Wait, what? New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has never been on the High Line

The High Line. (Flickr / HorsePunchKid)

The High Line. (Flickr / HorsePunchKid)

When the final phase of the High Line opened in September, Mayor de Blasio was not there to celebrate—neither was his Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver, reported the New York Times. The mayor was off to Pittsburgh that day and Silver apparently had a scheduling conflict so deputies for both men were sent instead. But if the mayor would have made it to the opening, it would have been his first time on the High Line. Ever.

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Unveiled> Singaporean Architect Brings Wavy Design to the High Line

515 High Line. (Courtesy SCDA Architects)

515 High Line. (Courtesy SCDA Architects)

Singaporean architect Soo K. Chan of SCDA Architects is the latest to join an internationally renowned group of architects building along New York’s High Line in Chelsea. Chan isn’t settling for just one building, however. Two new buildings are set to rise just blocks from towers by Norman Foster and Zaha Hadid, and feature differing aesthetics that tap into the luxury market that has skyrocketed in the area.

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Studio Gang’s New York City “Solar Carve” Tower Moving Forward in Smaller Form

Studio Gang's Initial rendering for the "Solar Carve." (Courtesy Studio Gang)

Studio Gang’s Initial rendering for the “Solar Carve.” (Courtesy Studio Gang)

Studio Gang’s first New York City tower appears to be moving forward, albeit a little shorter than originally envisioned. Initial plans called for a 213-foot tall, 180,000-square-foot office tower—known as the “Solar Carve”—that would have been 34 percent larger than what is currently allowed on the site. After it became clear that wasn’t going to fly with the NYC Board of Standards and Appeals (BSA), the Carve’s developer, William Gottlieb Real Estate, withdrew its application leaving the fate of the project in jeopardy.

Continue reading after the jump.

High time for a High Line: Sydney Breaks Ground on New Elevated Park

Following it’s opening in 2009, urban planners all over the world have been keen on acquiring their own versions of New York’s much-lauded High Line. Sydney is the latest city to enter the fray, selecting a 500-meter stretch of abandoned railway as a foundation for the Goods Line, an urban park and public space, replete with bike paths, study pods and outdoor workspaces catering to local students.

Many more images after the jump.

New York City Zoning Board Burns Studio Gang’s “Solar Carve” Tower Along the High Line

Development, East, Midwest, News
Friday, February 21, 2014
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(Courtesy Studio Gang)

(Courtesy Studio Gang)

Chicago’s Studio Gang Architects announced plans for their New York debut in late 2012. The proposed building, located near the High Line along 10th Avenue between 13th and 14th streets, features a serrated edge that maximizes daylight on the elevated park next door—Jeanne Gang called it “solar carving.”

But the legal path to realizing that faceted glass facade had some unexpected kinks of its own.

Continue reading after the jump.

We’re Bowled Over by James Corner Field Operations’s Plans For the High Line

City Terrain, East
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
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A large, green bowl, dubbed the Spur, will float above the intersection 10th Avenue and 30th Street as part of the final phase of the High Line(Image James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Courtesy the City of New York)

A large, green bowl, dubbed the Spur, will float above the intersection 10th Avenue and 30th Street (Image James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Courtesy the City of New York)

This week, Friends of the High Line revealed the design concept for the third and final section of the High Line with a tantalizing set of renderings from James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Beginning at the intersection of 10th Avenue and West 30th Street, the latest addition, known as the High Line at the Rail Yards, will wrap westward around Related Companies’ impending Hudson Yards mega-development before culminating on 34th Street between 11th and 12th Avenues.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rick Cook of COOKFOX Discusses His Proposed Building Along the High Line

East
Tuesday, October 29, 2013
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(Courtesy DBOX)

(Courtesy DBOX)

A new “class A” office building adjacent to the High Line, 510 West 22nd Street, is now in the planning stage and the developers have released a video of its designer, Rick Cook of COOKFOX Architects, describing the building. But is anyone worried that the High Line may become a dark walkway through forest of buildings? Not Cook, who bases his design on the public qualities of the old elevated rail line that transformed 10th Avenue from the “end of the world to the center of the universe.” But has there been a bigger boon to real estate development in New York since Central Park?

Carol Bove’s Grand Urban Pedestals: The High Line and MoMA

East
Friday, October 11, 2013
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BOVE_Carol_Celeste_PhotoTimothySchenck_CourtesyFriendsoftheHighLine_3 copy

Celeste by Carol Bove (photo: Timothy Schenck)

Walking along the farthest block of West 34th Street, navigating past queues waiting for MegaBuses going to Boston, Philadelphia, and other cities, is a small white tent behind a chain-link fence. There begins another journey to a world that will exist only until next May. It is the High Line at the Rail Yards, the last stretch of the beloved park between West 30 and 34th streets, still raw before it joins the two completed sections running to Gansevoort Street.

You are first greeted by a dense, green self-seeded landscape, including a tree ripe with green apples. As you gingerly step over battered wooden rail ties and metal tracks, the vista opens up to the portion called the Spur, which runs parallel to the Hudson River with only the West Side Highway in between. Ships pass by, helicopters land, the Javits Center, the Starrett Lehigh Building, and the new Hudson Yards construction site surround you—and then you encounter the first of seven sculptures by Carol Bove sited along the tracks. Read More

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In Construction> High Line Construction Reaches into Hudson Yards

East
Friday, February 15, 2013
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Hudson Yards broke ground late last year, but the Kohn Pedersen Fox-designed tower that will one day be the headquarters of fashion-label Coach isn’t the only construction activity causing a buzz on the 26-acre site on Manhattan’s West Side. Wrapping around the south and west sides of the Hudson Yards site, construction crews are busy building out the final segment of the High Line, including sandblasting and refurbishing the steel viaduct, repainting the steel structure’s beams, girders, and columns with the High Line’s signature “Greenblack” color, and removing and storing existing railroad tracks. Landscape construction is expected to begin later this spring.

The Friends of the High Line recently stopped by the construction site with photographer Timothy Schenck to take these photos of work in progress. Be sure to take a look at James Corner Field Operations’ design for the final segment here.

More photos after the jump.

Friends of the High Line Co-Founder Robert Hammond Stepping Down.  Robert Hammond. (Courtesy Friends of the High Line) Robert Hammond and Joshua David met at a community board meeting in 1999. The future of the then rusting and decrepit High Line was on the docket, and it was very much in doubt. The two joined forces to create Friends of the High Line, a non-profit that led the charge for the preservation and transformation of the disused line rail into a linear park. Today, Hammond announced he will step down as the organization’s executive director, saying, in a statement, “My passion has always been in starting new things, and I am looking forward to pursuing whatever my next project may be. In my heart I am an entrepreneur.”

 

Video> Renzo Piano’s Whitney Museum Time-Lapse Construction Along the High Line

East
Thursday, January 24, 2013
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Renzo Piano’s new Whitney Museum and adjacent maintenance building have been quickly rising between the High Line and the Hudson River in Manhattan, topping out on December 17, 2012. Now, the Whitney has condensed the entire construction sequence from its groundbreaking in October 2011 up through January 14 into one easy-to-watch time-lapse video. And if you just can’t get enough of the Whitney under construction, you can watch live on this webcam or take a virtual fly-through of the new museum here. [Via Curbed.]

Hudson Yards Breaks Ground as Manhattan’s Largest Mega-Development

East, Newsletter
Thursday, December 6, 2012
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The towers of Hudson Yards. (Courtesy Related)

The towers of Hudson Yards. (Courtesy Related)

Tuesday morning, New York’s top power brokers gathered in a muddy lot on Manhattan’s west side to mark the official groundbreaking of the 26-acre Hudson Yards mega-development. The dramatic addition to the New York skyline will comprise a completely new neighborhood of glass skyscrapers at the northern terminus of the High Line. The South Tower, the first structure to be built and the future headquarters of fashion-label Coach, will rise on the site’s southeast corner at 30th Street and 10th Avenue, where Related CEO Stephen Ross, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and others celebrated the first turning of dirt as a large caisson machine bored into the ground.

Continue reading after the jump.

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