New Design Trends and Policies Help City Dwellers Touch Water

East
Wednesday, August 15, 2012
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The Field Operations' new plaza fronting New York by Ghery. (Stoelker/AN)

The Field Operations’ new plaza fronting New York by Ghery features flush fountains. (Stoelker/AN)

An interesting trend to hit landscape architecture in recent years is borderless fountains, where water flows flush with the pavement. If so inclined, visitors can kick off their shoes and stroll though damp pavers. Such fountains can be found by Field Operations with Diller, Scofidio + Renfro on the High Line, Digsau’s Sister Cities Park in Philly, and Field Operations’ recently completed plaza fronting New York by Gehry. The trend seems to speak to city dwellers need to touch water.

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The Cloisters’ Tower Cluster is Back in Washington Heights.  Quadriad Realty's plans to build a series of towers near The Cloisters has resurfaced. After falling a bit off the radar, the folks from Quadriad Reality are back in Washington Heights with a revised plan to build a cluster of towers just down the hill from The Cloisters, DNAinfo reports. The 34-story towers will be an anomaly in a neighborhood where the the average apartment block runs from about ten to twelve stories. Just up Broadway, Peter Gluck is planning to build a modular building, Steven Holl’s Campbell Sports Center is taking shape, and Field Operations’ contentious park has broken ground.

 

Columbia Builds Holl-y Hell in Inwood

East
Wednesday, August 11, 2010
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The Campbell Sports Center designed by Stephen Holl has some neighbors ready to punt.

Can Columbia build anything without causing a ruckus? There is, of course, the famous gym proposed for Riverside Park that triggered the 1968 riots, and more recently the huge fight over its 17-acre Manhattanville expansion. Now the Times is reporting a “teapot-size storm” surrounding the university’s proposal to build a new athletic center within its complex in Inwood. According to the Gray Lady, the issues are the same as anywhere in Manhattan: light, views, and context. “It does not relate well to the community,” said Gail Addiss, 61, an architect who lives opposite Baker Field. “It’s similar to Frank Gehry architecture — large metal things whose glare is going to cause more brightness to reflect into people’s windows.”

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