Obit> Stanley Marsh, 1938–2014

Art, Obit, Southwest
Wednesday, June 18, 2014
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Texas' quirky Cadillac Ranch installation. (Doug Wighton / Flickr)

Texas’ quirky Cadillac Ranch installation. (Doug Wighton / Flickr)

Amarillo, Texas philanthropist Stanley Marsh—a major figure on creating two of the most iconic art works in America—considered himself an “artist and a prankster.” The patron of both Cadillac Ranch and Robert Smithson’s Amarillo Ramp (1973), the third in a trilogy a trilogy of spirals that also included Spiral Jetty (1970) and Broken Circle/Spiral Hill (1971), Marsh was an heir to his family’s oil-and-gas fortune.

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Inwood Hill’s Land Artist Young Jee Passes Away.  The land art of Young Lee. Young Jee, the land artist who carved his work into earth of Inwood Hill has died, DNAinfo reports. Far from the galleries flanking the High Line, Jee’s quiet compositions served as an anecdote to high concept, in keeping with the park which is the largest natural tract of land in Manhattan. (Photo: Tom Stoelker / AN)

 

Tacha Sculpture Saved!.  Tacha Sculpture Saved. (Courtesy Athena Tacha) In an about face, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie reversed a decision to demolish Athena Tacha’s Green Acres, a site specific installation at the State’s Department of Environmental Protection. Tacha is largely credited with bringing the land art movement into the social context of architecture. The 1985 sculpture’s staying power remains contingent upon private funding to restore the piece. With Art Pride New Jersey, Preservation New Jersey, and The Cultural Landscape Foundation all rallying to the cause, Green Acres looks like it will remain the place to be.

 

On View> Nancy Holt: Sightlines at the Graham Foundation

Midwest
Monday, October 24, 2011
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Nancy Holt's "Sun Tunnels," 1978. (Courtesy Graham Foundation)

Nancy Holt's "Sun Tunnels," 1978. (Courtesy Graham Foundation)

NANCY HOLT: Sightlines
The Graham Foundation
Four West Burton Place
Chicago
Through December 17

Beginning her artistic career in the 1960s, Nancy Holt helped pioneer the Land Art movement alongside artists like Richard Serra and Robert Smithson, who was her husband and occasional collaborator. Nancy Holt: Sightlines at the Graham Foundation presents documentation of over 40 of her monumental and ecologically-focused projects through photography, film, and artist’s books, revealing Holt’s eloquent mode of navigating the intersection of art and nature.

In Sun Tunnels, an installation and 1978 film (above), sunlight interacts with four concrete tunnels in the Great Basin Desert in Utah, exemplifying Holt’s interest in space and time by highlighting how the passage of the sun impacts each tunnel differently and in a way specific to that location. In addition to presenting previously unseen materials from the artist’s archive, the exhibition, which concentrates on the Holt’s work between 1966 and 1980, features the documentary Pine Barrens (1975) about undeveloped land in New Jersey, and documentation of the projects Swamp (1971, in collaboration with Smithson), Boomerang (1973, in collaboration with Serra), and the multi-monitor installation Points of View (1974), a piece that underscores the different perspectives we bring to viewing the landscape.

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