Restoring Wright: A Preservation Master Plan for Taliesin West

Preservation, West
Friday, February 7, 2014
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TALIESIN WEST WAS FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT'S WINTER HOME, STUDIO, AND ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL (FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT FOUNDATION, PHOTO BY ANDREW PIELAGE)

TALIESIN WEST WAS FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S WINTER HOME, STUDIO, AND ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL (FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT FOUNDATION, PHOTO BY ANDREW PIELAGE)

After almost eight decades of constant use, Taliesin West is ready for a makeover. The Scottsdale, Arizona site was Frank Lloyd Wright’s winter home, studio, and architecture school. Today, the campus houses the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture and is also a popular tourist destination, with over 100,000 visitors annually. Now, time, climate, and footsteps have taken their toll on the landmark.

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Wright for Wraxall? Bid To Construct an Unbuilt Masterwork in England Quashed

THE DR. HUGH & MRS. JUDITH PRATT RESIDENCE, PROPOSED FOR WRAXALL, ENGLAND, IS BASED ON A 1947 DESIGN BY FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT (NICK HIRST, RIBA/DR. HUGH PRATT)

THE DR. HUGH & MRS. JUDITH PRATT RESIDENCE, PROPOSED FOR WRAXALL, ENGLAND, IS BASED ON A 1947 DESIGN BY FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT (NICK HIRST, RIBA/DR. HUGH PRATT)

Fifty-four years after Frank Lloyd Wright’s death, the village of Wraxall, England just killed plans to build one of the architect’s designs. Last August, Dr. Hugh Pratt, a local parish councillor, petitioned the planning board to build a Wright-inspired house on greenbelt land. Some area residents argued that the building would elevate the community’s aesthetics, but others worried that the house would set a precedent for further intrusions into the greenbelt.

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Wright or Wrong? Debate over Massaro House Authenticity Rekindled

East
Friday, November 16, 2012
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Frank Lloyd Wright's Massaro House. (Ahalife)

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Massaro House. (Ahalife)

The story goes like this: In 1949 an engineer named A.K. Chahroudi commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home on Petra Island in Lake Mahopac, New York, which Chahroudi owned. But the $50,000 price tag on the 5,000 square foot house was more than Chahroudi could afford, so Wright designed him a smaller, more affordable cottage elsewhere on the island.

Fast forward to 1996 when Joseph Massaro, a sheet metal contractor, bought the island for $700,000, a sale that also included Wright’s original yet unfinished plans. Though he says he only intended to spruce up the existing cottage and not build anything new, one can hardly fault Massaro for wanting to follow through on a home Wright once said would eclipse Falling Water. In 2000 Massaro sold his business and hired Thomas A. Heinz, an architect and Wright historian, to complete and update the design, a move that incensed the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, who promptly sued him, stating he couldn’t claim the house was a true Wright, but was only “inspired” by him.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian House and Pavilion

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, September 12, 2012
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(Courtesy Guggenheim / Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation)

(Courtesy Guggenheim / Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation)

A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright’s
Usonian House and Pavilion
Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue
Through February 13, 2013

In the years just before Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum forever altered the face Fifth Avenue, the directors of the museum went on a charm offensive. In 1953, they presented the exhibition Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright. The show introduced Wright’s Usonian House to New Yorkers by building the Prairie-style home on the construction site of where the architect’s tour de force museum would soon rise. Now through February 13 the museum presents a scaled-down version of the exhibition, which originally included the Usonian and a dramatic Wright-designed pavilion holding models, drawings, and watercolors by the master. This exhibition, A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian House and Pavilion, celebrates the two structures that won over a somewhat skeptical New York audience to the work of America’s modern master.

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