wHY Architecture to Convert Masonic Temple Into a New Art Museum in Los Angeles

West
Thursday, August 15, 2013
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Millard Sheets' Masonic Temple. (Courtesy Google)

Millard Sheets’ Masonic Temple. (Courtesy Google)

Culver City firm wHY Architecture has been selected to design a new art museum in Los Angeles for Maurice and Paul Marciano, the founders of clothing empire Guess? Inc. The museum will be located inside a marble-clad, four story Scottish Rite Masonic Temple on Wilshire Boulevard near Lucerne Boulevard.

When retrofitted in 2015, the austere building, originally designed by legendary artist Millard Sheets, will contain 90,000 square feet of exhibition space, showing off the Marciano’s impressive collection, which will be open for “periodic exhibitions for the public.”

wHY has also designed L&M Arts and Perry Rubenstein Gallery in LA, an expansion of the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, and the Tyler Museum of Art in Texas. They’re also working on a Studio Art Hall at Pomona College outside of LA.

Peace of Infinity in California

Fabrikator
Friday, August 9, 2013
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator

 
Concreteworks fabricated 122 8-inch components for an architectural screen in a California residence. (Mariko Reed)

Concreteworks fabricated 122 8-inch components for an architectural screen in a Sonoma, Calif., residence. (Mariko Reed)

Concreteworks fabricates a Hauer-inspired concrete screen for a residential West Coast architect.

Oakland, California–based design and fabrication studio Concreteworks has crafted custom concrete products—bath fixtures, commercial and residential surfacing, outdoor furniture—for more than 20 years. In the last three years, the company has branched out into “lab projects,” in which the 30-member workshop models and mills concrete into three-dimensional architectural features. It does so without the aid of specifications from the designer. “We solve the design issue and the technical requirements,” creative director Mark Rogero told AN.

Interior architect Michelle Wempe of Zumaooh discovered Concreteworks’ advanced capabilities in the company’s showroom and was impressed enough to incorporate the work in a residential project she was working on in Sonoma. Though her original design did not include it, Wempe asked Rogero to develop a custom patterned architectural screen at the terminus of a hallway between a living area and private quarters. “We got a lot of inspiration from Erwin Hauer’s work, and the client contributed some images of a 2D cross that is a symbol of peace in some parts of the world,” Rogero said.

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Welton Becket’s Santa Monica Civic Auditorium Says Goodbye

West
Tuesday, July 2, 2013
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(Courtesy Santa Monica Civic Auditorium)

(Courtesy Santa Monica Civic Auditorium)

Welton Becket’s 1958 Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, once a beacon of midcentury optimism, this weekend shuttered its doors. The bending, intricately ornamented auditorium hosted several Academy Awards in the 1960s, as well as concerts by the likes of Eric Clapton, Frank Sinatra, James Brown, Ella Fitzgerald, Prince, and Bob Dylan.

But the facility recently fell on hard times, as bands gravitated to larger venues (leaving it mostly hosting trade fairs), and as a planned $52 million renovation was recently cancelled when California abolished its Community Redevelopment Agencies.

Santa Monica Civic, a working group strategizing the venue’s future, told the LA Times that it will take several months to develop a new plan for the landmarked structure, including film screenings, live theater, or even restaurants.

Arquitectonica Adds a Pair of Towers to San Francisco’s Growing Rincon Hill Neighborhood

West
Friday, June 28, 2013
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LUMINA - 201 Folsom Street in San Francisco. (Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

LUMINA – 201 Folsom Street in San Francisco. (Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

In 2005, San Francisco officials rezoned Rincon Hill, a neighborhood close to the Financial District, to allow for high-density housing. Since then, residential developments have popped up, including The Infinity, One Rincon Hill, and the under construction 45 Lansing Street, in an area that was once a maritime and industrial hub.

The newest, Tishman Speyer and China Vanke’s LUMINA, at 201 Folsom Street, broke ground this Wednesday. The Arquitectonica-designed development will add 655 condos to the Rincon Hill neighborhood, with views of the city and bay. The residence—two towers (the tallest at 42 stories) and two mid-rise buildings arranged along a courtyard—will have luxury amenities like floor-to-celing windows, a full service sky terrace, and a three-story clubhouse with a pool. Expected completion for the project is spring 2015.

Q+A> Is Los Angeles’ Arts District As Hot As We Think?

Newsletter, West
Thursday, April 11, 2013
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Shimoda Design's rendering of Alameda Square (Shimoda Design)

Shimoda Design’s rendering of Alameda Square (Shimoda Design Group)

Last week, AN reported on the development of Alameda Square in Los Angeles, the 1.5-million-square-foot mixed use project being designed at the old American Apparel factory site on the southwest edge of LA’s Arts District. Movement on projects like this beg the question: Just how hot is LA’s Arts District? AN‘s West Coast Editor Sam Lubell sat down for a short chat with James Sattler, a Vice President of Acquisitions at JP Morgan Asset Management, to find out.

Read the interview after the jump.

Giant Solar Array at Occidental College Wows Los Angeles

West
Wednesday, April 10, 2013
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Oxy Solar Array (Sam Lubell/ AN)

Oxy Solar Array. (Sam Lubell/ AN)

At a DeLab (Design East of La Brea) Tour this Saturday, Los Angeles-based firm Lettuce Office shared the epic story of its new solar array for LA’s Occidental College. The 1 megawatt installation, made up of 4,886-panels, follows the contours of its hilly site, with its angled panels raised just two or three feet off the ground. To guard against sliding, each set of panels had to be imbedded into the earth via concrete-supported columns.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pelli Clarke Pelli’s Transbay Center Glass Facade Could Become Perforated Metal

West
Thursday, March 21, 2013
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transbay_facade_01btransbay_facade_01a

 

The perforated aluminum skin would replace the previously proposed glass facade. (Courtesy TJPA)

It looks like Pelli Clarke Pelli’s Transbay Transit Center, which stretches about three blocks through the city’s Rincon Hill neighborhood, might go ahead with its first major piece of value engineering. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the architects have suggested that the building’s undulating glass skin become perforated aluminum. The move would meet federal safety guidelines and chop $17 million from the estimated $1.59 billion budget for the center’s first phase. The Transbay Joint Powers Authority (TJPA) board will be  asked to approve the change at its March 25 meeting. The structure is not expected to be complete before 2017.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architect’s Plan Would Add A Bike and Pedestrian Tube to San Diego’s Coronado Bay Bridge

West
Wednesday, March 6, 2013
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Rendering of the proposed bike and pedestrian tube on the Coronado Bay Bridge. (Courtesy Domus Studio)

Rendering of the proposed bike and pedestrian tube on the Coronado Bay Bridge. (Courtesy Domus Studio)

From the top of San Diego’s soaring 200-foot-tall Coronado Bay Bridge, architect Lew Dominy says you can see Mexico, but outside of special events when the bridge is closed to automobile traffic, pedestrians and bicyclists who might stop to admire the view are prohibited. Dominy, principal at San Diego-based domusstudio architecture, has a plan to build a tube through the distinctive archways of the Coronado’s support piers that would bring multi-modal access to the bridge.

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Frank Gehry Unveils Mixed-Use Tower For Santa Monica

Newsletter, West
Friday, March 1, 2013
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Frank Gehry's 22-story tower for Santa Monica. (Courtesy Gehry Partners)

Frank Gehry’s 22-story tower for Santa Monica. (Courtesy Gehry Partners)

OMA and Robert A.M. Stern are not the only starchitects zeroing in on Santa Monica. Frank Gehry is designing a 22-story, 244-foot-tall tower on a 1.9 acre site on the corner of Ocean Avenue and Santa Monica Boulevard.  Plans for the project were submitted to the city yesterday, according to the  Santa Monica Planning Department. The tower, located just a block from the beach and around the corner from the 3rd Street Promenade, would house a 125-room hotel, 22 condos, and two stories of retail and restaurants.  A 36,000-square-foot art museum, incorporating two landmarked structures, would also be built just north of the tower.

Read More

Carpooling with Corporations: Exactly Who Is in the Passenger Seat?

West
Tuesday, January 8, 2013
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(Justin Cozart / Flickr)

(Justin Cozart / Flickr)

Carpool lanes typically are meant to reduce congestion, not make political statements, but one Bay Area HOV lane finds itself at the center of a national controversy. NBC News reported that Jonathan Frieman has been trying to get pulled over for more than a decade, and now that he’s been slapped with a $481 minimum fine for driving alone, he’s hoping to challenge his case in court.

The twist? Frieman claims he did have another person riding with him, brandishing his incorporation papers. According to California vehicle law and long-established U.S. federal law, corporations legally represent a person. More recently, in 2010, the Supreme Court issued its contested Citizens United decision, stating that corporate funding of political campaigns is protected under the First Amendment. Frieman, who opposes the concept, hopes to take the case to court in an attempt to overturn corporate personhood.

NBBJ Designing Samsung’s New Silicon Valley Campus

Newsletter, West
Monday, January 7, 2013
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New courtyard at Samsung's new San Jose Campus. (Courtesy NBBJ)

New courtyard at Samsung’s new San Jose Campus. (Courtesy NBBJ)

As Apple and Facebook have proven, corporate complexes are all the rage these days in Silicon Valley. Samsung (Apple’s phone nemesis) is the latest tech titan to add to the roster of architectural Bay Area campuses, rivaling Apple’s planned circular headquarters and Facebook’s Gehry-designed West Campus. The company plans to build a 1.1 million square foot sales and R&D headquarters on its current North San Jose site. Designed NBBJ, it will include a 10-story tower, an amenity pavilion, and a parking garage.

Continue reading after the jump.

Impressive Shortlist at New UC Davis Art Museum

West
Thursday, December 6, 2012
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Henning Larsen designed the National Museum of Norway. Will they design UC-Davis' new art museum? (Courtesy Henning Larsen)

Henning Larsen designed the National Museum of Norway. Will they design UC-Davis’ new art museum? (Courtesy Henning Larsen)

Three design-build teams have been shortlisted to design the $30 million Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art at the University of California, Davis. They are: WORKac and Westlake Reed Leskosky with Kitchell; Henning Larsen Architects and Gould Evans with Oliver and Co; and SO–IL and Bohlin Cywinski Jackson with Whiting-Turner. Each team had four months to prepare a bid for the museum. The museum will be named after Jan Shrem, operator of Clos Pegase winery in the Napa Valley, and his wife Maria Manetti Shrem.

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