Red-Rock-Inspired Headquarters by ajc

Architecture, Envelope, West
Wednesday, September 10, 2014
.
Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
ajc architects outfitted Petzl North America's new headquarters with a southwestern-hued envelope. (©Dana Sohm)

ajc architects outfitted Petzl North America’s new headquarters with a southwestern-hued envelope. (Dana Sohm)

Earth-toned GFRC panels and contrasting metal wrap Petzl’s new North American hub.

When Petzl executives decided to move the climbing and caving equipment company’s North American headquarters from Clearfield to West Valley City, Utah, they sought an opportunity not just to expand, but to design a facility that would reflect the brand’s mission. “The two words we kept hearing from them were verticality and light,” recalled ajc architects founding principal Jill A. Jones. “The types of products they design really have to deal with the vertical world.” Working with a southwestern palette inspired by Petzl corporation founder and president Paul Petzl’s recent visits to Mesa Verde National Park and Machu Picchu, the architects designed a combination administrative, training, and distribution center whose mesa-like bottom stories and punctuating tower appear as if carved out of desert rock. Read More

Marlon Blackwell Puts on a Clinic with Vol Walker Hall

Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
Marlon Blackwell Architect's Steven L. Anderson Design Center embodies the recent history of architectural technology in its massing and materials. (Timothy Hursley)

Marlon Blackwell Architect’s Steven L. Anderson Design Center embodies the recent history of architectural technology in its massing and materials. (Timothy Hursley)

University of Arkansas  addition celebrates the future with a contemporary rewrite of Neoclassicism.

As head of the architecture department and distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture, Marlon Blackwell was uniquely qualified to oversee the renovation and expansion of the school’s home, Vol Walker Hall. To unite the school’s landscape architecture, architecture, and interior design departments under one roof for the first time, Blackwell’s eponymous firm designed a contemporary west wing to mirror the east bar on the existing Beaux-Arts style building, constructed in the 1930s as the university library. But the Steven L. Anderson Design Center—which tied for Building of the Year in AN‘s 2014 Best of Design Awards—is more than a container for 37,000 square feet of new studio, seminar, and office space. It is also a teaching tool, a lesson in the evolution of architectural technology writ in concrete, limestone, glass, steel, and zinc.
Read More

Did Boston’s Millennium Tower Break a “Record” With Its 36-Hour Concrete Pour?

Boston's Millennium Tower. (Courtesy Handel Architects)

Boston’s Millennium Tower. (Courtesy Handel Architects)

After a continuous 36-hour concrete pour last weekend, Boston’s Millennium Tower is ready to rise above the city skyline. The day-and-a-half-long pour of 6,000 cubic yards for the Handel Architects–designed project is being called a “record concrete pour” by local press—and it probably is, at least in terms of hours spent pouring. But if you crunch the numbers, as AN did, the pour in Beantown reveals that the tower’s concrete took its sweet, sweet time to flow. We’ll explain.

Read More

Shanghai Company 3-D Prints Village of Humble Concrete Homes

International, News, Technology
Thursday, April 3, 2014
.
house-3d-printed-shanghai-8

(Courtesy 3ders.org)

A Shanghai building company has erected a small village of pitched-roof, 3-D printed structures—in about a day. WinSun Decoration Design Engineering Co is behind the series of humble buildings, a fully fabricated unit is expected to cost less than $5,000. The homes were created through the use of a 490- by 33- by 20-foot 3-D printer that fabricates the basic components required for assembly.

More after the jump.

Mo Beach Mo Benches: Norwegian Firm Crafts Waterfront Plan Along Fjord Coastline

Mo i rana3

(Courtesy Arkitektgruppen Cubus AS)

Norwegian firm Arkitektgruppen Cubus AS has conjured up a subtle design intervention for a small stretch of Norway’s fjord coastline. Located in Mo i Rana, a town North of the studio’s Bergen headquarters, the plan reshapes portions of the waterfront through the placement of modular seating, shelters, and walkways. The components of the scheme are to be realized in steel and concrete that has long been-manufactured in the area.

Mo after the jump.

Chicago Issues Demolition Permit for Cuneo Memorial Hospital

Development, Midwest, News, Preservation
Thursday, January 23, 2014
.
cuneo memorial hospital, a 1957 Edo Belli building, is slated for demolition. (devin hunter via flickr)

cuneo memorial hospital, a 1957 Edo Belli building, is slated for demolition. (devin hunter via flickr)

Chicago officials issued a demolition permit for Cuneo Memorial Hospital this week, dealing a blow to neighborhood activists and preservationists who have been fighting to save the curvy Uptown structure. Cuneo had made Preservation Chicago’s list of seven most endangered buildings in 2012.

Continue reading after the jump.

Forty Years Later, San Diego Gets Its New Central Library

West
Monday, November 25, 2013
.
SAN DIEGO'S NEW CENTRAL LIBRARY OPENED SEPTEMBER 28 (ROB WELLINGTON QUIGLEY, FAIA)

SAN DIEGO’S NEW CENTRAL LIBRARY OPENED SEPTEMBER 28 (ROB WELLINGTON QUIGLEY, FAIA)

San Diego’s New Central Library, which opened earlier this fall, was a long time coming. The project has been in the works since at least 1971, when the first of 46 studies on the subject of a new library building was published. Rob Wellington Quigley, FAIA, who designed the $184.9 million structure with Tucker Sadler & Associates, came on board in 1995. Why did he stick with it so long, through budget problems and four site changes? “It’s in my backyard,” Quigley said. “It was just too important a project, culturally, to the city, and to all of us…though it was very difficult, economically, to withstand all the stops and starts.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Los Angeles Earthquake Report: Be Afraid

West
Wednesday, October 23, 2013
.
Hospital in Sylmar destroyed by the San Fernando Earthquake.  (US Geological Survey)

Hospital in Sylmar destroyed by the San Fernando Earthquake. (US Geological Survey)

If you live or work in one of LA’s many older concrete buildings and happened to read the  Los Angeles Times recent story, “Concrete Risks,” your building, as swanky and detailed as it may be, may never be experienced in quite the same light. The report sounds the alarm on over 1,000 concrete buildings in the city and throughout the region that “may be at risk of collapsing in a major earthquake.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Crooked Columns Raising Eyebrows at The New School

East
Tuesday, October 2, 2012
.
South West View (Courtesy afinecompany.blogspot.com)

Southwest View (Courtesy afinecompany.blogspot.com)

If you walk down Fifth Avenue and 14th Street toward Union Square and notice a building under construction with crooked columns, don’t worry—it is not about to collapse. According to NBC New York, the SOM-designed New School University Center, previously detailed by AN, is raising eyebrows from the local community because some of its columns are slightly skewed.

But it’s no mistake. “It’s the most efficient way to carry all of the different structural loads of the building from the top of the foundation, ” Joel Towers, Parsons The New School for Design dean told NBC. The New York City Department of Buildings has confirmed there are no safety issues with the project.

 

Fluid Walls Show Off Concrete’s Seductive Side

Fabrikator
Friday, September 21, 2012
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator
Selvika

National Tourist Route Rv 889 Havøysund in northern Norway by Reiulf Ramstad Architects

Two new projects prove that concrete’s rigidity is no longer set in stone

From Peter Eisenman’s Berlin Holocaust Memorial to Paul Rudolph’s Art and Architecture building, concrete has been used with finesse in minimalist and brutalist structures and, as such, is mostly thought of as cold or aggressive. Two recent projects in Portugal and Norway are set to change our hard-edged opinion of concrete and show that it can be as fluid as a ribbon waving in the wind. Casa Xieira II, a private home in Leiria, Portugal, designed by A2 + Arquitectos, and the National Tourist Route Rv 889 Havøysund in northern Norway by Reiulf Ramstad Architects both feature winding concrete wrappers that stand out in sharp contrast to their surroundings, a factor that only becomes more important when your primary building material is as stark as concrete. Read More

Filed Under: ,

Quick Clicks> Barbie’s Abode, Faked Results, Transit Geography, and Hangar One

Daily Clicks
Wednesday, August 10, 2011
.

The new Barbie House (Courtesy AIA)

Bachelorette Pad. This fall, Barbie is finally becoming an architect—and getting a new house—built with the latest sustainable materials. Mattel teamed up with AIA to host a competition to design Barbie’s new home and Ting Li and Maja Parklar’s design for the Malibu Beach House took the top prize. Their design features a green roof, solar panels, bamboo flooring, and low VOC paints. More at Inhabitat.

Cheating on the Test. In a major blow for public safety, the New York Post reported that American Standard Testing and Consulting Labs—the company responsible for testing the safety and strength of concrete in projects like LaGuardia Airport, the Lincoln Tunnel, and Yankee Stadium—faked concrete test results. DOB inspectors have begun conducting spot checks and the buildings were found safe.

Transit Geography. Using Google Maps, Mapnificent illustrates how far public transportation users can go in a specified amount. While only available in major global cities, the maps allow users to calculate transportation times at two intersecting areas, highlighting possible travel distances. Now we can figure out exactly how far public transportation takes us in a New York minute.

Hanging in There. Nasa’s Hangar One at Moffet Field in San Francisco—built in 1933 for the USS Macon Navy airship—was once the largest freestanding structure in the world, but funding to renovate the massive facility have fallen through according to Gizmodo. NASA is in the process of pursuing alternative reuse options for the historic modern landmark.

Filed Under: , , , , ,

Concrete Verdict Set in Stone

East
Thursday, February 18, 2010
.

Cracked concrete at Yankee Stadium. (New York Times)

The citywide concrete crackdown continued yesterday as jurors delivered a guilty verdict against Testwell Laboratories and its owner, V. Reddy Kancharla, who were accused of falsifying concrete test reports for a range of high-profile projects including Yankee Stadium and the Freedom Tower. The question of whether Kancharla and his company committed the more serious charge of enterprise corruption, which carries a possible prison sentence of 25 years, is still being examined by the jury, according to the Times. Read More

Page 1 of 212

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License