Arquitectonica Adds a Pair of Towers to San Francisco’s Growing Rincon Hill Neighborhood

West
Friday, June 28, 2013
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LUMINA - 201 Folsom Street in San Francisco. (Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

LUMINA – 201 Folsom Street in San Francisco. (Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

In 2005, San Francisco officials rezoned Rincon Hill, a neighborhood close to the Financial District, to allow for high-density housing. Since then, residential developments have popped up, including The Infinity, One Rincon Hill, and the under construction 45 Lansing Street, in an area that was once a maritime and industrial hub.

The newest, Tishman Speyer and China Vanke’s LUMINA, at 201 Folsom Street, broke ground this Wednesday. The Arquitectonica-designed development will add 655 condos to the Rincon Hill neighborhood, with views of the city and bay. The residence—two towers (the tallest at 42 stories) and two mid-rise buildings arranged along a courtyard—will have luxury amenities like floor-to-celing windows, a full service sky terrace, and a three-story clubhouse with a pool. Expected completion for the project is spring 2015.

Behind LAX’s LED Explosion: Moment Factory Brings Drama Back to the Airport

West
Thursday, June 27, 2013
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The other day, AN revealed details of Fentress Architects’ new Tom Bradley International Terminal at LAX, with its arched, light-infused spaces and fancy new retail offerings. Variety takes a closer look at LA- and Montreal-based  media company Moment Factory’s contribution: a series of interactive displays, including an 80-foot LED “Welcome Wall” that greets visitors, two “Concourse Portals” consisting of 10 video columns that respond to movement, and the 72-foot “Time Tower,” a four-sided LED experience surrounding the terminal’s main elevator. The system, which can be updated and adapted, is the most sophisticated of any in the country. And the production, as you can see from the video above, rivaled that of many motion pictures.

In other airport news, we plan to head over to Long Beach to see the renovation of several of its airport concourses, part of a $140 modernization plan. We’ll keep you posted.

San Francisco Academy of Sciences Adding Pavilion to Piano-Designed Campus

West
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
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Conceptual rendering of the new dining pavilion (Mark Cavagnero Associates)

Conceptual rendering of the new dining pavilion (Mark Cavagnero Associates)

The San Francisco Academy of Sciences has okayed a small new dining pavilion designed by Mark Cavagnero, to sit adjacent to its Renzo Piano-design museum, reports the San Francisco Chronicle‘s John King. The 12-foot-tall, 1,450 square foot space will be located in a corner of the museum’s west garden, replacing an unused aviary.

The project is still in conceptual stages, but so far it looks as though it would be rectilinear, lightweight, and glassy, with a large cantilevered flat roof providing shade. Museum guests can bring food out to the pavilion, or just use the space for relaxation. The rather minimal construction should make a good counterpoint to Piano’s dynamic, undulating one. “When cultural facilities hire star architects to attract attention and set a new tone, the follow-through is as important as the first-year buzz,” pointed out King.

Conservation Case Study on the Eames House

West
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Eames House Conservation Project (Kyle Normandin, GCI)

Eames House Conservation Project (Kyle Normandin, GCI)

Charles and Ray Eames designed their Pacific Palisades home in 1949 as part of the Case Study Program, which was begun by John Entenza, editor of Arts & Architecture Magazine. The program invited some of the best architects of the day to share their ideas for using new materials and methods to construct well-designed, mass-producible housing. The two-part, rectangular house was constructed of prefabricated materials and off-the-shelf products. Now, the  Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) has made the mid-20th century modern architecture landmark a subject of its Conserving Modern Architecture Initiative.

Continue reading after the jump.

Winning “Cellular Complexity” Installation Design Twists the Limits of Architecture

Newsletter, West
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Rendering and model of Cellular Complexity. (Courtesy Julia Koerner, Marie Boltenstern, and Kais Al-Rawi)

Rendering and model of Cellular Complexity. (Courtesy Julia Koerner, Marie Boltenstern, and Kais Al-Rawi)

AIA Los Angeles has announced that UCLA SUPRASTUDIO lecturer Julia Koerner’s proposal Cellular Complexity is the winning entry for the 11th annual 2×8 Student Exhibition, a scholarship organization that has showcased projects of over 150 students from more than 15 architecture and design schools in California. This year’s winning scheme, in collaboration with Paris-based architect Marie Boltenstern and architect Kais Al-Rawi, presents a parametric pavilion of twisting planes that transitions in porosity from one end to the other. According to the AIA|LA, the jury appreciated the design concept’s creativity and edginess. The installation and exhibition of student work is expected to be complete by February 2014.

More images after the jump.

LAX is Really Getting There: Fentress Opens Major Terminal Expansion

West
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Inside the Tom Bradley Terminal's new Great Hall (Sam Lubell/ AN)

Inside the Tom Bradley Terminal’s new Great Hall (Sam Lubell/ AN)

Don’t look now, but LAX—the airport everyone loves to hate—is starting to complete its major makeover. The biggest change is the brand new $1.9 billion (yes, billion) addition to the Tom Bradley International Terminal, designed by Fentress Architects and unveiled in 2008. Its curving roofline, emulating waves breaking on the nearby beach, pops up behind the original Tom Bradley structure, which itself was recently renovated (for the cost of $723 million) by Leo A Daly.

Continue reading after the jump.

(Very) Bike Friendly Streets.  (Very) Bike Friendly Streets It’s summer time! And you know what that means, bikes! Many (very) enthusiastic cyclists followed up National Bike Month by (very) carefully covering their bike seats and stripping down for the World Naked Bike Ride! (NSFW) Yes, on June 8 cyclists all around the country rode completely or partially naked through the streets of their respective metropolises. In San Francisco they braved a recent ban on public nudity. In Los Angeles they cruised through the hipster zones of Silver Lake and Echo Park, and in Portland they even had a naked marching band to cheer them on. If that’s not an argument for bike friendly streets, we don’t know what is.

 

San Francisco Facades+ Performance: Day 1 Speaker Highlights

West
Thursday, June 20, 2013
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(Rendering courtesy Ken Yeang)

(Rendering courtesy Ken Yeang)

San Francisco Facades+ PERFORMANCE is only three weeks away! Connect with other architects, fabricators, developers, consultants, and other design professionals and earn up to 8 AIA LU credits per day at the conference, presented by AN and Enclos, July 11 to 12, 2013. Invaluable information, networking opportunities, and hands-on workshops are on the lineup for this year’s two-day event.

The symposium on Day 1 involves exciting presentations and discussion-based panels. Here are just a few of the speaker highlights on the agenda for Facades+.

Claire Maxfield, Director of Atelier Ten, in conjunction with Jeffrey Vaglio of Enclos, will offer introductory remarks on Day 1. Her expertise includes facade optimization and water systems.

More info on the symposium speakers after the jump.

Hollywood Towers To Be Slightly Less Gargantuan

West
Wednesday, June 19, 2013
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Plans for Millennium Hollywood, prior to the height change. (Millennium Hollywood)

Plans for Millennium Hollywood, prior to shrinkage. (Millennium Hollywood)

The developer of the two-tower Millennium Hollywood, located just next to the Capitol Records building in Hollywood, has agreed with the city of Los Angeles to limit the buildings’ heights to 35 and 39 stories, reports Curbed LA. The original proposal put forth heights of 485 and 585 feet (that’s roughly 48 and  58 stories). Millennium said that the total square footage of the project—more than one million square feet—and the number of residential (492) and hotel (200) units will not change. The agreement was reached at LA City Council’s Planning and Land Use Management Committee.

This means the buildings will dwarf the iconic Capitol Records building slightly less, although the move probably won’t soothe locals fears about increased congestion. Meanwhile according to the LA Times, the California Department of Transportation has accused city of officials of ignoring their concerns about the project’s impact on the city’s freeways. Stay tuned as this drama unfolds.

 

Q+A> Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher, SFMOMA Architecture & Design Curator

Newsletter, West
Tuesday, June 18, 2013
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Rendering of Snohetta's SFMOMA expansion currently under construction (left) and Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher (right).

Rendering of Snohetta’s SFMOMA expansion currently under construction (left) and Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher (right).

Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher was recently named the head of the department of architecture and design at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), filling a position vacated by Henry Urbach more than two years ago. Fletcher just completed a assessment of the museum’s architecture and design collection, and, most recently, she co-curated the exhibition Lebbeus Woods, Architect. She sat down with AN editors Nicole Anderson and Alan G. Brake to discuss her plans for the department.

The Architect’s Newspaper: What direction do you plan to take the architecture and design department?

Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher: The collection just turned 25 and so I think it was important that my colleague Joseph Becker and I, along with Henry Urbach, really undertook a collection analysis and are trying to draw on the identity and strengths of the collection: the experimental and conceptual architecture, the iconic chairs that capture every 20th century design movement, and then the Bay Area collection.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Seattle’s Frye Art Museum Presents “Buster Simpson // Surveyor”

West
Tuesday, June 18, 2013
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(Courtesy The Frye Art Museum)

(Courtesy The Frye Art Museum)

Buster Simpson // Surveyor
The Frye Art Museum
704 Terry Avenue, Seattle
Through October 13

Buster Simpson is a Seattle-based artist who has dedicated his artistic career to developing community-focused and urban environmentalist public art projects. For more than forty years he has created site-specific, agitation and propaganda works that have not only troubled neighborhoods to think about the health of their communities but also suggested local solutions to global issues. This exhibition at the Frye Art Museum features some of Simpson’s most compelling works, filled with explicit messages and rich metaphors, such as his “Hudson River Purge” (1991), a video performance in which he addresses the problem of acid rain by dropping 42 ½-pound soft limestone discs, or “antacid pills,” into the Hudson River, neutralizing the acidity of the water. This collection of Simpson’s public artwork celebrates his artistic legacy and captures the regional and global impact of his work.

Tonight> Los Angeles Design Festival Kicks Off Two Weeks Of Events

West
Friday, June 14, 2013
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ladf_01

Not busy enough, Los Angeles-based design people? You’re about to be. The third annual Los Angeles Design Festival, which takes place from June 13-30, kicks off tonight at 8:00p.m. with a party at Downtown’s Standard Hotel. The Festival, which encompasses a wide range of activities related to architecture, design, and art, has grown in size, now featuring over 40 events over two weeks.

This includes Dwell‘s west side home tours on June 15 and its east side tours on June 22; SCI-Arc’s Confederacy of Heretics symposium June 14-15; the A+D Museum’s gala Preview Party for their upcoming show Never Built: Los Angeles at Union Station on June 20; the AIA/LA’s Restaurant Design Awards on June 22; de LaB’s Pecha Kucha x Ping Pong, a competitive sharing of ideas at the Standard’s new ping pong club on June 26; and UCLA’s “Runway,” a series of back-to-back architecture presentations at the school’s new Hercules Campus in Playa Vista on June 28. The closing event is at Chinatown Design Night on June 29. This is just the tip of the iceberg, so better clear your calendars!

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