Another City is Possible: Alternatives to the Smart City

1.5 AIA and New York State CEUs

This lecture is presented by The Architectural League’s IDEAS CITY.

The idea of the “smart city” enjoys considerable intellectual currency at the moment, in the popular media as well as conversations in architecture, urban planning, and local government. In this talk, Adam Greenfield will argue that these discourses offer a potentially authoritarian vision of cities under centralized, computational surveillance and control: overplanned, overdetermined, driven by the needs of enterprise. What might some more fruitful alternatives look like? How can we design urban technology that responds to our needs, demands, and desires? Above all, how might we inscribe a robust conception of the right to the city in the technological systems that will do so much to define the urban experience in the twenty-first century?

Adam Greenfield is a New York City-based writer and urbanist. This talk will present material from his new pamphlet “Against the smart city” (available for purchase here), the first part of his forthcoming book The City Is Here For You To Use, which will explore the intersection of emerging networked information technologies with urban place. He is also the author of Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing; “Urban Computing and Its Discontents,” a pamphlet co-authored with Mark Shepard for The Architectural League’s Situated Technologies series; as well as two features on the League’s Urban Omnibus, “A Diagram of Occupy Sandy” and “Frameworks for Citizen Responsiveness: Towards a Read/Write Urbanism.”

Lecture

Event Details:


  • When: 

    Wednesday, November 6, 2013
    7:00 pm

  • Where: 

    New Museum Theater
    235 Bowery
    New York, NY

  • More information: 

    Event website.

Submit your event to The Architect's Newspaper!
 
Read The Architect's Newspaper!

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License