Pelli Clarke Pelli’s Transbay Center Glass Facade Could Become Perforated Metal

West
Thursday, March 21, 2013
.
transbay_facade_01btransbay_facade_01a

 

The perforated aluminum skin would replace the previously proposed glass facade. (Courtesy TJPA)

It looks like Pelli Clarke Pelli’s Transbay Transit Center, which stretches about three blocks through the city’s Rincon Hill neighborhood, might go ahead with its first major piece of value engineering. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the architects have suggested that the building’s undulating glass skin become perforated aluminum. The move would meet federal safety guidelines and chop $17 million from the estimated $1.59 billion budget for the center’s first phase. The Transbay Joint Powers Authority (TJPA) board will be  asked to approve the change at its March 25 meeting. The structure is not expected to be complete before 2017.

Continue reading after the jump.

Leading West Coast Architects Celebrate DnA’s Relaunch in Santa Monica

West
Thursday, March 21, 2013
.
Eventgoers outside the Tesla Store in Santa Monica. (Micah Cordy)

Eventgoers outside the Tesla Store in Santa Monica. (Micah Cordy)

On Monday, members of LA’s design and architecture cognoscenti descended on the Tesla store on Santa Monica’s Third Street Promenade to celebrate the official relaunch of KCRW’s DnA (Design and Architecture). The event featured a discussion between DnA host and executive producer Frances Anderton and Elon Musk, the visionary founder-CEO of Tesla and Space X. Those present included Michael Rotondi, Ray Kappe, Thom Mayne, developer Tom Gilmore, and Getty architecture curators Wim de Wit and Christopher Alexander.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Travis Somerville: A Great Cloud of Witnesses

West
Wednesday, March 20, 2013
.
(Travis Somerville)

(Travis Somerville)

Travis Somerville: A Great Cloud of Witnesses
Catherine Clark Gallery
150 Minna Street, San Francisco
Through April 13

In his solo exhibition at Catherine Clark Gallery, Travis Somerville presents a mixed-media exhibition, layering past and present. He continues his work investigating historical memory and questioning how particular fragmented stories are simplified into collective truths. Specifically, Somerville uses imagery from the Civil Rights movement to explore the status of human rights in our contemporary society. By presenting current stories of immigration, Uzbekistan’s child labor, and the uprisings of the Arab Spring against collages, images, and objects from the Civil Rights movement, Somerville explores our “post racial” culture. One installation presents a line of reproduced racially designated water fountains mounted to a gallery wall.

Dissecting Natural Design at the LA Natural History Museum

West
Monday, March 18, 2013
.
(Sam Lubell/ AN)

Staggered rocks contain plant life that sprout from their many in between spaces. (Sam Lubell / AN)

On Saturday I moderated one of two AIA/LA-sponsored panels about bio-inspired design at the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum. The first panel looked at the general influence of nature on design, from the Mars Rover to the San Diego Zoo, and ours zeroed in on architecture’s envelopes and skins, with insights about breaking away from the static, heavy, and largely-unresponsive architecture of today by architect Tom Wiscombe, Arup engineer Russell Fortmeyer, and evolutionary biologist Shauna Price. Speaking of bio-inspired design, before the panel I got an early look at the new gardens at the Natural History Museum, designed by Mia Lehrer + Associates.

Continue reading after the jump.

Top of the Glass: Students Design Shimmering Pavilion At USC

Dean's List, Newsletter, West
Friday, March 15, 2013
.
(Roland Wahlroos-Ritter)

(Roland Wahlroos-Ritter)

Once again the courtyards at the USC School of Architecture are bubbling with installations as part of the second-year 2b studio, in which several teams of undergraduate students design and build structures in a very short period of time. Perhaps the most striking is the shimmering pavilion created by the 14-student class of professor Roland Wahlroos-Ritter. The studio focused  on glass’ structural, reflective, and refractive qualities.

Continue reading after the jump.

BIG’s Bergmann To Teach Studio on Freeway Impacts.  BIG's Bergmann To Teach Studio on Freeway Impacts Fourteen architecture students will be thinking BIG this spring as the NewSchool of Architecture and Design (NSAD) in San Diego teams up with Bjarke Ingels Group to offer a design studio led by Kai-Uwe Bergmann (pictured), partner and director of business development at the world-conquering firm. Starting in April, students will explore the impact of freeways along key sections of the coast, with San Diego acting as an urban laboratory. They’ll also be asked to propose uses to make freeways like the I-5 more community-friendly. Working directly with Bergmann, the budding architects will also get an immersion in the firm’s “Yes is More” and “Hedonistic Sustainability” philosophies. “When we explored themes with BIG for this NSAD studio, from the start their interest was in something that would have an impact, such as dealing with large urban systems, patterns or infrastructure,” Kurt Hunker, NSAD director of graduate programs said in a statement.

 

Wait, What? Now MOCA Might Team Up With National Gallery

West
Wednesday, March 13, 2013
.
Inside the East Wing Atrium at the National Gallery of Art in DC. (cleita / Flickr)

Inside the East Wing Atrium at the National Gallery of Art in DC. (cleita / Flickr)

Now we’re really confused. Amidst reports that LA’s MOCA might be taken over by LACMA or USC, now we hear via the New York Times that the struggling institution might now join forces with the National Gallery in Washington D.C. According to John Wilmerding, the chairman of the Gallery’s board of trustees, MOCA is “close to working out a five-year agreement…to collaborate on programming, research and exhibitions.” The deal wouldn’t include fundraising assistance, but would obviously bolster MOCA’s ability to raise money with the National Gallery’s high profile assistance on programming, exhibitions, research, curation, and staffing. Oh, and guess who approached the National Gallery, according to the story: MOCA board chair Eli Broad, who has made it clear he doesn’t want to be swallowed by LACMA. Stay tuned as this saga plays out.

Downtown LA Update: Streetcar Moving, Tower Trading, Stadium Stalling?

West
Tuesday, March 12, 2013
.
Rumors are swirling about the fate of Gensler's Downtown LA Stadium. But thus far we're still in the dark. (Courtesy Gensler)

Rumors are swirling about the fate of Gensler’s Downtown LA Stadium. But thus far we’re still in the dark. (Courtesy Gensler)

In recent weeks we’ve seen a number of important developments in Downtown Los Angeles, like the groundbreaking of the Arquitectonica-designed apartments on Grand Avenue, and the topping out of The Broad next door. The red-hot area continues to make headlines, from the advancement of its upcoming streetcar to the murkiness of its proposed football stadium.

The latest Downtown LA developments after the jump.

Doug Aitken to Wrap The Seattle Art Museum With LED Video Art Screen

Newsletter, West
Monday, March 11, 2013
.

Seattle is about to get a new public art installation on the walls of SAM, the Seattle Art Museum. The museum that created the nearby Olympic Sculpture Park—one of the best public art spaces in the country—has commissioned artist Doug Aitken to install a new reflective wall on the corner of their building at First Avenue and Union Street. Aitken calls the wall installation Mirror and it is meant to “reflect the energy and movement of the city.”

Continue reading after the jump.

SCI-Arc Alums To Celebrate SCI-Arc Alums With New Installation

West
Thursday, March 7, 2013
.
Farmers and Merchants Bank, site of the 40/40 installation. (Michael Smith / Flickr)

Farmers and Merchants Bank, site of the 40/40 installation. (Michael Smith / Flickr)

SCI-Arc is hosting a competition—called 40/40—open to all graduates for the design and construction of an installation capable of digitally presenting the work of the school’s alumni. The installation will celebrate the school’s upcoming 40th anniversary. To tie into the April 11 Downtown Art Walk, the exhibition will first be installed—or rather the winner of the competition has to figure out how it will be installed—in the lobby space of the monumental downtown Farmers and Merchants Bank. It will subsequently move to SCI-Arc for the 40th Anniversary Celebration Weekend of April 19-21, 2013.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architect’s Plan Would Add A Bike and Pedestrian Tube to San Diego’s Coronado Bay Bridge

West
Wednesday, March 6, 2013
.
Rendering of the proposed bike and pedestrian tube on the Coronado Bay Bridge. (Courtesy Domus Studio)

Rendering of the proposed bike and pedestrian tube on the Coronado Bay Bridge. (Courtesy Domus Studio)

From the top of San Diego’s soaring 200-foot-tall Coronado Bay Bridge, architect Lew Dominy says you can see Mexico, but outside of special events when the bridge is closed to automobile traffic, pedestrians and bicyclists who might stop to admire the view are prohibited. Dominy, principal at San Diego-based domusstudio architecture, has a plan to build a tube through the distinctive archways of the Coronado’s support piers that would bring multi-modal access to the bridge.

Read More

Tonight> Watch Leo Villareal’s “Bay Lights” in San Francisco (or Online!)

West
Tuesday, March 5, 2013
.
Rendering of the Bay Lights installation. (Courtesy Bay Lights)

Rendering of the Bay Lights installation. (Courtesy Bay Lights)

Lighting artist Leo Villareal has been busy lately, opening installations in the New York City subway system and in Madison Square Park, but an even bigger achievement is set to debut tonight in San Francisco. Villareal has attached 25,000 LED lights to the San Francisco Bay Bridge and connected them to a computer in order to create dazzling lighting displays viewable from the city and the water along the suspension bridge.

Called The Bay Lights, the project celebrates the bridge’s 75th anniversary and is set to go live tonight at 8:30 PST. But don’t worry, if you’re not in San Francisco to view the installation from the Embarcadero or Telegraph Hill, the event will be streamed live online at the project’s website here. Until then, check out a couple videos below of the installation being tested. The Bay Lights is believed to be the largest of its type in the world and will be in San Francisco for two years, lit each night from dusk till 2:00a.m.

Watch a couple videos after the jump.

Page 28 of 81« First...1020...2627282930...405060...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License