We Built It: Moby Riffs On LA Architecture for Pacific Standard Time Presents

West
Friday, February 8, 2013
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It’s obvious that Moby, whose L.A. architecture blog has become quite the sensation, has now become the official mainstream spokesperson for the city’s design community. First he made the big address starting off the AIA/LA awards in Santa Monica. Now he put together a video (above) to accompany his address for the kickoff of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. Some of Moby’s many statements about LA architecture: “baffling,” byzantine,” “mind-numbingly complicated,” “fantastically uncohesive,” and, a little better, “LA has the most diverse, interesting architecture of any city on the planet.” Now we can only guess where he’ll pop up next. Meanwhile he becomes the latest in a line of celebs the Getty has tapped to promote its offerings, from Ice Cube to Anthony Kiedis. Move over Starchitects. Here come architecture stars.

Los Angeles’ New Parklets Bring Color, Fun To the Street

West
Friday, February 8, 2013
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Enjoying LA's newest Parklet. (Sam Lubell / AN)

Enjoying LA’s newest Parklet. (Sam Lubell / AN)

Earlier this week, AN reported on the opening of Los Angeles’s first parklet in Eagle Rock. Thursday saw the arrival of the city’s second and third sidewalk-extending mini-parks, located on Spring Street in Downtown LA’s historic core. Created by architects/developers utopiad.org, designers Berry and Linné, and builders Hensel Phelps, the 40 foot by 60 foot parklets, located just a few parallel parking spots from each other, are impressively detailed and fitted, with wood planter boxes, minimalist bench seating, stone pavers, hardwood decking, and quirky touches like seat swings, astro turf, bar seats, colorful fences, foosball tables, and exercise bikes.

Continue reading after the jump.

San Francisco’s Shipping Container Village Grows Up, Adds High-Style Retailer

West
Thursday, February 7, 2013
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Aether's jutting glass mezzanine. (Peter Prato)

Aether’s jutting glass mezzanine. (Peter Prato)

There’s a new couture addition to PROXY, the temporary shipping container village in San Francisco’s Hayes Valley, designed by architects Envelope A+D.  Adding to PROXY’s cool coffee shop, ice cream parlor, and Biergarten is a new store for clothing company Aether, made up of three forty foot shipping containers stacked atop one another, supported by steel columns.  The guts of the first two containers have been carved out, making a double story retail space, with a glass mezzanine above jutting to the side, providing display space and views. A third container for inventory storage is accessible via a custom-designed drycleaners’ conveyor belt spanning all three floors. Workers can literally load garments from the ground floor and send them up to the top.

Continue reading after the jump.

SCI-Arc’s “Hispanic Steps” Ready For Lectures & Performances

Dean's List, Eavesdroplet, West
Wednesday, February 6, 2013
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(Courtesy Artplace)

SCI-Arc’s Hispanic Steps. (Courtesy Artplace)

Our favorite new naming triumph: SCI-Arc’s “Hispanic Steps.” The new indoor amphitheater, paid for in part by a recent ArtPlace grant and located in the middle of the SCI-Arc building in Los Angeles, is used for lectures, performances, symposia, film series, and community meetings. At a recent meeting to discuss SCI-Arc’s Arts District plans that are also part of the $400,000 ArtPlace grant, officials posed on the newly completed steps for a photo. Included are SCI-Arc’s Chief Advancement Officer, Sarah Sullivan (front center) and Chief Operating Officer, Jamie Bennett (upper right).

Grand Avenue Gets Another Extension, But May Lose Gehry?

West
Monday, February 4, 2013
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Gehry's towers and ebullient retail may be on their way out (Gehry Partners)

Gehry’s towers and ebullient retail may be on their way out. (Gehry Partners)

Los Angeles supervisor Gloria Molina has confirmed what we suspected all along. The Grand Avenue committee—chaired by Molina—has granted the Related Companies a third extension on its lease to develop The Grand, a multi-billion dollar, mixed-use development on top of the city’s Bunker Hill. The project’s Civic Park, designed by Rios Clementi Hale Studios, opened last summer, and the first built project, an apartment by Arquitectonica, broke ground earlier this month. But the rest of the project, including 9 acres encompassing at least 2,100 residential units, a hotel, shopping, and dining, still remains dormant. Related would not commit to its original designer, Frank Gehry, when AN talked with them last year, nor would they confirm his continued involvement in a recent interview with the LA Downtown News. More images of Gehry’s perhaps-defunct plan below.

Read More

San Francisco Mayor Pledges Improved Transit

West
Thursday, January 31, 2013
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Inside T-Central's Chinatown station (SFMTA)

Inside T-Central’s Chinatown station (SFMTA)

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee has seen some success in his time in office. But one element still remains a thorn in his side: MUNI, the city’s transit agency. In his State of the City address the other day (watch full speech below) Lee vowed to improve the notoriously late and overcrowded system, reported the San Francisco Chronicle. ”We need to modernize our system…to better match up with 21st century patterns of where people live, work, and shop,” said Lee.

A few remedies that Lee has suggested: the formation of a task force to help develop a plan for modernizing the system and dealing with the city’s growing population; expansion of BART, the Bay Area’s regional transit system; new work rule reforms; and a bevy of new technologies. ”Truly great cities have great transportation systems—Paris, New York, London, Tokyo,” Lee said. “I say San Francisco is pretty great, too, and deserves one as well.” The city is in fact adding a new transit line, the downtown T-Central, to help alleviate congestion problems. It’s slated to open in 2019. Check out images of the city’s upcoming line below.

Watch the State of the City address after the jump.

EVENT> Exploring The Connection Between Paris and Los Angeles

West
Tuesday, January 29, 2013
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Inside the Schindler House, site of the first "Dialogue". (www.visitwesthollywood.com)

Inside the Schindler House, site of the first “Dialogue.” (www.visitwesthollywood.com)

Starting Wednesday, January 30, LA’s MAK Center and arts promoter ForYourArt will begin hosting Dialogues: Art/Architecture, Paris/Los Angeles, a series of events bringing together architects and artists from those two cities. Events include four discussions at the Schindler House in West Hollywood, an exhibition of drawings and models at ForYourArt in Miracle Mile, and the launch of a  publication compiling participants’ work and discussion.

More details after the jump.

Stretch of LA River To Become Recreational Zone This Summer

West
Monday, January 28, 2013
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river-master-plan

(Mia Lehrer + Associates)

Those of you who live in Los Angeles may know that much of the LA River is already tacitly open to activity like biking and jogging. But it’s all been very unofficial—until now. Last week, AN attended a meeting about an upcoming program to open a 4.6 mile portion of the Los Angeles River known as the Glendale Narrows—stretching from Griffith Park to Elysian Park—to public recreational use this summer. “Recreational use” includes walking, hiking, fishing, birdwatching, and yes, even boating (portions of the river have been open to guided kayak tours, but not to general boating)—but, alas, no tubing.

COntinue reading after the jump.

New Peeks at SOM’S LA Federal Courthouse

West
Friday, January 25, 2013
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Plaza and entryway (SOM)

Plaza and entryway (SOM)

We’ve known for some time that SOM will be designing the new US Courthouse in Downtown Los Angeles. We’ve even gotten some glimpses of their scheme. But the firm has just unveiled new images of the project, filling out the picture of this new landmark for the city on the corner of 1st Street and Broadway.

The familiar image of a cube-like, 550,000-square-foot structure in the middle of the city is now accompanied by a closer view of a folded glass façade imbedded with a United States seal. The building, which floats above a central core, appears to cantilever outward on all sides, with ramps and a small park leading the way to the entry.  Inside we get a peek at a large central atrium rising several stories, and walls made of some kind of blond stone. Exposed central stairs appear to make climbing upward a public process. SOM is still unable to comment on their scheme, but we’ll let you know when that changes.

More renderings after the jump.

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Cable-Stayed Replacement For Desmond Bridge Unveiled In Long Beach

West
Thursday, January 24, 2013
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Existing Desmond Bridge (Port of Long Beach)

Existing Desmond Bridge. (Port of Long Beach)

If you have ever seen the film To Live and Die in L.A. then you know the Gerald Desmond Bridge. It has a starring role in the opening sequence, when Treasury agent Richard Chance (played by William Peterson) bungee jumps off of it. You probably haven’t bungeed off it yourself, but If you’ve ever driven across it, you might get why it needs replacing. The original bridge, according to the project website, “is nearing the end of its intended lifespan.” In fact, the old bridge, while considered safe, is a little scary. Netting has been suspended beneath it to catch pieces of falling concrete. Additionally, its approaches are too steep, it’s too narrow, and perhaps most importantly, the newest container ships can’t fit under it.

Continue reading after the jump.

Synthesis Wins Shanghai Competition With “Urban Canyon” Concept

International, West
Tuesday, January 22, 2013
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04Ne perspetive

Street perspective of development. (SDA)

Los Angeles-based Synthesis Design & Architecture (SDA) in association with Shenzhen General Institute of Architectural Design and Research have won an invited competition to design the 1.9 million-square-foot, mixed-use Shanghai Wuzhou International Plaza in Shanghai.

Their slick “Urban Canyon” concept summons images of a magnificent gorge cutting through the city with its two nested cliff-like structures that have been carved from the landscape by staggered, pebble-looking buildings. The facades’ and roofs’ grooved titanium-zinc cladding adds to the metaphor while mimicking the energy and vibrancy of the city.

Divided into two blocks, the northern area houses luxury retail shops and developer Hong Kong Wuzhou International Group’s corporate offices. The southern section is a retail, lifestyle and entertainment complex anchored by two office towers. Sky bridges connect the buildings and outside, plazas, landscaping, seating areas, and dynamic lighting are integrated. Practical details are still being finalized.

More renderings after the jump.

Dome, Sweet Dome: Artist Knits a Hat For Rem Koolhaas

Eavesdroplet, West
Monday, January 21, 2013
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Rem Koolhaas, the Koolhaas Hat, and the Seattle Public Library. (Montage by AN)

Rem Koolhaas, the Koolhaas Hat, and the Seattle Public Library. (Montage by AN)

We’ve always known that Rem Koolhaas has a special relationship with textiles and those who make them. But watch out Petra Blaisse, someone else may be hoping to knit his way into Rem’s heart. According to the blog Knitting Daily, artist Jared Flood has created the wool “Koolhaas Hat,” a toboggan whose diamond-shaped pattern is inspired by the facade of OMA’s Seattle Public Library. We hope Flood will send a sample directly to Rotterdam. Watching a recent video of Rem accepting the annual Charles Jencks Award at RIBA in London, the formidable noggin looked particularly windswept.

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