/Flickr)

First proposed in 2011, Brooklyn’s Silent Light installation has finally become a reality.  Located at the intersection of Park Avenue and Navy Street under the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway (BQE) in Red Hook, the series of gates frames a pedestrian walkway that passes through an area of heavy vehicular traffic. The structures are covered in LED lights activated by surrounding noise from cars to create fleeting light shows of various colors and patterns.

Continue reading after the jump.

Out of Chaos, Japanese Designers Shape a Pop-Up Bar Made From Reed-Grass

Exterior view of Yoshi bar, courtesy Takeshi Asano

Exterior view of Yoshi bar, courtesy Takeshi Asano

Designer Naoya Matsumoto and her peers at Seian University of Art and Design have created a unique meeting space for students on the Japanese campus. Their creation, a pop-up bar, is created from six panels of locally-sourced reeds called Yoshi. The chaotic construction resembles a traditional gabled roof structure in abstract form. Each year, students of the design school are challenged to create objects from the Yoshi reeds which grow freely around Lake Biwa, an area close to the university campus.

Continue reading after the jump.

MODU’s Outdoor Room at the Beijing Olympic Park Draws Attention to Air Pollution

International
Tuesday, November 26, 2013
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(Matthew Niederhauser / Courtesy MODU)

(Matthew Niederhauser / Courtesy MODU)

The design team at MODU, in collaboration with Ho-Yan Cheung of Arup, have created an urban public space for the 5th China International Architecture Biennial. Their design pays homage to Beijing’s iconic Olympic Park, while drawing attention to environmental issues in the country’s densely populated capital. The biennial committee has also commissioned designs from leading international architects such as Wang Shu, Zaha Hadid, and Mohsen Mostafavi.

Continue reading after the jump.

Snøhetta and Architexas Make Leaves of Steel

Fabrikator, Southwest
Friday, September 27, 2013
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator

 
The pavilion's design is inspired by the surrounding tree canopy. (Courtesy Architexas)

The pavilion’s design is inspired by the surrounding tree canopy. (Courtesy Architexas)

A Dallas pavilion’s exposed structure demanded extremely tight tolerances of Irving, Texas–based fabricator, CT&S.

Ten years ago, the Dallas Parks & Recreation Department launched a revitalization project to update 39 decrepit pavilions throughout its park system. One of them—which was to be designed by the New York office of Norwegian architecture firm Snøhetta in partnership with local practice Architexas—sat at the mouth of a meadow lined by old pecan and oak trees on the southern side of College Park. Speaking about the site, Snøhetta director Elaine Molinar said, “You’re aware you’ve left the surrounding neighborhood and entered a more rural setting.” This is the feeling that the team wished to encourage in its design for a new pavilion.

Continue reading after the jump.

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