Ian Schrager Pens Deal To Build 25-Story Lower East Side Tower

East
Friday, December 28, 2012
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Site of Ian Schrager's planned tower. (Courtesy Google)

Site of Ian Schrager’s planned tower. (Courtesy Google)

Boutique hotel pioneer Ian Schrager plans to expand his newest hotel concept, Public, to New York with a new 25-story hotel and residential tower on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The Wall Street Journal reported today that Schrager and investors paid $50 million for the site at 215 Chrystie Street, once a garden for an adjacent low-income tower at 10 Stanton Street. The land was sold after tenants and the tower owner struck a deal to build a rooftop recreation area and extend affordability of the units. Schrager gained fame in the 1970s for operating the famous Studio 54 nightclub and has more recently developed the Gramercy Park Hotel and the Herzog & de Meuron-designed 40 Bond condo building, where he lives in the penthouse.

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Trumped by the Ocean: Hurricane Sandy Squanders Jones Beach Plans

East
Friday, December 28, 2012
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Plan for Trump on the Ocean. (Courtesy of NY State Parks)

Plan for Trump on the Ocean. (Courtesy of NY State Parks)

While waterfront development continues uninhibited in some parts of New York City, it looks like Hurricane Sandy has put the kibosh on Donald Trump’s plan for a large catering hall-restaurant complex at Jones Beach dubbed Trump on the Ocean, replacing a former Robert Moses-era restaurant once on the site. From the beginning, Trump faced opposition from the state over the design of the project and spent several years locked in legal battles. Many lawsuits later, Trump and New York State finally came to an agreement this summer.

But just when Trump got the green light to move the project forward, Sandy swept the east coast and flooded the construction site. Jones Beach State Park suffered serious damage from the storm and only some areas have been reopened. This past Wednesday, Trump and state parks Commissioner Rose Harvey announced that they will be abandoning the project altogether. The Parks Department hasn’t given up on the idea of building something at the former Boardwalk Restaurant site, but Commissioner Harvey said that “we have concluded that building a major new facility directly on the oceanfront, on the scale of the Trump project, is not prudent policy.”

Lowline Advocates Tout Economic Benefits of Proposed Subterranean Park

East, Newsletter
Thursday, December 27, 2012
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(Courtesy Lowline)

(Courtesy Lowline)

Lowline boosters James Ramsey and Dan Barasch spoke with the Wall Street Journal this week, shedding light on a few economic details surrounding what could become New York City’s first subterranean park, built in an abandoned trolley terminal owned by the MTA underneath Delancey Street in the Lower East Side. Project co-founders Ramsey, an architect and principal at RAAD Studio, and Barasch have most recently been working on creating a full-scale mock-up of their fiber-optic skylight that will bring natural daylight to the cavernous underground space after raising $155,000 on Kickstarter.

The team is now promoting the park armed with a new economic impact summary, claiming that it will add value to the adjacent Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA). Specifically, Ramsey and Barasch argue that building the park would boost SPURA land values by $10 to $20 million and generate up to $10 million in taxes over the next 30 years. The Lowline also revealed its estimated budget, clocking in somewhere between $44 and $72 million to be paid for by a combination of fundraising, donations, and tax credits. If all goes according to plan, the Lowline could be financially self-sufficient, with a $2 to $4 million operating budget paid for by special events and commercial space. Uncertainty still looms over project, however, as the MTA hasn’t agreed that the space will be allowed to be converted into a park.

Governor Cuomo To Fund Study of High Line-Style Park in Queens

East
Thursday, December 27, 2012
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Plans for The QueensWay Highline (Courtesy of Friends of the Queensway)

Plans for The QueensWay Highline (Courtesy of Friends of the Queensway)

New York Governor Cuomo might have just tipped the scale in the heated dispute over a 3.5-mile stretch of abandoned railroad track in Queens with his donation of nearly a half-million dollars to the Trust for Public Land to conduct a feasibility study for a High Line-style linear park called the QueensWay. Slated to begin in January and February of next year, the study could take up to eight months to complete. But some Queens residents are pushing to restore train service on the elevated viaduct, and in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, a faster and more efficient connection between the Rockaways and Midtown Manhattan is winning the support of some local advocates and politicians. As Crain’s mentioned in a recent story, it would be no easy feat to rebuild the Long Island Railroad’s Rockaway branch, and could likely cost up to half-billion dollars.

Video> Fly Through Norman Foster’s Proposed Changes To the New York Public Library

East
Wednesday, December 26, 2012
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Last week, AN reported on Norman Foster’s newly-rendered plans to transform the landmark New York Public Library at Bryant Park. Foster’s $300 million plan will, most dramatically, gut the off-limits-to-the-public book stacks and replace them with a light-filled atrium and reading space. The NYPL has now released a video fly-through of the project, above. Enjoy!

On View> Diagramming Schematic Intangibility by Robert Strati

East
Wednesday, December 26, 2012
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(Courtesy Robert Henry Contemporary)

(Courtesy Robert Henry Contemporary)

Diagramming Schematic Intangibility
Robert Henry Contemporary
56 Bogart Street
Brooklyn, NY
Through January 6

Robert Strati’s work uses everyday materials to expose overlooked and unseen parts of our everyday lives. Employing ink-jet prints, wire sculptures, balloons, and packaging tape, Strati blends art with architectural theory, music, and science. His prints imitate scientific formulas, on top of astrological maps, on top of musical staffs, creating an interaction between formal shapes—points, lines, and planes—and metaphysical visualizations. Three-dimensional space is explored through wire sculptures and balloons that reveal invisible forces, like air and wind. The use of simple materials to reveal complex “dimensions of reality” was inspired by the works of Kasimir Malevich, Agnes Marin, Eva Hesse, Guglielmo Marconi, Leslie J. “Airplane” Payne, Gego, and Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks.

On View> Marking Time at New York’s Yossi Milo Gallery through January 19

East
Friday, December 21, 2012
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(Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery)

(Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery)

Marking Time
Yossi Milo Gallery
245 10th Avenue
New York
Through January 19

Chris McCaw’s continuing work on Sunburned, a series of photographs that began in 2006, will be displayed in his solo exhibit Marking Time. By combining a large-format camera with a high-tech lens normally used for military surveillance and inserting expired gelatin silver photo paper, McCaw captures images of the sun, exposing the paper from anywhere between 15 minutes to 24 hours. The extended exposures intensify the sun’s rays on the photo paper burning holes on the photographs. Thus, McCaw is able to capture and track the earth’s orbit around the sun. His photographs are taken at various locations across the globe including the Galapagos, the Sierras, and the Arctic Circle, enabling him to capture different rotations of the sun due to solar eclipses or equinoxes. In his image Sunburned GSP #429 (North Slope Alaska, 24 hours) McCaw captures the trajectory of midnight sun during the Arctic Circle’s summer solstice. The sun’s path dips to the horizon line then rises, marking the beginning of a new day.

SITU Fabrication Produces a Dev Harlan-designed Projection Wall for Y-3’s 10th Anniversary

Fabrikator
Friday, December 21, 2012
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Brought to you with support from:
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Dev Harlan’s installation for Y-3′s 10th anniversary greeted revelers with a prismatic display of light and geometry. (Courtesy SITU Fabrication)

SITU Fabrication produces and installs a Dev Harlan-designed projection wall in three weeks flat

For Adidas street fashion line Y-3’s 10th anniversary, the company commissioned New York City-based artist Dev Harlan to produce one of his distinctive 3D light installations. Y-3 wanted the installation to serve as a backdrop for a runway show at this September’s New York Fashion Week. Harlan designed a 170-foot-long wall with a deeply textural pattern of 656 skewed pyramids made prismatic by projected colored light and geometric shapes. He called on Brooklyn-based SITU Fabrication to produce and install the work in three weeks flat.

“We had worked with Harlan before on ‘Astral Fissure,’ a sculpture of folded aluminum plates that he projected light on,” said SITU partner Wes Rozen. “This time the budget and timeframe were much less, so we worked with foam core instead of aluminum.”

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Cornell NYC Tech Campus Takes a Step Forward

East
Thursday, December 20, 2012
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The Cornell Technion Campus on Roosevelt Island. (Courtesy Kilograph)

The Cornell Technion Campus on Roosevelt Island. (Courtesy Kilograph)

Manhattan Community Board 8 has approved the Cornell Tech Campus plans and launched it one step further in NYC’s public land use review process. The plan for the 12-acre site now moves forward exactly one year after Cornell University, in partnership with the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, was selected by the City to develop the applied science and engineering campus.

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A New Chapter for the New York Public Library: Foster + Partners Reveal Renovation Plans

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, December 19, 2012
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Rendering of Foster + Partners' proposed renovation of the New York Public Library. (Courtesy Foster+Partners / dbox)

Rendering of Foster + Partners’ proposed renovation of the New York Public Library. (Courtesy Foster+Partners / dbox)

New Yorkers, not to mention architecture critics, have been waiting with bated breath to see the plans for the controversial $300 million overhaul of the New York Public Library’s historic flagship branch on Fifth Avenue. And today, the designs by Foster + Partners, were finally unveiled. The renovation of the Beaux Arts-style library, completed in 1911 by Carrère and Hastings, will remove seven floors of stacks under the grand Rose Main Reading Room to make way for a 300-person workspace with an expansive atrium, balconies, floor-to-ceiling windows, bookshelves, and new areas devoted to classrooms and computer labs. As of now, interior finishes will include a combination of bronze, wood, and stone.

More after the jump.

Architect Proposes Greening the West Side Highway with the “Vine Line”

East
Wednesday, December 19, 2012
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Rendering of the Vine Line proposal for Manhattan's Upper West Side. (Courtesy Laurence Tamaccio Architect)

Rendering of the Vine Line proposal for Manhattan’s Upper West Side. (Courtesy Laurence Tamaccio Architect)

Stuck with the post-Sandy realization that buried waterfront highways are unlikely to be buried for fear of flooding, designers are looking to spruce them up, instead. The emerging “funderpass” movement hit Brooklyn last week, and now Manhattan’s Upper West Side has its own proposal, the leafy “Vine Line.”

Architect Laurence Tamaccio has proposed hiding, or rather masking, an elevated section of the West Side Highway between 61st and 72nd streets with a green scheme of vines and waterfalls. Plans had been on the table to bury the highway once and for all after a collapse in the 1970s and the contentious process of rebuilding it, but after Hurricane Sandy, that option seems in doubt. So far, Tamaccio’s plan, which also offers a grey water filtering system and a café, has been greeted with support from the community board and many local residents.

Continue reading after the jump.

Forest City Breaks Ground at Atlantic Yards’ B2 Tower, Shows Off Modular Design

East
Wednesday, December 19, 2012
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The B2 Tower sits next to Barclays Center at Atlantic Yards. (Courtesy SHoP)

The B2 Tower sits next to Barclays Center at Atlantic Yards. (Courtesy SHoP)

At Tuesday’s groundbreaking of B2, the first 32-story residential tower to be built at Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn, New Yorkers got a sneak peek at how the world’s tallest modular building will be constructed. Just beyond the podium stood what officials call the “chassis,” a steel framed box that makes up an essential structural element of the building. “You don’t need to compromise on design when it comes to modular,” said Developer Bruce Ratner.

Continue reading after the jump.

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