One Small Step For Houston is One Giant Step Backward for Johnson Space Center

One of Johnson Space Center's control rooms (Photo Courtesy of NASA)

One of Johnson Space Center’s control rooms (Courtesy NASA)

AN recently profiled the emerging architectural typology of spaceports across the country, and now there’s news from the Houston site that helped launch the dream of space travel decades ago. Independence Shuttle, a full-scale replica of NASA’s iconic Space Shuttle, recently was moved from the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to its next-door neighbor, Space Center Houston.

To some people, the relocation was a matter of mere logistics. To others, however, the transfer symbolized not just a lessening of power and precedence associated with Johnson Space Center, but with NASA’s space program as a whole.

Continue reading after the jump.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s only handicap-accessible home opens for public tours

Frank Lloyd Wright's Laurent House at dusk. (Nels Akerlund)

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Laurent House at dusk. (Nels Akerlund)

Decades before the Americans With Disabilities Act, Frank Lloyd Wright designed an accessible home for a World War II veteran. Now Wright’s only home designed for a person with a disability will open to the public. Wright’s Kenneth & Phyllis Laurent House in Rockford, Illinois opens for tours on June 6, two days before what would have been its architect’s 147th birthday.

Continue reading after the jump.

“Tilt!” tips tourists out from Chicago’s John Hancock Tower

Midwest, News, Skyscrapers
Monday, May 12, 2014
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"Tilt!," a new attraction at Chicago's John Hancock Center, opened this weekend. (360Chicago)

“Tilt!,” a new attraction at Chicago’s John Hancock Center, opened this weekend. (360Chicago)

Visitors to Chicago’s John Hancock Tower this weekend were, of course, treated to the skyscraper’s stunning views of Lake Michigan and downtown Chicago, but the thrill-seekers among them also had another option. On the 94th floor, up to eight people at a time can stand in a glass box that tilts out 20 degrees, dangling them 1,000 feet above the street.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> bKL Architecture cooks up a replacement for Chicago’s Howard Johnson Motel

720 N. LaSalle (Courtesy bKL Architecture)

720 N. LaSalle (Courtesy bKL Architecture)

bKL Architecture is going as bullish as any Chicago-based firm in this start-and-stop economy, embarking on big commissions in Beijing and Toronto while committing to more and more work at home. The firm bunks with Magellan Development in ground floor offices at Aqua Tower and has partnered with the Lakeshore East progenitor on a number of buildings including two phases of the new GEMS Academy private school.

And now that kinship is extending into River North. Fresh off the drafting table is a 38-story rental tower slated for 720 North LaSalle Street (at Superior) on the present site of a Howard Johnson Inn, one of downtown Chicago’s last remaining suburban-style motels—and a relic of affordability.

Continue reading after the jump.

Herzog & de Meuron Wins Bid For First Canadian Project at the Vancouver Art Gallery

(Courtesy Vancouver Art Gallery)

Site of the new facility to be designed by Herzog & de Meuron. (Courtesy Vancouver Art Gallery)

02-vancouver-art-museum-herzog-de-meuron

(Courtesy Vancouver Art Gallery)

Herzog & de Meuron will be designing the new Vancouver Art Gallery. The plan will double the size of the 300,000 square foot existing institution.The new Vancouver Art Gallery will be the Swiss firm’s first Canadian project.

HdM was selected out of the shortlist that consisted of Diller Scofidio + Renfro (New York), Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects (New York), KPMB Architects (Toronto), and SANAA (Tokyo). The finalists, announced in January, were chosen out of 75 firms from 16 countries who submitted to an open Request for Qualifications process issued by the gallery.

Conceptual designs are expected to be revealed in early 2015.

New York Public Library Closes the Book on Foster + Partners Renovation Plan

The New Reading Room would have replaced the stacks.

The New Reading Room would have replaced the stacks. (Courtesy Foster + Partners / dbox)

The New York Public Library has canceled its controversial renovation plan by Foster + Partners, according to a report in the New York Times. The plan, which would have removed the historic book stacks and turned the non-lending research library into a circulating library, was widely opposed by scholars, writers, and architectural historians.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City Calls For Free, Outdoor Wi-Fi Network With Reinvented Payphones

City Terrain, East, News, Urbanism
Wednesday, May 7, 2014
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NYFi proposal by Sage and Coomber Architects

NYFi proposal by Sage and Coombe Architects. (Courtesy Sage & Coombe)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has issued an RFP to create a network of free, outdoor Wi-Fi hotspots across all five boroughs. The network would become one of the largest in the country, and have a significant impact on the city’s streetscape. That’s because the plan transforms New York’s aging system of payphones—commonly known today as al fresco “toilets”—with what are being described by the city as public connection points.

Continue reading after the jump.

A New Gang In Lower Manhattan: Chicago’s Studio Gang Architects Opens New York City Office

An early version of the Solar Carve tower by Studio Gang

An early version of the Solar Carve tower by Studio Gang. (Courtesy Studio Gang)

Chicago‘s most famous architect has just acquired a New York City pied-à-terre. Studio Gang has opened an office on Water Street in Lower Manhattan, which will be led by Weston Walker, a design principal. “This is a natural next step for the firm,” said founding principal Jeanne Gang in a statement. “We have been working in New York for the past several years and are excited by the variety of work currently in design, along with potential engagements in the city and beyond.”

The firm is currently working on a Fire Rescue facility for the New York City Department of Design and Construction and on the “Solar Carve” tower adjacent to the High Line. That project met resistance from the community for its height. There is no word yet on how tall it will be or how it will be redesigned.

Developer scales back Clark & Belmont mid-rise for Chicago’s Lakeview neighborhood

Midwest, News
Tuesday, May 6, 2014
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03b-clark-belmont-tower-chicago-archpaper03a-clark-belmont-tower-chicago-archpaper

Six months after its proposal for a mid-sized development on the site of Chicago’s one-time “punk rock donut shop” raised height concerns, developer BlitzLake Capital Partners has scaled back its plans. Now the mixed-use development at the corner of Belmont and Clark in the Lakeview neighborhood is hoping for eight stories instead of 11.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page Architects Transforming Basement Tunnels at Houston’s Niels Esperson Building

News, Preservation, Southwest
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
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Renderings of the lobby after the basement's reconstruction (Photo Courtesty of pagethink.com)

Renderings of the lobby after the basement’s reconstruction. (Courtesy Page)

The historic Niels Esperson Building has lit up the Houston skyline since 1927, but far below the tower’s neo-Classical cupola, a basement space connecting to a series of tunnels meandering underneath the city has remained out of the spotlight. Now, the building’s basement gets to play catch up in the fame game with a $2.5 million renovation spearheaded by architectural firm Page.

Continue reading after the jump.

Long Island College Hospital Could Get The Residential Tower Treatment [UPDATED]

Long Island College Hospital. (Flickr / Chris Morgan)

Long Island College Hospital. (Flickr / Chris Morgan)

After a long and heated fight to save Brooklyn’s Long Island College Hospital from demolition, the site’s future as a medical center has been cemented. But along with the full-service hospital could come two residential towers that are significantly taller than anything in the predominantly-brownstone Cobble Hill neighborhood.

Just how high could the towers rise?

Here’s Your Chance To Live in a Frank Lloyd Wright House For the Weekend

Frank Lloyd Wright's Emil Bach House, 7415 N. Sheridan Rd.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Emil Bach House, 7415 N. Sheridan Rd.

A recently restored Frank Lloyd Wright house on Chicago’s far North Side will be open for weekly tours this summer, starting May 7. The Emil Bach House, 7415 North Sheridan Road, is a Chicago Landmark and an entry on the National Register of Historic Places. As a vacation rental, the carefully crafted private dwelling invites Wright enthusiasts to stay a while.

Continue reading after the jump.

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