Ball-Nogues Rethinks the Corner with a Silvery Halo in West Hollywood

Art, Design, Newsletter, West
Tuesday, June 10, 2014
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Corner Glory (Ball-Nogues)

Corner Glory at The Dylan.  (Ball-Nogues)

A prominent corner in West Hollywood now wears an architectural halo. Tasked with designing a permanent installation for The Dylan, a new apartment building at Santa Monica Boulevard and La Brea Avenue, Ball-Nogues Studio decided to create “something that would serve as a kind of gateway to West Hollywood,” according to Benjamin Ball. “Because we were going to work on this corner, we didn’t have very much real estate. We decided to think about the corner as though it was emanating a kind of supernatural force, something suggestive of some kind of metaphysical presence emanating from this banal corner of the building. Sort of like a glory that surrounds a relic’s figure in religious iconography, without the religious icon.”

COntinue reading after the jump.

Flight Delays: “Lack of Sophistication” Delays Public Art LAX’s New Tom Bradley Terminal

Eavesdroplet, West
Friday, September 13, 2013
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Inside Fentress Architects' Tom Bradley terminal at LAX. (Jason A. Knowles)

Inside Fentress Architects’ Tom Bradley terminal at LAX. (Jason A. Knowles)

LAX finally opened its shiny new Tom Bradley terminal, designed by Fentress Architects, to quite a hullabaloo in July. The throngs who showed up for “Appreciation Days” got to enjoy shopping, music, and even free LAX keychains and knickknacks. But one of the most prominent elements was missing: the public art. Major pieces by Ball-Nogues, Pae White, and Mark Bradford were all delayed for what one participant called “a lack of sophistication on LAX’s part” in shepherding such work through. In other words, the officials didn’t get how to pull this kind of thing off. Well never fear, despite the bumps, contract disputes, and many miscues, the installations will begin opening in late September and continue through the end of the year. Better late than never.

Inside Ball-Nogues Studio’s Canadian Vault

Fabrikator
Friday, August 2, 2013
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Ball-Nogues Studio engineered 930 reflective stainless steel spheres for a site-specific installation in Edmonton, Alberta. (Benjamin Ball)

Ball-Nogues Studio manipulated 930 reflective stainless steel spheres for a site-specific installation in Edmonton, Alberta. (Benjamin Ball)

In 2011, a major expansion to Edmonton, Alberta’s Quesnell Bridge generated an ongoing effort to enliven the landscape surrounding the overpass, which connects the northwest and southwest portions of Canada’s fifth largest city. A resultant public art commission from the Edmonton Arts Council for Los Angeles–based multidisciplinary design-build fabricators Ball-Nogues Studio called for an engaging installation along the south side of the North Saskatchewan River, which sees a live load of 120,000 vehicles each day.

While brainstorming the project, it was apparent to the firm’s principal and designer in charge Benjamin Ball that the areas immediately surrounding the bridge were not carefully considered by passengers. “It was a sort of no-man’s-land between the transportation infrastructure and the landscape,” he recently told AN. Drawing inspiration from the mundane—sand piles, gravel, and detritus from the trucking industry—and the majestic—talus and scree formations enveloping the base of surrounding cliffs—Ball and the studio’s cofounder Nogues applied their knowledge of sphere packing to echo the angle of repose of natural and man-made mounds. Read More

Ball-Nogues Hangs San Francisco’s Transamerica Pyramid From the Nevada Art Museum’s Ceiling

West
Friday, July 19, 2013
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(Daniel Berlin)

A portion of the giant hanging installation. (Daniel Berlin)

Things didn’t work out for installation experts Ball-Nogues Studio at MOCA’s New Sculpturalism show, but the firm has rebounded nicely. They’ve  just completed mounting one of their most ambitious works yet: a 70-foot-tall upside-down replica of William Pereira’s Transamerica Pyramid, for the show Modernist Maverick: The Architecture of William Pereira, on view at the Nevada Art Museum in Reno, NV. The installation, made out of chain link and stainless steel plates, hangs from the ceiling via steel cables attached to the museum building’s structure.

“We distilled it to its barest essentials. It looks like the ghost of the building,” said Ball-Nogues principal Gaston Nogues.  Each chain could only be attached at a specific point, so the hardest part was fine tuning the model, stretching and moving each possible iteration, added Nogues. “It’s quite labor intensive to make sure it looked flat, and that each chain had the right tension,” he said. The show, which opens next week, runs from through October 13. It  looks at many other noted Pereira projects, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the University of California, San Diego Geisel Library, and the Theme Building at LAX.

 

On View> Ball-Nogues Studio: Yevrus 1, Negative Impression

West
Friday, June 1, 2012
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(Courtesy SCI-Arc Gallery)

(Courtesy SCI-Arc Gallery)

Ball-Nogues Studio: Yevrus 1, Negative Impression
SCI-Arc Gallery
960 East 3rd Street
Los Angeles, CA
June 1–July 8

On display at the SCI-Arc Gallery is Los Angeles–based architecture practice Ball-Nogues Studio’s Yevrus 1, Negative Impression, which attempts to call into question the current fashionability of abstracted and digital forms. Through an assemblage of non-architectural objects represented very literally, the project represents a new type of site survey. The objects selected to be part of the structure were picked from the Los Angeles suburban landscape (a pool, above) and become the elements of an installation. The architects used digital scanning technology to make biodegradable paper-pulp castings of 1973 Volkswagen Beetles and speedboats for a lookout tower in the gallery. Yevrus (“survey” spelled backwards) is a new technique pioneered by the firm that rethinks the site survey by utilizing it not as a tool for construction and engineering, but as a methodology of deriving form, creating structures, and realizing meaning.

More images after the jump.

New Boldface Names from the Architectural League of New York

National
Friday, January 14, 2011
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LentSpace in New York by Interboro Partners (photo: Michael Falco/The New York Times)

The Architectural League of New York’s Emerging Voices program is one of the country’s most prestigious venues for showcasing significant design talent. This years list is no exception, with a mix of young and more established firms, working in a variety of scales and formal and social approaches. The lecture series will begin on Wednesday, March 9 with Brooklyn’s Interboro Partners and Lateral Office of Toronto.  Read More

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