AIA Infographic: Designing Community, Shaping Health

Design, National, Newsletter
Thursday, January 30, 2014
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AIA INFOGRAPHIC (COURTESY AIA)

(COURTESY AIA)

Over time, architects, designers, and engineers have demonstrated how the structural significance and quality of architectural design impacts the built environment and the quality of life of people residing within it. To drive that point home, the AIA has released an infographic showing architecture’s key role in the enhancement of individuals’ physical and mental well-being.

The interactive charts explore how design plays significantly more than an aesthetic function. It is not solely about linear or convex shapes, about geometric structures or innovative materials. Rather, the importance of architecture lies in the choices that architects make when designing buildings in order to positively affect the quality of life of its users.

Continue reading after the jump.

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St. Louis Architect Wants Public Art for Public Health

Midwest
Tuesday, December 3, 2013
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The "Space-Time Transformation Footbridge"  is coated with a photovoltaic film to generate electricity to power shape changes and light the bridge at night. (Michael Jantzen)

The “Space-Time Transformation Footbridge” is coated with a photovoltaic film to generate electricity to power shape changes and light the bridge at night. (Michael Jantzen)

One St. Louis architect thinks his city’s public art needs a shot in the arm. Michael Jantzen says public art should further public health, and his work—interactive designs replete with solar film and meant to encourage exercise—shows how.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bloomberg Urges New Yorkers to Take the Stairs

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
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(Ludovic Bertron / Flickr)

(Ludovic Bertron / Flickr)

When confronted with the option to ride the elevator or muster up enough energy to walk up multiple flights of steps to a destination, most of us opt for the elevator. But according to the Bloomberg Administration, we might choose differently when surrounded by a built environment that encourages physical activity. In response to our country’s mounting obesity crisis, Mayor Bloomberg has recently changed design standards, launching a new series of pro-health and anti-obesity initiatives that promote physical activity in buildings and public spaces.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City Targets Buildings’ Heating Oil to Improve Air Quality

East
Wednesday, July 11, 2012
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Hazardous smoke rises from a building using heavy oils. (Courtesy Environmental Defense Fund/Isabelle SIlverman)

Hazardous smoke rises from a building using heavy oils. (Courtesy Environmental Defense Fund/Isabelle SIlverman)

What’s your building burning? Some 10,000 buildings in New York City are stuck on the dirty stuff—heavy heating oils—to keep warm, which is polluting the air across the city. But as of the first of this month, the city has begun to phase out these feuls in favor of more environmentally-friendly and health-conscious alternatives. As part of plaNYC’s initiative to remake New York City with the cleanest air of any major U.S. city, NYC Clean Heat aims to achieve a 50 percent reduction in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) by the end of 2013.

Continue reading after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Thinkin’ Lincoln, Green Critic, Exhausted Cyclists

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, September 27, 2011
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IBM's THINK Exhibit "Data Wall"

Thinkin’ Lincoln. IBM is taking over the Lincoln Center through October 23rd with one of the biggest interactive technology exhibits in the city: IBM Think Exhibit. Highlights include the 123-feet long “data wall” and a forest of 40 seven-foot media panels. More at Inhabitat.

Bronx Beauty. The New York Times‘ new archi-critic, Michael Kimmelman, has penned his first review, shying away from the iconic, gleaming projects of his predecessor, instead beginning with Via Verde affordable housing in the South Bronx, which may help him demonstrate that quality trumps quantity, especially in moral debates of architecture.

Biking Sacrifice. Atlantic Cities reported that cyclists in urban environments might want to be wary of cars for more than just accident risks: harmful automobile emissions create a hazard for cyclists as well. According to new research, bikers inhale more than twice the amount of black carbon particles as pedestrians do in the same trip.

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