On View> Chinese American Architects in Los Angeles, 1945-1980

West
Monday, April 2, 2012
.
Choy Residence. (Julius Schulman)

Choy Residence. (Julius Schulman)

Breaking Ground: Chinese American Architects in Los Angeles (1945–1980)
The Chinese American Museum
425 North Los Angeles St., Los Angeles
Through June 3

As part of the Pacific Standard Time initiative, the Chinese American Museum presents Breaking Ground to showcase the pioneering contributions made by four Southern California–based Chinese American architects. These architects, Eugene K. Choy, Gilbert Leong, Helen Liu Fong, and Gin Wong, all made contributions to the development of postwar California architecture, from Choy and Leong’s playful Chinatown Modernism to Wong’s radical masterplan for LAX and Fong’s development of the Googie style (think neon signage and cantilevered boomerang-shaped roofs). Original and reproduced photographs, blueprints, renderings, and drawings of works by the architects are on display, including original photographs by architectural photographer Julius Shulman (above, The Choy House).

More images after the jump.

Unbelievabubble! Inflatable Mania Overcomes USC Students

Dean's List, West
Friday, March 30, 2012
.
Students check out one of the three installations.

Students examine "Sheer Pressure" from inside and out. (Pouya Goshayeshi)

In the interest of getting students to build physical things, three years ago, USC introduced Top Fuel, a week-long design-build workshop accompanied by lectures, exhibitions, and panels. This year’s workshop, “Filters Funnels Flows,” wrapped up earlier this week. It focused on pneumatic (aka inflatable) structures, teaching students about the “inseparable relation between form and performance of pneumatic systems.” Indeed, produce the wrong form here (or material, or structure) and the piece doesn’t inflate. Students also explored lighting, temperature, and other environmental issues.

Continue reading after the jump.

Filed Under: , , ,

Disco Inferno At UCLA Creates Amorphous Oddities

Dean's List, West
Friday, March 30, 2012
.

(Gustavo Martinez)

In a city obsessed with spectacle, it seems only fitting that graduate architecture students at UCLA would investigate the subject in one of its most literal forms. The students (including the author of this blog post) have designed objects, known collectively as Space Oddities, or Variations on the Disco Ball, for a 10-week technology and construction seminar led by professor Jasson Payne. The pieces, morphed from their disco ball origins, are now neither spherical nor symmetrical. Hung in a darkened gallery, they cast a dizzying array of reflections, shapes, shadows, and forms across the room.

Continue reading after the jump.

Hollywood Freeway Park Gains Allies in High Places

West
Thursday, March 29, 2012
.

LA’s proposed 44-acre Hollywood Central Park, which would be set atop the capped 101 Freeway between Santa Monica and Hollywood boulevards, made new friends in Washington last week, according to the LA Daily News. U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood met with local congressman Adam Schiff and Friends of the Hollywood Central Park (FHCP), a non-profit formed in 2008 to raise funds for the park. LaHood expressed interest in the project, and provided insights on its development and possible benefits. He also offered to have members of his staff contribute to its planning process.

Continue reading after the jump.

Addressing Water Scarcity at A+D

West
Wednesday, March 28, 2012
.
Tom Kosbau's winning vision for the Drylands Design Competition uses the LA River as a fertile agrarian center.

Tom Kosbau's winning vision for the Drylands Design Competition uses the LA River as a fertile agrarian center.

Last Thursday, we visited the opening of the A+D Museum’s new show, Drylands Design. While politicians squabble about oil and other resources, the show drives home the point that water is the reserve that will become the most fraught in the future as populations increase and climate change worsens. The Arid Lands Institute at Woodbury University culled the exhibit from the winners of their Drylands Design Competition, which encouraged architects, engineers, and urban designers to respond to the challenges of coming water scarcity.

Continue reading after the jump.

Jeff Koons Proposes Bringing Trains Back to the High Line

East, West
Tuesday, March 27, 2012
.

Courtesy Friends of the High Line

When preliminary designs for the third and final section of the High Line were revealed, the designers presented several options including flowerbeds and amphitheater seating for the Tenth Avenue Spur, an offshoot of the park that stands above the intersection of 10th Avenue and 30th Street. The design team’s aim is to make the Spur one of the main gathering spaces in the park. Now, with the proposal of a massive installation by artist Jeff Koons calling for a suspended locomotive over the park, the Spur may become exhibition space as well.

Continue reading after the jump.

Google Fires Ingenhoven from Mountain View Headquarters Project

Eavesdroplet, Newsletter, West
Tuesday, March 27, 2012
.

An early conception of the campus created by the city of Mountain View.

You can’t even, well, Google it yet, but we’ve picked some meaty news from the grapevine: Google has fired German firm Ingenhoven Architects as the designers of its new headquarters in Mountain View, California. The building, to be located on 18.6 acres next to the current “Googleplex,” off of North Shoreline Boulevard, would measure a maximum of 595,000 square feet and house 2,500 to 3,000 employees, including executives, engineers, and scientists.

Continue reading after the jump.

Filed Under: , ,

America’s Cup Carousel Keeps Turning

West
Monday, March 26, 2012
.
Piers 27-29 would be the focus of the scaled down event, although piers 30-32 may still be in play. (Courtesy America's Cup)

Piers 27-29 would be the focus of the scaled down event, although piers 30-32 may still be in play. (Courtesy America's Cup)

The real estate roulette wheel known as the San Francisco America’s Cup is still in spin.  In the latest turn of events, the city has kicked in a modest $8 million or so to complete partial repairs to Piers 30-32, which had previously been removed from the deal by the privately-run America’s Cup Event Authority (ACEA). Then, citing difficulties in securing corporate sponsors, the Authority named a new CEO and cut its staff in half.

Continue reading after the jump.

Manufacturing in the Future Happens on the Construction Site

Newsletter, West
Thursday, March 22, 2012
.

In our recent story about architectural manufacturing in Southern California we alluded to LA-based curtain wall specialists Enclos‘ dream of manufacturing on-site through semi trailers that contain mini-factories inside. The assembly line trailers, known as “Cassette Wall Assembly Mobile Facilities,” would pull into the site and open up via hinges, rollers or adjustable panels. They could solve the problem of shipping glass curtain wall pieces long distances by putting all production onsite. “Auto-assemble robotic technology,” along with conveyer belts, suction cups (to move the glass), silicone pumps (for glazing), and of course human elbow grease could produce units quickly, accurately and, in many cases, in custom fashion. Here’s a video of that process. Welcome to the future, people.

Urban Intervention Finalists Imagine Seattle Center 2.0

West
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
.

"Seattle Jelly Bean" by team PRAUD.

How can technology and science revolutionize and restore our public spaces—particularly those disconnected and decaying districts that remain after colossal events such as the Olympics, biennials, and world’s fairs? These immense programs have shaped many an urban core, for better or for worse, from the Chicago World’s Fair of 1893 to the 2004 Athens Olympics.

As part of the Seattle Next Fifty, the 50th anniversary of the Seattle 1962 World’s Fair Century 21 Exposition, the Howard S. Wright Design Ideas Competition for Public Space challenged global designers, architects, and urban planners to re-imagine the 9 acre Seattle Center site that was part of the larger 74-acre campus, which hosted the original 1962 fair.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Architecture in the Expanded Field

West
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
.
(Courtesy CCA Wattis Institute)

(Courtesy CCA Wattis Institute)

Architecture in the Expanded Field
CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts
1111 8th St., San Francisco
Through April 7

Theorist and critic Rosalind Krauss’s 1979 text “Sculpture in the Expanded Field” attempts to identify the scope of sculpture in a time when artists were redefining its traditional limits to include considerations of architecture, landscape, and space. The Wattis attempts a similar redefinition of the field of architecture; installations explore material, spatial, and perceptual concerns with emerging experimental technologies outside the limits of traditional architectural practice. A full-scale installation within and outside of the gallery transports visitors into the immersive environment, while a surface component presents the mapped expanded field of architectural installation.

Ped Plaza Hit-and-Run.  Silver Lake's soiled pedestrian plaza. (Sarah Dryden) Well that didn’t take long. Less than a month after opening it’s first pedestrian plaza carved out of underused road space in Silver Lake, a hit-and-run driver in Los Angeles careened into massive planters meant to protect the plaza just before 5 a.m., spewing dirt across Rios Clementi Hale’s polka dotted plaza. Resident Sarah Dryden (whose car was also smashed up) snapped a photo of the mess. No one was hurt, but the city is now looking for more robust bollard options to keep the plaza safe from motorists. (Via Curbed LA.)

 

Page 35 of 71« First...102030...3334353637...405060...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License