Chicago Mulls Zoning Changes To Ward Off Mountains of Petcoke

Midwest, Newsletter
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
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Petcoke stored along the Calumet River on Chicago's Southeast Side, between 106th and 100th streets. (Josh Mogerman via Flickr)

Petcoke stored along the Calumet River on Chicago’s Southeast Side, between 106th and 100th streets. (Josh Mogerman / Flickr)

Piles of dusty, black waste from coal and petroleum processing have been piling up on Chicago’s southeast side, angering residents and prompting Mayor Rahm Emanuel to weigh in on the contentious environmental issue.

The Sun-Times has reported that Emanuel will introduce an ordinance at next month’s City Council meeting banning new storage facilities for so-called petcoke—a byproduct of the oil refinery process that can be sold overseas. It’s a step back from an outright ban proposed in December by Alderman Edward Burke, whose constituents were outraged by black dust clouds wafting from uncovered piles of petcoke along the Calumet River. Read More

Urban Planner Named New President of the Brooklyn Navy Yard

East, Shft+Alt+Del
Tuesday, August 20, 2013
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Aerial view of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Courtesy Brooklyn Navy Yard)

Aerial view of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Courtesy Brooklyn Navy Yard)

David Ehrenberg has been appointed president and CEO of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, a 300-acre, former ship-building base turned city-owned industrial park. Ehrenberg is currently an executive vice president at the New York City Economic Development Corporation (EDC). Over the last decade the Navy Yard has emerged as an essential zone for preserving and growing New York’s manufacturing sector, especially small businesses. The Yard currently includes 4.5 million square feet of leasable space, with an occupancy rate of 99 percent.

Continue reading after the jump.

Brooklyn Navy Yards’ Concrete Monolith To See Major Renovation

East
Wednesday, March 13, 2013
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Building 77 at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (emma.maria / Flickr)

Building 77 at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (emma.maria / Flickr)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has emerged as one of those rare, post-industrial-era success stories. The former shipyard, which closed in 1966, is now home to a mix of industries such as construction, cleantech, metal fabrication, film production, design, contracting, and even urban agriculture. The Wall Street Journal reported that the non-profit Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corp. will soon announce an $80 million renovation of Building 77, a monolithic concrete former ammunition depot and the largest structure on the 300-acre park.

Continue reading after the jump.

Foxconn Said to Be Considering Investment in American Manufacturing

International
Thursday, November 15, 2012
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A Foxconn factory in Shenzhen, China. (yandulangzi在线/Google)

A Foxconn factory in Shenzhen, China. (yandulangzi在线/Google)

Much has been made of the decline of American industry and, more recently, the rise of small-scale urban industry, but one of the largest international manufacturers, Taiwan-based Foxconn, could change the industrial scene completely if it decides to build factories in the United States. The Guardian reports that Foxconn is considering Detroit and Los Angeles for potential outposts thanks to rising costs overseas, but the company infamous for manufacturing Apple products among others at its 800,000-worker-strong Chinese facilities would have to adapt to radically different American ways of working.

Continue reading after the jump.

S.Alt City Mural in Syracuse Blends Industrial Heritage With Modern Technology

East
Tuesday, October 16, 2012
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S.Alt City mural in Syracuse.

S.Alt City mural in Syracuse.

This Syracuse mural project, S.Alt City, was sent to AN over the summer just as we were preparing our live coverage of the Venice Biennale and went unreported in the paper. But the mural by Cheng and Snyder Architects is a smart project that deserves more attention than it has received. The mural depicts a local waterside salt barge that alludes back to Syracuse’s industrial heritage but it also imbedded QR codes throughout the work. These QR codes are becoming more ubiquitous in the world of art making and were in fact used in the Russian pavilion at the recent Venice Biennale in a grandiose and very expensive installation in their pavilion.

Continue reading after the jump.

Deborah Berke’s Yale Studio Exploring Urban Manufacturing (and Bourbon)

Dean's List, Midwest, National
Wednesday, February 8, 2012
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A stack of whiskey barrels. (Project 404 / Flickr)

A stack of whiskey barrels. (Project 404 / Flickr)

American manufacturing may be on the rocks, but Deborah Berke, principal at Deborah Berke & Partners, believes that by adding a little bourbon, one Kentucky city can make an industrial comeback. Berke is leading a graduate studio at Yale exploring the future of boutique manufacturing in the United States and using an urban distillery in Louisville as a case study.

Continue reading after the jump.

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