LACMA Controversy Stirs Up Memories of LA’s Past Environmental Disasters

West
Friday, September 20, 2013
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lacma_zumthor_01

Zumthor’s design could disrupt the La Brea Tar Pits (Museum Associates)

Peter Zumthor’s design for a new central building at LACMA has some experts concerned with its environmental effects. Critics including John Harris, chief curator of the National History Museum’s Page Museum, worry that the project could disrupt the La Brea tar pits, the same ecological features that inspired the building’s blob-like shape. At a meeting last month the county Board of Supervisors voted 4-0 to request a presentation from the Page Museum fleshing out the curator’s concerns. That presentation has not yet been scheduled, according to the Page Museum’s press office.

Continue reading after the jump.

Renovation Team Announced for Philip Johnson’s Crystal Cathedral in Anaheim

Newsletter, West
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
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Philip Johnson's Crystal Cathedral (left), Richard Neutra's Tower of Hope (center), and Richard Meier's Center for Possibility Thinking (right). (Diocese of Orange)

Philip Johnson’s Crystal Cathedral (left), Richard Neutra’s Tower of Hope (center), and Richard Meier’s Center for Possibility Thinking (right). (Courtesy Diocese of Orange)

Anaheim’s Crystal Cathedral, designed by Philip Johnson in 1980, and containing more than 10,000 panes of mirrored glass, is one of Orange County’s rare architectural treasures. Today the Roman Catholic Diocese, which purchased the church last year, announced that Johnson Fain and Rios Clementi Hale will be leading its $29 million renovation. The exterior of the building will be essentially unchanged outside of cleaning and replacing damaged glass, but the interior will be heavily remodeled to upgrade access, sight lines, finishes, and environmental comfort. The renovation will also add significant new elements to adapt to the church’s new Catholic focus (it had once been an evangelical church), including a new altar, a baptismal font, and new cathedral doors. “It’s an open palette inside,” said Diocese spokesperson Ryan Lilyengren, who likened the iconic exterior to a shell.

Continue reading after the jump.

First Doggy Doo-Doo in Flight: HNTB Designs a Pet Potty at San Diego Airport

Eavesdroplet, West
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
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(Montage by AN)

(Montage by AN)

Are you afraid of taking Rover with you on your next flight because he might have to go potty in the airport? Well, pet-packing passengers flying through San Diego’s Lindbergh Field can rest easy. The airport’s recent $1 billion “Green Build” Terminal 2 expansion includes the nation’s first and only “pet relief” comfort station. Located between gates 46 and 47, the 75-square-foot rest room is decked out with features to get your four-legged friend in the mood to go, including ersatz grass and a fire hydrant. This may be the first, but it won’t be the last. Tom Rossbach, director of aviation architecture at HNTB, told the San Diego Union-Tribune that the firm is offering the amenity to its other airport clients.

Watch a video tour after the jump.

Website Offers Tour Inside SOM’s Mauna Kea Beach Hotel

West
Monday, September 16, 2013
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Manta Ray Point. (Aimee Vogelgesang)

Manta Ray Point. (Aimee Vogelgesang)

Located on the paradisiacal island of Hawaii, the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (SOM) has been critically acclaimed by architectural experts and luxury aficionados for its modest yet stunning elegance. In celebration of its classic design and architectural beauty, the hotel has launched a microsite where tourists can read about the resort’s history, virtually explore its modernist look, and take a sneak peak at hotel founder Laurance S. Rockefeller’s private 1,600-piece art collection.

Continue reading after the jump.

Flight Delays: “Lack of Sophistication” Delays Public Art LAX’s New Tom Bradley Terminal

Eavesdroplet, West
Friday, September 13, 2013
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Inside Fentress Architects' Tom Bradley terminal at LAX. (Jason A. Knowles)

Inside Fentress Architects’ Tom Bradley terminal at LAX. (Jason A. Knowles)

LAX finally opened its shiny new Tom Bradley terminal, designed by Fentress Architects, to quite a hullabaloo in July. The throngs who showed up for “Appreciation Days” got to enjoy shopping, music, and even free LAX keychains and knickknacks. But one of the most prominent elements was missing: the public art. Major pieces by Ball-Nogues, Pae White, and Mark Bradford were all delayed for what one participant called “a lack of sophistication on LAX’s part” in shepherding such work through. In other words, the officials didn’t get how to pull this kind of thing off. Well never fear, despite the bumps, contract disputes, and many miscues, the installations will begin opening in late September and continue through the end of the year. Better late than never.

Proposal to Build a Park Atop Los Angeles’ 101 Freeway Gets Big Push From City

West
Thursday, September 12, 2013
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Conceptual rendering of a 101 Freeway Cap Park developed by AECOM.

Conceptual rendering of a 101 Freeway Cap Park developed by AECOM.

In recent years several proposals have been floated for freeway cap parks in Los Angeles with barely any traction. Until now. On Friday LA City Council voted to have various city departments (including planning and engineering) partner with nonprofit Friends of Park 101 to raise funds for a park that would bridge the 101 Freeway, connecting Downtown’s Civic Center with Olvera Street and Union Station. Possible grants could come from local, state, and federal sources. It’s still a long way from happening, but this is a big deal. Friends of the Hollywood Central Park have created a function on their web site where users can design their own cap park, but if Park 101 gets some of these funds we could be building a park downtown for real.

First Steps At Los Angeles’ Pershing Square

City Terrain, West
Friday, September 6, 2013
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Gensler's conceptual design concept for Pershing Square (Gensler)

Gensler’s conceptual design concept for Pershing Square. (Courtesy Gensler)

Last week Los Angeles councilman, Jose Huizar, announced the formation of a 21-member task force to help re-imagine Pershing Square, the beleaguered central park in the middle of downtown. The group includes local residents, design and architecture experts, business people, and government officials. Huizar said he hoped they could bring “a wide-range of ideas and perspectives to the discussion.” They’ll also have to develop an agenda and a timeline, and figure out how to fund the project.

COntinue reading after the jump.

AECOM Selected To Design New Arena for the NBA’s Sacramento Kings

West
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
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(AECOM)

(Courtesy AECOM)

AECOM, already busy working with Snøhetta on a basketball arena in San Francisco, has been chosen to design the new downtown basketball facility for the Sacramento Kings. Renderings for the  project, set to open by 2016, will not be released until the fall, but earlier images, released when the ownership team was still competing for the site, show a pillow-shaped, glass ringed structure with a steep seating bowl and, rare for such a facility, natural light.

Read More

OMA’s Santa Monica Scheme Sent Back To The Drawing Board; BIG Back In The Running

Newsletter, West
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
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Rendering of The Plaza at Santa Monica (OMA/ Metropolitan Pacific Capital)

Rendering of The Plaza at Santa Monica (OMA/ Metropolitan Pacific Capital)

Back in July it looked like Rem Koolhaas was about to land his first large-scale commission in Los Angeles with The Plaza at Santa Monica, a mega-mixed-use complex that would have graced a city-owned parcel at Fourth and Arizona streets. City officials seemed genuinely wowed by OMA’s theatrically-terraced design and a city selection committee recommended to Santa Monica City Council that they enter formal contract negotiations with the project’s developer, Metropolitan Pacific Capital.

But last week, the city council issued a resounding, “Not so fast,” voting almost unanimously against the recommendation, citing concerns over a lack of affordable housing.

Read More

Letter to the Editor> Master Architect or No, Gehry is Wrong About Los Angeles

Letter to the Editor, West
Friday, August 30, 2013
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(Joel Mann / Flickr; Montage by AN)

(Joel Mann / Flickr; Montage by AN)

[ Editor's Note: The following is a reader-submitted comment from the AN Blog in response to the post, “Gehry Lets Loose on Los Angeles, Downtown Ambitions,” which cites an interview Frank Gehry did with Los Angeles Magazine. It appeared as a letter to the editor in a recent print edition, AN07_08.14.2013. Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

The only thing that makes Los Angeles unique is that so much of it was built during the auto era (albeit on an infrastructural framework established during the interurban rail era). Different parts of Los Angeles were developed in a manner that was identical to how other cities across North America were being developed at the same time. The same succession of transportation, construction, and development technologies created a downtown in Los Angeles that is nearly indistinguishable from portions of San Francisco, Chicago, and Manhattan.

Continue reading after the jump.

New Mural Ordinance Opens Floodgates For Art in Los Angeles

West
Friday, August 30, 2013
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Untitled, by Mister Cartoon & El T Loko (Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles)

Untitled, by Mister Cartoon & El T Loko (Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles)

Finally. Los Angeles’ City Council on Wednesday passed a new mural ordinance, legalizing murals on private buildings after a decade of banning them. Of course would-be public artists still have to go through an extensive permitting process, and pay a$60 fee, but if they’re persistent they can finally go crazy. That is, as long as their murals don’t contain commercial messages.

“It’s a big victory and we’re thrilled,” said Isabel Rojas-Williams, executive director of the Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles. The group has been protecting the city’s murals and muralists since 1987. “Despite the recent restrictions, the city has remained one of the country’s mural capitals.”

Don’t believe us? Behold a selection below of our favorite (finally-sanctioned) murals from around the City of Angels, courtesy of the Mural Conservancy. They range from political to historical to street art / graffiti, to, well…the undefinable. Read More

Studios at the Ranch: Disney Makes Move to “Hollywood North”

West
Thursday, August 29, 2013
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Studios at the Ranch (Disney)

Studios at the Ranch (Disney)

On Tuesday, Los Angeles County’s Board of Supervisors voted to approve Disney’s huge new TV and film production facility on the Golden Oak Ranch near Santa Clarita. The project is being master planned by LA-based firm, Johnson Fain, and the 58-acre “Studios at the Ranch” will include more than 500,000 square feet of studios, sound stages, offices, writers and producers “bungalows” and other developments.

Continue reading after the jump.

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