Product> The Comprehensive New York Design Week 2013 Roundup

East, Newsletter, Product
Monday, June 10, 2013
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The Low Collection by 13&9 Design

The Low Collection by 13&9 Design.

New York’s inaugural design week, held from May 10 through 21, was a comprehensive, two-week celebration of all things design across Manhattan island, as well as parts of Brooklyn. Showcasing the latest from industry stalwarts to emerging and independent designers—local, domestic, and international—AN culled its top picks of New York Design Week products from the ICFF show floor, Wanted Design exhibitions, showroom launches, and all events in between. 

The Low Collection
13&9 Design
The multidisciplinary Austrian design studio debuted at Wanted Design with a collection of furniture, wearable fashion and accessories, a cinematic video, and a music album. With the Low Collection (pictured above), Corian is formed into several seating styles that combine with storage vessels, all at ground level. Suitable for outdoors, furniture heights can be modified to generate a unique landscape.

Continue reading after the jump.

Grannie’s and Drones: Group Seeking to Make New York a “No Drone Zone”

East
Monday, June 10, 2013
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A (fake) sign announcing drone patrols in TriBeCa (left) and the LEAPP Drone (right).

A (fake) sign announcing drone patrols in TriBeCa (left) and the LEAPP Drone (right).

On a recent walk down Broadway near the AN offices in Lower Manhattan I was handed a flyer by The Granny Peace Brigade who were protesting in front of a building where several New York City Council Members have offices. The flyer claims in bold letters “High Tech Stop and Frisk: Domestic Drones Coming to Your Neighborhood?” It had an image of a LEAPP Drone made by Brooklyn Navy Yard–based Atair Aerospace who claim their powered paraglider “is a slow-flying, long endurance powered paraglider UAV [Unarmed Aerial Vehicle] platform that is used for ISR [Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance] and distributive operations payload delivery missions,” but that the Brigade believes could be used to monitor for loitering.

Continue reading after the jump.

Sunday> Implosion of Building 877 on Governors Island

East
Thursday, June 6, 2013
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Building 877 before (left) and after (right) demolition preparation. (Courtesy Trust for Governors Island)

Building 877 before (left) and after (right) demolition preparation. (Courtesy Trust for Governors Island)

There are probably many buildings in New York we would in our fantasies like to see blown up, but that rarely happens in this dense and intricate city. But this Sunday morning June 9 at precisely 7:36 building 877, a twelve-story former-residential structure on Governors Island will be “imploded” and turned into fill for the new adjacent landscaped park being designed by West 8 the Dutch landscape firm. Building 877 is one of the least distinguished buildings on the overbuilt island and will be much more valuable used as fill for a new public park than as a building. In this picture of the building taken just a few months ago before its facade had been taken off the grey blob oozing around the back of the structure is the base of West 8’s new landscape for the island which will open next fall. If you can’t make it to the island, you can watch a livestream of the implosion here.

Baumann Named Cooper-Hewitt Director.  Baumann Named Cooper-Hewitt Director Come June 16th the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York, the only museum in the United States devoted solely to historic and contemporary design, will welcome a new director, Caroline Baumann. Baumann, who has served as acting director of the museum since September 2012, in her new role will primarily oversee the renovation of the museum and the reinstallation of its galleries, scheduled to open in fall of 2014. “The new Cooper-Hewitt visitor experience—physical and digital—will be a global first, a transformative force for all in 2014 and beyond, impacting the way people think about and understand design,” announced Baumann in a press release. (Photo: Erin Baiano)

 

AIA Visits the Newark Waterfront to Discuss Long-term Resiliency Ideas Post-Hurricane Sandy

East
Thursday, June 6, 2013
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Damon Rich, Urban Designer for the City of Newark, gave tour of area damaged by flooding along Newark waterfront

Damon Rich, Urban Designer for the City of Newark, gave tour of area damaged by flooding along Newark waterfront (Courtesy of Nicole Anderson/AN)

This week, AN accompanied members of the American Institute of Architects NY Chapter and AIA New Jersey on a boat tour of the Passaic River to examine the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the city of Newark and to discuss recovery efforts ranging from design solutions for rebuilding to resiliency strategies. Newark, like other parts of the Tri-state area, was hit particularly hard by the super storm and will serve as a point of discussion at the Post-Sandy Regional Working Group’s workshop on July 9th with urban planners, developers, stakeholders, and architects from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

Continue reading after the jump.

Weiner and Pittsburgh: Just Friends?

East, Eavesdroplet
Thursday, June 6, 2013
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(Bridge photo: Adam Gerard / Flickr)

(Bridge photo: Adam Gerard / Flickr)

Is Anthony Weiner two-timing New York City? If you looked at the mayoral candidate’s website in late May, you might wonder whether he wants to lead parades in the Big Apple or the City of Steel. Perspicacious political reporter Michael Barbaro of the New York Post discovered that a backdrop image on Weiner’s website was not a view from Brooklyn across the East River, as it may seem on first glance, but rather a shot from the Robert Clemente Bridge leading into downtown Pittsburgh. Oops.

World Trade Center Transit Hub Beginning to Soar

East
Wednesday, June 5, 2013
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Construction at Calatrava's World Trade Center Transit Hub. (The Architect's Newspaper)

Construction at Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub. (The Architect’s Newspaper)

The World Trade Center Transportation Hub by Santiago Calatrava is the architect tells us “the image of a bird in flight.” Yesterday we took a look at the interior retail corridor that will connect with the soaring transit hub oculus, but the structure has now just appeared above the scaffolding surrounding the entire Trade Center site and its looks nothing like a soaring bird but the bare bones of a beached carcass. It can only get better!

More images after the jump.

HPD Helps Out Homeowners.  HPD Helps Out Homeowners More than six months after Hurricane Sandy swept through New York City, homeowners are still struggling with the aftermath of the storm. To help with the recovery efforts, the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) has issued a Request for Qualification looking for developers to rebuild one- to four-unit homes in the city that were damaged by the storm. Funding for the effort will come from Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery money, and all projects must meet the requirements of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The deadline for proposals is June 5, 2013.

 

Michael Van Valkenburgh Releases Details of Main Street Section of Brooklyn Bridge Park

City Terrain, East
Wednesday, June 5, 2013
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bbp_mainSt_02bbp_mainSt_03

Much has been brewing at Brooklyn Bridge Park (BBP) over the last six months starting with the opening of Pier 5 to the completion of Squibb Park Pedestrian Bridge. And now, according to DUMBO NYC, the Park, along with Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, recently unveiled plans at a community meeting to overhaul the Main Street section of its 1.3-mile waterfront stretch at the foot of the Manhattan Bridge.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Valerie Hegarty: Alternative Histories at The Brooklyn Museum

East
Wednesday, June 5, 2013
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(Courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

(Courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

Valerie Hegarty: Alternative Histories
The Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY
Through December

Valerie Hegarty: Alternative Histories is part of a series at the Brooklyn Museum that asks artists to stage the museum’s Period Rooms with site-specific art. In Hegarty’s work, featured in the Cupola House parlor and the dining room, she explores themes of colonization, Manifest Destiny, and repressed histories. Her display in the Cupola House includes a Native American patterned rug and portraits of George Washington and an anonymous Native American Chief. The rug looks to be tattered with unkempt plants and roots growing over it and the portraits appear to be engaged with one another. In the dining room, 19th-century still-life paintings come to life with fruit overflowing from their frames and being attacked by black three-dimensional crows, referencing Alfred Hitchcock and segregation, among other cultural themes.

Photo of the Day> Inside the World Trade Center Transit Hub

East
Tuesday, June 4, 2013
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wtc_transit_01

While Santiago Calatrava’s soon-to-bo-soaring transportation hub at the World Trade Center is just not starting to rise from the ground, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has given us a glimpse of what’s been going on underground, complete with the classic articulated ribs that make Calatrava’s train stations so dynamic. And look at all that marble! Sure beats your standard New York City subway stop. This view is actually part of the east-west connector that will eventually be lined with retail shops.

On View> Cambodian Rattan at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

East
Monday, June 3, 2013
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(Courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Morning Glory by Sopheap Pich. (Courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Cambodian Rattan
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Through July 7

Sopheap Pich is a contemporary Cambodian painter and sculptor known particularly for his unique rattan and bamboo sculptures. He uses these two culturally meaningful materials to create organically flowing, three-dimensional, open-weave forms. Most of his works emulate the naturally fluid forms of human anatomy and plant life. For example, “Morning Glory,” a mesh sculpture inspired by the blooming vine that served as an important source of nourishment for the Cambodian population during the 1970s, gently slinks across the floor before gracefully opening into a delicate flower. This exhibition features ten of the Cambodian artist’s most important works, which appear to be weightless, but deliver deep and complex statements about culture, faith, nature, the rich, and the sometimes-tragic history of Cambodia.

More images after the jump.

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