A Set Design That Moves

West
Wednesday, April 6, 2011
.

Michael Montgomery and Keelan Whitmore featured in one of Christopher Haas' original sets. Photo by RJ Muna

Every architect has a mental file of unusual client requests, but few, if any, have been asked to make a wall dance. Yet, in essence, that’s what San Francisco architect Christopher Haas created—not for a client, but for a collaborator, Alonzo King, the San-Francisco-based choreographer. For King’s LINES Ballet company’s spring season that premieres April 15-24 at the city’s Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Haas created a wall that performs,  but not as a soloist. Read More

Silver Lake′s Grassy Nirvana Finally Opens

West
Tuesday, April 5, 2011
.

After years of waiting, as of this past weekend Silver Lake residents can finally enjoy the “Meadow,” a 6-acre swath of grassy land adjacent to the Silver Lake Reservoir and west of Silver Lake Boulevard that’s been fought over and delayed for several years. It was determined that the Meadow could  be opened to the public because the Reservoir itself will soon be replaced as a drinking water source by underground storage tanks north of Griffith Park (plus restless neighbors fearing outsider encroachment and the destruction of local habitats finally relented). We finally had a spare second to check it out today, and were very impressed.

Read More

Bestor Unleashes Disco Silencio at SCI-Arc

Dean's List, Newsletter, West
Monday, April 4, 2011
.

Architectural exhibition openings are hardly known for their cool vibe, but that’s apparently because they’re not usually put on by LA-based Barbara Bestor Architecture. On April 1 SCI-Arc opened Bestor’s Disco Silencio to a crowd very eager to party. The installation at the SCI-Arc gallery is a demi-dodecahedron formed in plywood meant to be a silent retreat for frazzled SCI-Arc architecture students (at least when the DJ isn’t spinning and disco lights are whirling).

Continue reading after the jump.

Filed Under: ,

Stanford Hospital Plans to Be Surprisingly Hospitable

West
Friday, April 1, 2011
.
The new hospital will be the tall man on the Stanford campus. Courtesy Rafael Viñoly Architects.

The new hospital will be the tall man on the Stanford campus. Courtesy Rafael Viñoly Architects.

One of the biggest projects on the San Francisco Peninsula is the upcoming $720 million Stanford Hospital.  It will replace — though not displace — the hospital’s current home, a three-story affair designed by Edward Durell Stone in 1959, which has a concrete brise-soleil and is very much a building of its time. The new structure, which Rafael Viñoly Architects is in charge of, looks more like a hotel than a hospital, and the design is an indication of what state-of-the-art healthcare facilities are emphasizing these days. Designed to maximize natural lighting in what is often a rather closed, oppressive environment, the Viñoly hospital features a checkerboard layout, in which buildings are interspersed with squares of open space.

Read more after the jump.

LA Conservancy Votes To Preserve Community Redevelopment Agencies

West
Wednesday, March 30, 2011
.

The renovation of the Hollywood Palladium was made possible by a CRA/LA grant. ©Coe Architects

As California’s redevelopment agencies face possible extinction, one notable group has thrown its hat into the ring. The LA Conservancy has announced that it will give its annual President’s Award to the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles (CRA/LA) for “Its commitment to reusing historic structures—and promoting historic preservation” in its redevelopment plans. “We thought it was a timely way to recognize what they’ve been doing and their role in trying to foster strategic investments across the city,” said Adrian Scott Fine, the Conservancy’s Director of Advocacy, who pointed to the agency’s help with, financing, surveys, and in some cases purchase of historic buildings to  attract investment in historic conservation.

Read more after the jump.

Searching For A New Sign In Silver Lake

West
Monday, March 28, 2011
.

©Darren Kim

Long a haven for architects, artists, and other creative types, Silver Lake needs no introduction. It’s enough to drive by the iconic Sunset Junction sign to know you’re in the heart of LA’s bohemian world (although hipsters in Echo Park might argue). Come 2012, that sign might be getting some serious competition.

Early this month, LA City Council President Eric Garcetti, the Silver Lake Neighborhood Council, and Silver Lake community groups announced the launch of “Envisioning Silver Lake,” a design competition meant to squeeze some neighborly love from the hearts and brains of local creatives.  The call covers concept designs for a plaza and a permanent installation on Sunset Junction, at the intersection of Sunset and Santa Monica Boulevards.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gensler Wins Hypothetical LA Stadium Commission

West
Friday, March 25, 2011
.

Gensler's proposed design for a Downtown LA Stadium.

Although LA still does not have an NFL Team, developer AEG today awarded architecture giant Gensler the design of the city’s hypothetical 1.7 million square foot downtown stadium, called Farmers Field. Gensler beat out HKS and HNTB who were also shortlisted for the project back in December. If the $1 billion project moves forward it will seat 65,000 to 75,000 people, contain about 200 luxury suites, and have a retractable roof, enabling it to facilitate convention events as well as football games. Gensler’s  proposal also features a lightweight ETFE roof, bulging outward and taking on an oval-shaped profile. Read More

Filed Under: , , ,

Visionary Update in Inglewood

Newsletter, West
Friday, March 25, 2011
.

Last fall we reported on (fer) Studio’s proposed designs for Inglewood’s once-bustling but now down-on-its-luck Market Street; a strategy to anchor the street, enliven its storefronts, and integrate it with the coming Expo Light Rail line. Those preliminary designs have come a long way. Their latest iteration again focuses on Market Street’s re-zoning, but fleshes out a wider system of  urban agriculture; wind, photovoltaic, bio fuel, and geothermal energy; a green belt, and a self-contained water reservoir. Not to mention some gigantic planted towers, canopies, and  walls—”vertical public spaces giving Inglewood an identity,” says (fer)’s Chris Mercier, over transit and mixed-use. Despite losing their staunchest ally, Mayor Daniel Tabor (who recently resigned) they’ve submitted the plans to Cascadia’s Living City Competition, and are still trying to push them to what is a fairly conservative city council.  To get a closer look at these and other visionary plans from (fer), join our friends at deLAB as they visit their studios in Inglewood tomorrow. More pix of (fer)’s schemes below. Read More

Greatest (Public Art) Of All Time in LA?

West
Thursday, March 24, 2011
.

Image © Sam Lubell

Our friends at Oyler Wu are putting the finishing touches on their collaboration with artist Michael Kalish that brings a pixelated face of Muhammad Ali to L.A. Live’s plaza in Downtown Los Angeles. The sculpture, reALIze, which has its official unveiling tomorrow night, consists of a large frame of hundreds of aluminum tubes on which 1,300 speed bags are hung via steel cables. From most angles it looks like a bit of a jumble, but from straight on, the composition of light and dark bags indeed forms an impressive likeness of the champ.

Check out more photos after the jump.

Slideshow> Ellis Island West

West
Thursday, March 24, 2011
.

When anyone thinks of U.S. immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries they picture Ellis Island. But the West Coast’s counterpart was the US Immigration Station at Angel Island, a 1910 collection of modest timber buildings located off the coast of Tiburon, just outside San Francisco.

Until the end of World War II thousands of immigrants arrived here; most from the far east. And while Ellis Island was no picnic, this was an even harder place. Technically a detention center, its crowded barracks held hundreds of people for up to a year at a time. Thanks to California State Parks’ recent $20 million renovation by SF-based Architectural Resources Group and Tom Eliot Fisch, you can now visit.

Check out the slideshow after the jump.

Back To School Thanks To AIA LA

Dean's List, West
Wednesday, March 23, 2011
.

In response to the lack of, ahem, any money in architecture these days, AIA/LA has announced a new scholarship to help members pay for the chapter’s ARE (Architect Registration Exam) seminars. The Saturday seminars usually cost $85 each for members, so if someone wants to take all ten, that’s worth $850. Preference goes to unemployed or under-employed architects, and right now there’s no limit to how many will be handed out. The chapter is about to award its first six scholarships today, says Matt Krinsky, AIA/LA’s Director of Programs and Events. By the way, for those struggling young architects hoping to get inspiration, check out the winners of the AIA’s Arch Is competition — Freeland Buck and Marcelo Spina— at LA’s A+D Museum tonight.

Event> Tobias Wong at SFMOMA

West
Wednesday, March 23, 2011
.
Tobias Wong

Gold-plated objects of daily life and a brooch made of Kevlar by Tobias Wong.

  • Tobias Wong
  • SFMOMA
  • 151 3rd St.
  • San Francisco
  • Through June 19

Tobias Wong, the so-called “bad boy” of design, has his first solo show at SFMOMA. The honor comes posthumously, as Wong died in 2010 at the age of 35. Henry Urbach, SFMOMA’s Helen Hilton Raiser Curator of Architecture and Design, developed the exhibit, which features over 30 works by the late artist/designer.

Wong’s designs, which he commonly referred to as “postinteresting” and “paraconceptual,” often played with the subversion of today’s consumer culture and the obsession with wealth and the toys that often accompany it, as well as post-9/11 American anxiety and its material manifestations.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 54 of 77« First...102030...5253545556...6070...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License