On View> “Roads of Arabia” Exhibition on Saudi Arabian Archaeology Opens December 19 in Houston

Art, On View, Southwest
Wednesday, December 18, 2013
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(Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts Houston)

(Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts Houston)

Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
The Museum of Fine Arts Houston
5601 Main Street
Houston, Texas
December 19 through March 9, 2014

The Museum of Fine Arts Houston (MFAH) is hosting an eye-opening exhibition this winter that will uncover the rich history of the ancient trade routes of the Arabian Peninsula. Organized by the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C., in association with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities (SCTA), Roads of Arabia will feature objects recently excavated from more than 10 archaeological sites, and give insight into the culture and economy of this ancient civilization. Recently discovered objects along the trade routes include alabaster bowls and fragile glassware as well as heavy gold earrings and monumental statues. All of the artifacts are testament to the lively exchange between Arabs and their neighbors, including the Egyptians, Syrians, Babylonians, and Greco-Romans.

On View> The Indianapolis Museum of Art Presents “Impressed: Modern Japanese Prints”

Art, Midwest, On View
Friday, December 13, 2013
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(Courtesy Indianapolis Museum of Art)

(Courtesy Indianapolis Museum of Art)

 

Impressed: Modern Japanese Prints
Indianapolis Museum of Art
4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis, IN
Through January 26, 2014

In traditional Japanese woodblock printing, a team of four artists worked to create a single piece. In this collaboration, the publisher directed the designer, the engraver, and the printer to apply their respective artisan skills for the creation of a final artwork. During the early 20th century, however, a new printmaking method arose in Japan, transforming the group project into an independent endeavor. The Sosaku hanga, “creative prints,” school of printmakers became the first solo artists in Japanese woodblock printing, designing and executing every aspect of their artworks by their own hand.

Currently on exhibit at the Indianapolis Museum of Art is a collection of these masterpieces, including some the best known Sosaku hanga printmakers from the last century. Running through January 26, Impressed: Modern Japanese Prints explores the effects of blossoming individualism on woodblock prints. Distinguished by intricate detailing and the look of a highly texturized surface, the exhibition’s display of print works by Tajima Hiroyuki, Iwami Reika, Saito Kiyoshi, and Maki Haku shows that artists of this movement considered the woodblock print an art form, not a commercial venture.

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On View> “AFRITECTURE: Building Social Change” Explores the Best Architecture of Social Engagement

International, On View
Friday, December 6, 2013
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Floating School in Lagos, Nigeria. (Iwan Baan)

Floating School in Lagos, Nigeria. (Iwan Baan)

When Andres Lepik was a curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, he organized and curated Small Scale, Big Change: New Architectures of Social Engagement (2011). It was a landmark show for MoMA and identified a developing design trend of socially engaged projects aimed not at “grand manifestos” but to ones committed to “radical pragmatism.” Now back in Germany, Lepik has curated an equally ground breaking exhibition on social design. The exhibit Afritecture: Building Social Change at the TU Munich Architecture Museum rightly focuses on the African content as the most exciting and creative place for todays architecture of social engagement.

More after the jump.

Review> LOT-EK Designs the Exhibition, Erasmus Effect, On the Past and Future of Italian Architecture

International, On View
Friday, December 6, 2013
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(Cecilia Florenza)

(Cecilia Florenza)

The Erasmus Effect: Italian Architect’s Abroad
MAXXI Museum
Rome, Italy
Through April 6, 2014

The architecture and urbanism of Italy has long been an inspiration to architects from other parts of the world. From the grand tours of Lord Burlington and Thomas Jefferson to the establishment of the American, French, and British Academies, Robert Venturi’s lessons learned from Rome, and the enormous influence of Manfredo Tafuri, Italy has been important to how we view architecture and livable cities. But now an exhibition, The Erasmus Effect: Italian Architect’s Abroad, opening today at Rome’s MAXXI Museum details how the world is enriched when Italian born and educated architects emigrate and find success abroad.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> “UNESCOitalia: Italy’s World Heritage Sites” Opens December 6th in San Francisco

On View, West
Thursday, December 5, 2013
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The Cloisters of St. Andrea Cathedral. (Luciano Romano)

The Cloisters of St. Andrea Cathedral. (Luciano Romano)

UNESCOitalia: Italy’s World Heritage Sites in the Works of 14 Photographers
Mueso Italo Americano
Fort Mason Center, Building C
San Francisco
December 6 to January 26, 2014

In celebration of 2013: The Year of Italian Culture in the United States, the Museo Italo Americano, in partnership with the Italian Cultural Institute and the Consulate General of Italy in San Francisco, will be showcasing a collection of images of Italy’s UNESCO World Heritage sites as seen through the lenses of 14 prominent Italian photographers.

Continue reading after the jump.

Review> Rem Koolhaas Designs an Exhibition on the Architect Auguste Perret

International, Newsletter, On View
Wednesday, December 4, 2013
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Exhibition view. (Florian Kleinefenn)

Exhibition view. (Florian Kleinefenn)

Auguste Perret: Eight Masterpieces !/?
Through February 19, 2014

The exhibition, Auguste Perret: Eight Masterpieces !/?, is really about dualities: the subject of the exhibition, the architect Perret (1874-1954), an architectural innovator in reinforced concrete, and the exhibition’s designer Rem Koolhaas/OMA; and the historical perspective of Perret by the “scientific” curator, Joseph Abram, and the forward-looking interpretations by “artistic” curator, Koolhaas. This interplay is symbolized by the exclamation point/question mark at the end of the exhibition title.

Continue reading after the jump.

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On View> Form/Unformed: Design from 1960 to the Present

On View, Southwest
Wednesday, December 4, 2013
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(Courtesy The Dallas Museum of Art)

(Courtesy The Dallas Museum of Art)

Form/Unformed: Design from 1960 to the Present
The Dallas Museum of Art
1717 North Harwood Street
Dallas, TX
Extended through December 2014

The Dallas Museum of Art is celebrating the work of prolific designers and architects from the 1960s to the present with its first comprehensive design exhibition. Some of the featured designers include Robert Venturi, Frank Gehry, Aldo Rossi, Zaha Hadid, and Donald Judd. Drawn entirely from the Museum’s own collection, the exhibition reveals the evolution of forms and ideologies that have shaped international design over the last half century.

“Several of the works on view are recent acquisitions that reflect the continuing expansion of the Museum’s decorative arts and design program to include historic American and European work, as well as contemporary objects of international significance,” said Bonnie Pitman, The Eugene McDermott Director of the Dallas Museum of Art. From modern jewelry like The Golden Fleece, to iconic furniture, the exhibition spotlights the extraordinary work of some of the best designers of our time.

On View> MoMA Explores Dante Ferretti’s Design for the Big Screen

East, On View
Monday, November 25, 2013
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MoMA's Titus Lobby, May 1939. (Robert Damora)

MoMA’s Titus Lobby, May 1939. (Robert Damora)

Dante Ferretti: Design and Construction for the Cinema
Museum of Modern Art
The Roy and Niuta Titus Galleries and the Film Lobby
Dante Ferretti: Designing for the Big Screen
The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters
Through February 9, 2014

When you enter the Film Entrance to the Museum of Modern Art at 11 West 53rd Street, you are greeted by two large lions. No, you are not 11 blocks south at the New York Public LIbrary, nor are you in Venice, Italy. You are entering the world of Dante Ferretti, the 70-year old multi–Academy Award–winning art director of films, opera, exhibitions, and even two New York City restaurants, Salumeria Rosi (design inspired by a scene in Federico Fellini’s Satyricon). Large, muscular, physically confident objects dot the floor—the clock-face from Hugo (Martin Scorsese, 2011), Art Deco chandeliers from Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1975), and Arcimboldo figures comprised of vegetables, fruits and flowers (Milan World Expo, 2015). But these are actually lightweight, ephemeral objects made of fiberglass and not meant to last beyond the creation of the film or duration of the event. The clock and chandeliers were on the cusp of being tossed when curators Jytte Jensen and Ron Magliozzi salvaged them.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> “Marc Newson: At Home” Opens on November 23 at The Philadelphia Museum of Art

East, On View
Wednesday, November 20, 2013
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Lockheed Lounge, 1988. Designed by Marc Newson, Australian, born 1963. Riveted aluminum, fiberglass, rubberized paint (Photography Karin Catt / Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art)

Lockheed Lounge, 1988. Designed by Marc Newson, Australian, born 1963. Riveted aluminum, fiberglass, rubberized paint (Photography Karin Catt / Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art)

Nearly three decades after he was launched into design stardom by his biomorphic, aluminum Lockhead Lounge (above), famed Australian industrial designer Marc Newson will soon receive his first solo museum exhibition in the United States. Presented by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, “Marc Newson: At Home” will collect furniture, clothing, appliances, and Newsons’ 021C Ford concept car within a mock, six-room home in the museum’s Collab Gallery. Gathered from collections across Europe, Japan, and the United States, in addition to Newson’s personal cache, the objects on display will highlight the various facets of the designer’s distinctive style of flowing lines, bulbous forms, bright colors, and industrial references which helped to define an era of industrial design. The exhibition opens November 23rd and runs until April 20, 2014.

Continue reading after the jump.

Susan Morris Surveys the 4th Edition of New York’s Documentary Film Festival, DOC NYC

East, On View
Friday, November 15, 2013
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Still from If You Build It. (Courtesy Long Shot Factory Release)

Still from If You Build It. (Courtesy Long Shot Factory Release)

DOC NYC
New York City
November 14-21
IFC Center and SVA Theater

This year the 4th DOC NYC documentary film festival boasts 132 films and events: 73 feature-length, 39 shorts, and 20 panels. Tucked into the schedule are films about architecture, design, and the arts amongst a wide array of subjectmatter. Only one, If You Build It, was also seen at the recent Architecture & Design Film Festival, so here’s your chance to view a new crop and to see the ones you’ve missed.

Continue reading after the jump.

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On View> Glen Small In Recovery Opens In Los Angeles On November 9

On View, West
Friday, November 8, 2013
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03-glen-small-exhibit-archpaper

The West Coast architect Glen Small has now been largely forgotten, but from the 1960s through the 1980s he was at the center of architectural experimentation and ecological consciousness in California. His journey from an early founder of SCI-Arc and a pioneer of Califorinia environmentalism was documented in a biopic My Father, The Genius made by his talented film maker daughter Lucia Small.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> A Report From the 2013 Milan Triennale

On View
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
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An auto-production line is part of Best Up.

An auto-production line is part of the Best Up exhibition.

The current Milan Triennale exhibition, running through December 2013, is on view in the city’s Palace of Art building, part of Parco Sempione, the park grounds adjacent to Castello Sforzesco. Nancy Goldring visited the exhibit for AN and reports back on the highlights of the exhibit.

When you enter the Milan Triennale, there is a line-up of fanciful chairs—rather a small version of Lucas Samaras’ great show at the Whitney. But the exhibition itself promises a much more serious consideration of the world of design. The Association for Industrial Design (ADI) added a new category to its 2010 Trienniale Design: Service Design. This year in Design for Living, Luisa Bocchietto and the Triennale committee have added yet another new section—Social Design—those who have offered examples of responsible design, an attempt to get away from simply the design of beautiful objects and to focus on the activities of designers who are trying to make a contribution to the way we live and change the systems themselves.

Continue reading after the jump.

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