Motor City’s first buffered bike lanes planned for Midtown

Detroit's 2nd Avenue is the target of a substantial road diet that may include the Motor City's first buffered bike lanes. (Curbed Detroit)

Detroit’s 2nd Avenue is the target of a substantial road diet that may include the Motor City’s first buffered bike lanes. (Curbed Detroit)

Given the severity and number of challenges facing Detroit, streetscape improvements might not seem like a very high priority. But in the Motor City’s Midtown, one of the city’s relatively resurgent neighborhoods, a local planning non-profit is betting that encouraging more bicyclists and pedestrians will be a boon for the area. As a result, Detroit may soon get its first buffered bike lanes. Between Temple Street and Warren Avenue, Midtown’s 2nd Avenue is the target of a substantial road diet, as first reported by ModeShiftRead More

Chicago Transit Authority’s Belmont Bypass would raze 16 parcels

Midwest, News
Tuesday, June 17, 2014
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Rendering of the proposed Belmont Bypass. (Courtesy CTA)

Rendering of the proposed Belmont Bypass. (Courtesy CTA)

As part of a plan to reorganize a busy elevated train station on Chicago’s North Side, the Chicago Transit Authority has released a list of buildings it needs to raze to ease delays for 150,000 riders daily. The mostly residential buildings, as well as 11 vacant lots, would be occupied by a train bypass CTA has proposed to help untangle the knot of Red, Purple, and Brown Line trains at the Clark junction just north of the Belmont ‘El’ station.

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Philadelphia Expected to Launch Bikeshare System Next Spring

A painted bike lane in Philadelphia. (Flickr / karmacamilleeon)

A painted bike lane in Philadelphia. (Flickr / karmacamilleeon)

With a recent vote in the Philadelphia City Council, bikeshare moves closer to becoming a reality in the City of Brotherly Love. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that the council’s Transportation and Public Utilities Committee advanced a bill to bring bikeshare to the city by next spring. The bill is expected to be approved by the full city council on June 19.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Brooklyn’s Kentile Floors Sign to Be Disassembled And Relocated

Design, East, News, Preservation
Friday, June 13, 2014
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The Kentile Floors sign in 2004. (Ranjit / Flickr)

The Kentile Floors sign in 2004. (Ranjit / Flickr)

A compromise has been reached in the heated battle over the fate of Brooklyn’s iconic Kentile Floors sign. The New York Times reported that the sign’s owner will dismantle the structure and donate its red letters to the Gowanus Alliance, a local group which plans to reinstall the sign nearby. For that to happen, though, the eight-story, 50-year-old sign must first be removed from its current rooftop home without breaking. “There are some hurdles to clear,” reported the Times. “The permits require that the 20-foot-high letters be reduced to four-by-four-foot sections and sent down a debris chute off the roof.” City Councilman Brad Lander, who recently launched a petition to save the sign, told the paper he hopes the letters can be removed with a pulley and not “crammed down a chute.”

 

 

Garrison Architects Debuts Post-Disaster Housing for New York City

Architecture, East, News
Thursday, June 12, 2014
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The structure's exterior. (Gothamist / Jake Dobkin)

The structure’s exterior. (Gothamist / Jake Dobkin)

New York City’s Office of Emergency Management has opened a full-scale prototype of its temporary housing units that would shelter those displaced from the next Sandy-like storm. The OEM describes “The Urban Post-Disaster Housing Prototype Program,” as a “multi-story, multi-family interim housing solution that will work in urban areas across the country.” The prefabricated structures are designed by Garrison Architects and intended to be dispatched quickly after an emergency and assembled on-site.

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Santa Monica Radio Station KCRW Breaks Ground on New Headquarters by Clive Wilkinson Architects

Architecture, News, West
Thursday, June 12, 2014
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KCRW HQ (KCRW)

KCRW’s new campus (KCRW/ Clive Wilkinson Architects)

Yesterday Santa Monica radio station KCRW broke ground on its new hub, which will bring it out of a basement at Santa Monica College and into the architectural spotlight. The 35,000 square foot building, designed by Clive Wilkinson Architects, will be located on the college’s future Entertainment and Technology Campus, in the city’s creative business district, along the Expo line. Wilkinson won the commission back in 2008, but the bold, colorful design has developed significantly since then.

Continue reading after the jump.

Urbanism Giants, Gehl and Rebar, Join Forces To Create Gehl Studio

Gehl created a roadmap for rethinking New York's streetscapes, like Times Square. (NYDOT)

Gehl created a roadmap for rethinking New York’s streetscapes, like Times Square. (NYDOT)

Two global urbanistic powerhouses, San Francisco–based Rebar and Copenhagen-based Gehl Architects, have joined forces to create Gehl Studio. The practices will keep their offices in their respective cities and start a new one in New York. Gehl didn’t purchase Rebar, but hired most of Rebar’s staff, including two of the three founding partners, according to a report in Landscape Architecture Magazine.

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Art installation wraps up Cleveland Public Library garden with 15,000 feet of rope

Art, Midwest, News, On View
Wednesday, June 11, 2014
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"drawing lines" by Mexican arhitect Ivan Juarez is the fifth installation in the Cleveland Public Library's "See Also" public art series. (Cleveland Public Library)

“drawing lines” by Mexican architect Ivan Juarez is the fifth installation in the Cleveland Public Library’s “See Also” public art series. (Cleveland Public Library)

June brought good weather to Cleveland, and those who rang in summer with a visit to the Cleveland Public Library encountered an airy installation of white frames and threads crisscrossing the Eastman Reading Garden.

It’s not the first piece of public art to active the space outside the Cleveland Public Library. Last year a giant reading nest designed by LAND Studio and New York artist Mark Reigelman took wing in the library’s Eastman Reading Garden.

Continue reading after the jump.

Cleveland approves neighborhood plans to bring new life to first ring suburbs

City Terrain, Midwest, News, Urbanism
Wednesday, June 11, 2014
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draft_duckisland_nabe-plan-cleveland

Aerial rendering from the Duck Island neighborhood plan.

The Cleveland neighborhoods of Kinsman, Duck Island, and West 65th Street could eventually get major updates now that three new plans have won unanimous approval from the city’s planning commission. All three neighborhoods were built when Cleveland’s industrial heyday propelled a boom of real estate development that has long since given way to depopulation. In Kinsman, on the city’s far East Side, the plan proposed creating an arts and entertainment district. The Duck Island plan focused on multi-modal transportation hubs, and the plan focusing on the West 65th Street neighborhood called for a two-mile multi-purpose trail. Funding for most of the work is still undetermined, but the city has committed some money for bike lanes, curb extensions, and other local improvements already called for in the three plans.

Washington Monument Re-Opens to the Public: Celebrate With These 22 Beautiful Photos

The Washington Monument stands tall over Washington, D.C. at sunset. (Victoria Pickering / Flickr)

The Washington Monument stands tall over Washington, D.C. at sunset. (Victoria Pickering / Flickr)

After two-and-a-half years of repairs, the Washington Monument is officially back open to the public. The District’s tallest structure had been closed since 2011, when a 5.8 magnitude earthquake sent more than 150 cracks shooting through the 555-feet of marble.

Continue reading after the jump.

Van Alen Institute Convenes International Council of Architects in Venice

The Van Alen Council meets in Venice. (Beppe Ferrari)

The Van Alen Council meets in Venice. (Beppe Ferrari)

This week in Venice, the New York–based Van Alen Institute convened a group of leaders at 13 top architecture firms to brainstorm ideas that will guide the non-profit institution with an increased international perspective. The group will meet twice a year “to identify and investigate issues facing cities internationally, and to guide the impact of the Institute’s public programming, research, and design competitions,” according to a press release from Van Alen. The goal is to find topics that the institute can explore more deeply in its ongoing efforts such as Elsewhere: Escape and the Urban Landscape exploring our relationship with urban life.

Continue reading after the jump.

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A Gravity-Free Leap in Commercial Space Travel

News, Southwest
Thursday, June 5, 2014
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(Courtesy gizmag.com)

(Courtesy gizmag.com)

Buckle up: the gap between commercial space travel and the present moment is rapidly narrowing. Virgin Galactic and Spaceport America (designed by Foster + Partners) recently signed an agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration granting access to airspace in New Mexico, with designs to turn the ground beneath into a commercial spaceflight center.

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