Letter to the Editor> Master Architect or No, Gehry is Wrong About Los Angeles

Letter to the Editor, West
Friday, August 30, 2013
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(Joel Mann / Flickr; Montage by AN)

(Joel Mann / Flickr; Montage by AN)

[ Editor's Note: The following is a reader-submitted comment from the AN Blog in response to the post, “Gehry Lets Loose on Los Angeles, Downtown Ambitions,” which cites an interview Frank Gehry did with Los Angeles Magazine. It appeared as a letter to the editor in a recent print edition, AN07_08.14.2013. Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

The only thing that makes Los Angeles unique is that so much of it was built during the auto era (albeit on an infrastructural framework established during the interurban rail era). Different parts of Los Angeles were developed in a manner that was identical to how other cities across North America were being developed at the same time. The same succession of transportation, construction, and development technologies created a downtown in Los Angeles that is nearly indistinguishable from portions of San Francisco, Chicago, and Manhattan.

Continue reading after the jump.

New Mural Ordinance Opens Floodgates For Art in Los Angeles

West
Friday, August 30, 2013
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Untitled, by Mister Cartoon & El T Loko (Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles)

Untitled, by Mister Cartoon & El T Loko (Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles)

Finally. Los Angeles’ City Council on Wednesday passed a new mural ordinance, legalizing murals on private buildings after a decade of banning them. Of course would-be public artists still have to go through an extensive permitting process, and pay a$60 fee, but if they’re persistent they can finally go crazy. That is, as long as their murals don’t contain commercial messages.

“It’s a big victory and we’re thrilled,” said Isabel Rojas-Williams, executive director of the Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles. The group has been protecting the city’s murals and muralists since 1987. “Despite the recent restrictions, the city has remained one of the country’s mural capitals.”

Don’t believe us? Behold a selection below of our favorite (finally-sanctioned) murals from around the City of Angels, courtesy of the Mural Conservancy. They range from political to historical to street art / graffiti, to, well…the undefinable. Read More

Studios at the Ranch: Disney Makes Move to “Hollywood North”

West
Thursday, August 29, 2013
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Studios at the Ranch (Disney)

Studios at the Ranch (Disney)

On Tuesday, Los Angeles County’s Board of Supervisors voted to approve Disney’s huge new TV and film production facility on the Golden Oak Ranch near Santa Clarita. The project is being master planned by LA-based firm, Johnson Fain, and the 58-acre “Studios at the Ranch” will include more than 500,000 square feet of studios, sound stages, offices, writers and producers “bungalows” and other developments.

Continue reading after the jump.

With Revitalization Plans On Hold, Students Rethink the Los Angeles River

City Terrain, Dean's List, West
Wednesday, August 28, 2013
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LA River fashion park (BinBin Ma)

LA River fashion park (Binbin Ma)

While pathways and parks are springing up near the Los Angeles River, plans to redevelop and green the concrete stretch still need the support of the Army Corps of Engineers and the federal government. In the meantime, students from landscape architecture firm SWA’s Summer Student Program have developed these mind bending proposals for the concrete expanse. Most not only remove the concrete, which was put in place in the 1930s, but provide walkable spaces, take down walls and other barriers, and add housing and additional program.

Continue reading after the jump.

Ten Case Study Houses Listed on National Register

West
Thursday, August 22, 2013
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Case Study House #22 (Tim Street-Porter)

Case Study House #22 (Tim Street-Porter)

Thanks to the efforts of the Los Angeles Conservancy‘s Modern Committee, ten homes from Southern California’s Case Study House program have been added to the National Register of Historic Places. Launched by Arts + Architecture magazine in 1945, the Case Study program emphasized experiment and affordability, and produced some of the most famous houses in U.S. history, including the Eames House (Case Study #8), and Pierre Koenig’s Stahl House (Case Study #22).

Read More

wHY Architecture to Convert Masonic Temple Into a New Art Museum in Los Angeles

West
Thursday, August 15, 2013
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Millard Sheets' Masonic Temple. (Courtesy Google)

Millard Sheets’ Masonic Temple. (Courtesy Google)

Culver City firm wHY Architecture has been selected to design a new art museum in Los Angeles for Maurice and Paul Marciano, the founders of clothing empire Guess? Inc. The museum will be located inside a marble-clad, four story Scottish Rite Masonic Temple on Wilshire Boulevard near Lucerne Boulevard.

When retrofitted in 2015, the austere building, originally designed by legendary artist Millard Sheets, will contain 90,000 square feet of exhibition space, showing off the Marciano’s impressive collection, which will be open for “periodic exhibitions for the public.”

wHY has also designed L&M Arts and Perry Rubenstein Gallery in LA, an expansion of the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, and the Tyler Museum of Art in Texas. They’re also working on a Studio Art Hall at Pomona College outside of LA.

SOM’s Los Angeles Federal Courthouse Breaks Ground

West
Tuesday, August 13, 2013
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(courtesy SOM)

(courtesy SOM)

SOM’s first major project in Los Angeles in years, the Los Angeles U.S. Courthouse, broke ground last week. Those in attendance included new LA mayor Eric Garcetti, who’s just beginning his rounds of ceremonial events around the city. The downtown commission, located at First Street and Broadway, was awarded late last year.

The 600,000 square foot building will include 24 courtrooms and 32 judicial chambers and will house the U.S. District Court and the Central District of California, among other facilities. Renderings reveal a serrated, glassy cube resting on a narrow, solid pedestal, and a sky-lit central courtyard at the building’s core. The project is pursuing a LEED Platinum rating. The design build team also includes Clark Construction and Jacobs Project Management.

Completion is scheduled for summer 2016.

Los Angeles Names First-Ever Chief Sustainability Officer

Shft+Alt+Del, West
Wednesday, August 7, 2013
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Matt Petersen (Global Green)

Matt Petersen. (Global Green)

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti last week named Global Green CEO Matt Petersen as the city’s first-ever Chief Sustainability Officer. Peterson, according to the mayor’s office, will be tasked with “making the city’s departments greener and neighborhoods healthier, and fulfilling Garcetti’s campaign promise of creating 20,000 new green jobs.” Peterson should also have his hands full, not only getting each city department to cooperate, but on thorny issues like regulation of the city’s ports and transit corridors.

Global Green, if you’re wondering, is a non-profit dedicated to “advocating for smart solutions to global warming including green building for affordable housing, schools, cities and communities that save money, improve health and create green jobs.” Since its founding almost 20 years ago it has organized design competitions, testified in congress,  hosted awards, and raised money on behalf of green causes.

Is That a Steven Holl in Downtown Los Angeles? No, It’s Medallion 2.0

International, Newsletter, West
Monday, August 5, 2013
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Medallion 2.0 (Kevin Tsai Architecture)

Medallion 2.0 (Kevin Tsai Architecture)

While it’s been well-documented that China has been “borrowing from” U.S. designs for some time, it appears that relationship is starting to go both ways. Downtown Los Angeles is ready to get a new residential project that bears a striking resemblance to Steven Holl’s Linked Hybrid apartment complex in Beijing. Note the porous, gridded facade and the glassy skybridges, to name just a couple of  similarities. The mixed-use Medallion 2.0, designed by Kevin Tsai Architecture, would be located off the corner of Third and Main Streets, reported downtown blogger Brigham Yen. It’s scheduled to break ground in 2015 and include 400 rental units, a theater,  retail, and over half an acre of green space. We’ll keep you posted on more Asian imports as they no doubt continue to arrive.

(Steven Holl's Linked Hybrid. (Wojtek Gurak / Flickr)

(Steven Holl’s Linked Hybrid. (Wojtek Gurak / Flickr)

Inside Ball-Nogues Studio’s Canadian Vault

Fabrikator
Friday, August 2, 2013
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator

Ball-Nogues Studio engineered 930 reflective stainless steel spheres for a site-specific installation in Edmonton, Alberta. (Benjamin Ball)

Ball-Nogues Studio manipulated 930 reflective stainless steel spheres for a site-specific installation in Edmonton, Alberta. (Benjamin Ball)

In 2011, a major expansion to Edmonton, Alberta’s Quesnell Bridge generated an ongoing effort to enliven the landscape surrounding the overpass, which connects the northwest and southwest portions of Canada’s fifth largest city. A resultant public art commission from the Edmonton Arts Council for Los Angeles–based multidisciplinary design-build fabricators Ball-Nogues Studio called for an engaging installation along the south side of the North Saskatchewan River, which sees a live load of 120,000 vehicles each day.

While brainstorming the project, it was apparent to the firm’s principal and designer in charge Benjamin Ball that the areas immediately surrounding the bridge were not carefully considered by passengers. “It was a sort of no-man’s-land between the transportation infrastructure and the landscape,” he recently told AN. Drawing inspiration from the mundane—sand piles, gravel, and detritus from the trucking industry—and the majestic—talus and scree formations enveloping the base of surrounding cliffs—Ball and the studio’s cofounder Nogues applied their knowledge of sphere packing to echo the angle of repose of natural and man-made mounds. Read More

Gehry Lets Loose on Los Angeles, Downtown Ambitions

Eavesdroplet, West
Thursday, August 1, 2013
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biennale_frank_gehry

Writer Anne Taylor Fleming recently interviewed Frank Gehry for Los Angeles Magazine, getting a glimpse into what the architect thinks about Los Angeles and the meaning of his work there. Gehry tells Fleming about some of the missed planning and architectural opportunities that continue to challenge the city, including the push to make a bona fide downtown, which he believes stems from clinging to old ideas about what a city should be.

Continue reading after the jump.

KPF Working on Major Exterior Redesign for Peterson Automotive Museum

Newsletter, West
Monday, July 29, 2013
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One of KPF's conceptions for the Petersen. (Courtesy KPF)

One of KPF’s conceptions for the Petersen. (Courtesy KPF)

LACMA isn’t the only museum in town planning a significant redo in Los Angeles. The Petersen Automotive Museum, just across and down Wilshire Boulevard from LACMA, has retained Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) to imagine a radical redesign of the exterior of the museum’s home, a former department store. Museum officials have stated the time has come to finally retrofit the building to be more suitable for its program. This early design sketch, above, is just one of several that KPF has been presenting to museum directors.

Continue reading after the jump.

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