Urbana’s Shape-Shifting Parking Garage Facade

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Urbana Studio designed an interactive aluminum facade for an existing parking structure at Eskenazi Hospital in Indianapolis. (Serge Hoeltschi)

Urbana Studio designed an interactive aluminum facade for an existing parking structure at Eskenazi Hospital in Indianapolis. (Serge Hoeltschi)

Folded aluminum panels deliver the illusion of movement to passersby.

During their recent expansion, Eskenazi Hospital in Indianapolis approached Urbana Studio with an unusual request. The hospital wanted the Los Angeles-based art and architecture firm to design an interactive facade for a recently completed parking structure. “With Indianapolis’ really extreme weather patterns, we gave a lot of thought to: how can we make something that’s interactive but won’t be broken in a year?” said Urbana principal Rob Ley. “Unfortunately, the history of kinetic facades teaches us that that they can become a maintenance nightmare.” Urbana’s solution was to turn the relationship between movement and the object on its head. Though the aluminum facade, titled May September, is itself static, it appears to morph and change color as the viewer walks or drives by.
Read More

Alexander Gorlin Wraps Supportive Housing in a Binary Skin

Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
Located in the Bronx, The Brook provides housing and support services for the formerly homeless and individuals living with HIV/AIDS. (Courtesy Alexander Gorlin Architects)

Located in the Bronx, The Brook provides housing and support services for the formerly homeless and individuals living with HIV/AIDS. (Courtesy Alexander Gorlin Architects)

An aluminum rain screen and locally-sourced brick articulate a two-part program.

The Brook, developed by Common Ground and designed by Alexander Gorlin Architects, is part of a new wave of affordable housing communities popping up all over the United States. Unlike the public housing projects of the mid-twentieth century, which focused exclusively on housing and tended to suffer from a lack of routine maintenance, The Brook, located in the Bronx, combines apartments and support services under one roof. This duality is manifested in the envelope’s contrasting material palette—dark grey brick for the residential spaces, raw aluminum over the community facilities. “The idea of the exterior was to symbolize, as well as reflect, the internal program of Common Ground as supportive housing,” said Alexander Gorlin. “It’s inspired in part by Le Corbusier and his idea of expressing the program on the facade, and expressing the public functions as a means of interrupting a repetitive facade.” Read More

Rutgers Campus Cornerstone by TEN Arquitectos

Architecture, East, Envelope
Wednesday, June 25, 2014
.
Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
Folded anodized aluminum panels enclose the sides of the building that face away from campus. (Peter Aaron/ESTO)

Folded anodized aluminum panels enclose the sides of the building that face away from campus. (Peter Aaron/ESTO)

Parallel facade systems in contrasting materials mark the edge of development on a reimagined campus.

The new Rutgers Business School in Piscataway, New Jersey, is more than a collection of classrooms and offices. The building, designed by TEN Arquitectos, is a linchpin of the university’s Livingston campus, reconceived as an urban center for graduate studies and continuing education. “It established a frame,” said project manager James Carse, whose firm created a vision plan for the campus starting in the late 2000s. “We were interested in really marking the edge of campus to motivate future development to respect the campus boundary, rather than allowing or suggesting that this was a pervasive sprawl. We wanted to make sure this would set a pattern where infill would happen.” The Rutgers Business School’s tripartite envelope reinforces the distinction between outside and inside. While the sides of the building facing the boundary line are enclosed in folded anodized aluminum panels, the glass curtain walls opposite create a visual dialogue with the rest of campus. Read More

Aluminum Organic by J. MAYER H. Architects

Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
J. MAYER H. Architects designed a sculptural facade of anodized aluminum for an apartment building in Berlin. (Ludger Paffrath for Euroboden)

J. MAYER H. Architects designed a sculptural facade of anodized aluminum for an apartment building in Berlin. (Ludger Paffrath for Euroboden)

Ribbons of laser-cut metal lamellas envelop a glass curtain wall.

J. MAYER H. Architects designed the sculptural anodized aluminum facade of JOH3, a Berlin apartment building located near both the Friedrichstrasße and Museum Island, as a contemporary echo of its historic neighbors. “The project is located in an old part of Berlin, where there are lots of facades with stucco detail,” said project architect Hans Schneider. “We tried to do something as rich with a new design, something like Jugendstil [the German Art Deco movement] but in a modern translation.”
Read More

Product> Hardware for Doors, Drawers, and More

Interiors, Product
Tuesday, May 6, 2014
.
GKD_PhelpsDunbar2

FUTURA 3110 BY GKD. (COURTESY GKD METAL FABRICS)

Whether concealed or out in the open, hinges, handles, and railings enhance both the safety and aesthetics of the well-considered interior. Here’s a selective survey of hardware culled from the AN files.

GKD Metal Fabrics
Futura 3110

This stainless steel metal mesh is ideal for interior and exterior applications, such as balustrades, screens, and space dividers. Woven for flexibility in one direction, the product weighs just less than 2 pounds-per-square-foot and is 0.37 inches thick. Its 65 percent open area makes it ideal for sun shading applications.

Continue reading after the jump.

Zaha Hadid’s Boldly Curvaceous Forms and Surfaces from Milan

International, Product
Monday, April 28, 2014
.
Zaha Hadid's Manta Ray bench. (Jacopo Spilimbergo)

Zaha Hadid’s Manta Ray bench. (Jacopo Spilimbergo)

While much of the work introduced at Milan this year played it safe—distinctly conservative colors, forms familiar from the 1950s, cautious use of materials—some architects’ designs took, shall we say, a bolder stance. But: Was it a better one? You, ever-opinionated reader, shall and no doubt will be the judge of that. Among the boldest of the bold designs this year were four pieces presented by Zaha Hadid.

Read More

Origami Architecture: Make’s Portable Pop-Up Kiosks Fold Metal Like Paper

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Make Architects' kiosks fold open and shut. (Courtesy Make Architects)

Make Architects’ kiosks fold open and shut. (Courtesy Make Architects)

Inspired by Japanese paper-folding, Canary Wharf booths make a sculptural statement whether open or shut.

Make Architects’ folding kiosks for Canary Wharf in London bring new meaning to the term “pop-up shop.” The bellows-like structures were inspired by Japanese paper folding. “[The kiosk] had to be solid, but lightweight, so then that led us to origami,” said Make lead project architect Sean Affleck. “[You] end up with something very flimsy; add a few folds and creases, and suddenly the strength appears. In the folds, the shape appears.”

Continue reading after the jump.

ZGF Builds a Suit of Armor for The University of Oregon

Envelope, West
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
.
Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
THE HATFIELD-DOWLIN COMPLEX SUGGESTS A COMBINATION OF GROUNDEDNESS AND AMBITION (JEREMY BITTERMANN)

THE HATFIELD-DOWLIN COMPLEX SUGGESTS A COMBINATION OF GROUNDEDNESS AND AMBITION (JEREMY BITTERMANN)

The glass, stone, and metal exterior of the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex evokes the strength and agility of a college athlete.

The superhero and the Samurai. That’s where Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects (ZGF) began their design of the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex at the University of Oregon. The football player, the architects imagined, is like Batman: stealthy and strong, he came to his powers not by supernatural accident, but through relentless training. At the same time, the athlete is a highly skilled warrior, the modern-day equivalent of Japanese military nobility. The facade of the new football training facility materializes these ideas in glass, stone, and metal. Dominated by horizontal expanses of tinted glass, it is powerful but not foreboding. ZGF offers the analogy to a suit of armor: the building’s skin balances protection and connection, solidity and agility.

Read More

Situ Fabrication Cracks Google’s Code

Fabrikator
Friday, September 20, 2013
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator

 
Situ Fabrication crafted 27 12-foot-panels for the lobby of Google's New York City office. (courtesy Situ Fabrication)

Situ Fabrication crafted 27 12-foot-tall triangulated panels for the lobby of Google’s New York City office. (courtesy Situ Fabrication)

HLW’s binary design for Google’s New York office supports the company’s product offerings.

Google is renowned in design circles for its unique offices around the globe, and the main lobby of the Internet search giant’s New York City office is no exception. Architecture firm HLW took its inspiration for the design of the space from Google’s Code of Conduct. The architects rendered the document’s stipulations in binary code, and applied those perforations on a series of 27, 12-foot-tall triangulated aluminum wall panels. This digital-age design feature is a nod to Google’s domain as well as to the process by which the panels themselves were created.

Brooklyn-based Situ Fabrication, the newly established fabrication arm of Situ Studio, worked with HLW to achieve a monolithic appearance across each of the 27 panels. Since the design called for “folded-looking planes,” Situ Fabrication opted to work with 1/8-inch-thick aluminum composite material (ACM) for ease of manipulation and the clean edges that the material would produce when processed on wood working machines. To reinforce the ACM sheets, Situ designed and fabricated a triangulated frame from welded aluminum tubing, resulting in a 2-inch-thick panel section. Read More

The Cartesian Collection: A 17th Century Design Reboot

Fabrikator
Friday, June 28, 2013
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator
The Cartesian Collection by Alexander Purcell Rodrigues was fabricated from 1/2-inch thick aluminum by the Neal Feay Company. (courtesy Alexander Purcell Rodrigues)

The Cartesian Collection by Alexander Purcell Rodrigues was fabricated from 1/2-inch thick aluminum by the Neal Feay Company. (courtesy Alexander Purcell Rodrigues)

An ambitious designer used Rhino to design and fabricate 20 variations on a chair in four months.

For a designer aiming to streamline the gap between design and manufacturing, parametric modeling tools are a natural solution. LA-based Alexander Purcell Rodrigues found a place to work in just such a way at the Neal Feay Company (NF), a 60-year old fabrication studio in Santa Barbara, California, that is known for its exceptional metalworking. Together, the designer and the fabrication studio created the Cartesian Collection of chairs, aptly named for the analytic geometry that helped facilitate close to 20 design variations on the same aluminum frame in just under four months. “Not only were we pushing the boundaries of aluminum fabrication, the aim was to simultaneously create a lean manufacturing process,” said Rodrigues.

Using Rhino with a Grasshopper plugin, Rodrigues developed a design for a chair that weaves together the simplicity of Western design with the complex ornamentation of traditional Eastern aesthetics. While the lines of the chair are clean and smooth, intricate embellishments on the back traverse multiple planes and angles, all on a shrunken scale. The time savings involved in designing with Rhino allowed the creation of another 19 variations on the theme. Read More

Manhattan Street Map by FLATCUT_ Ties Together Experiments In Motion

Fabrikator
Friday, December 14, 2012
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator
The model of Manhattan's street grid floats above visitors, offering a new perspective on the city. (Collin Erickson)

The model of Manhattan’s street grid floats above visitors, offering a new perspective on the city. (Collin Erickson)

Audi and GSAPP teamed with FLATCUT_ to create a 1:1500 scale model of Manhattan’s street grid from 3/16-inch-thick aluminum sheets

This September at the preview of the Lowline Park in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, visitors had the opportunity to absorb nine visions by students from Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) about the future of urban living and mobility. Conducted as the culmination of a yearlong research program in partnership with Audi of America, the exhibition, Experiments in Motion, was tied together and contextualized by a hanging, 50-foot-long, 1:1500 scale model of Manhattan’s street grid. Audi and GSAPP called on New York and New Jersey-based fabrication studio FLATCUT_ to create the model, which also calls out every subway station on the island. The job required the studio to pull off a high wire balancing act: the fabrication of an object both intricate and sturdy, modular yet monolithic. Read More

nonLin/Lin Pavilion: Marc Fornes/THEVERYMANY

Fabrikator
Friday, August 19, 2011
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

The nonLin/Lin Pavilion at the FRAC Centre in Orleans, France (THEVERYMANY)

An aluminum prototype structure at FRAC explores non-linear design and fabrication

The new nonLin/Lin Pavilion at the FRAC Centre in Orleans, France, is a coral-like structure of 40 pre-assembled white aluminum modules made of 570 CNC-cut single components punched with 155,780 asterisk-shaped CNC-drilled holes and held together by 75,000 white aluminum rivets. But these pieces, as designer Marc Fornes of THEVERYMANY has demonstrated throughout his work, are much more than the sum of their parts. Neither an art installation nor a model, the pavilion is full-scale architecture that pushes the limits of its materials and of physical fabrication processes with custom computational protocols.

Read More

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License