Neutra and Alexander’s Orange Coast College buildings facing threat

Neutra and Alexander's Business Education Building (Les Katow)

Neutra and Alexander’s Business Education Building (Les Katow)

Here at AN we’ve seen our share of Richard Neutra tear downs in recent years. The latest possible victim is Neutra and Robert Alexander’s campus-wide buildings at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa, which are being threatened by the school’s bond-supported Vision 2020 plan (pdf). If the plan passes the school could tear down the duo’s classrooms, library, business education building, and science wing, as well as extensive landscaping by famed landscape architect Garrett Eckbo, in favor of new buildings, an Urban Street, and a Grand Lawn. The undertaking would be largely funded by 2012′s $698 million Bond Measure R, and total about 250,000 square feet of new construction.

Continue reading after the jump.

West 8 unveils plans for massive park in Hong Kong’s West Kowloon

West Kowloon Cultural District (Courtesy West 8)

West Kowloon Cultural District (Courtesy West 8)

The West Kowloon Cultural District Authority (WKCDA) has released concept images for their waterfront park in the West Kowloon Cultural District. Once installed, the park will be a breath of fresh air (both literally and figuratively) for residents in the urban sprawl of Hong Kong, China. Read More

Julian Castro Sworn In As Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

Castro at today's swearing-in. (Courtesy Department of Housing and Urban Development)

Castro at today’s swearing-in. (Courtesy Department of Housing and Urban Development)

Julian Castro, the former mayor of San Antonio, was sworn in Tuesday as the country’s next Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Castro succeeds Shaun Donovan who was tapped to head the Office of Management and Budget. During Donovan’s tenure at HUD, he oversaw the Rebuild by Design competition, which selected its winners earlier this summer. Among his many responsibilities in his new role, Castro will likely be heavily involved in the execution of those projects, which include work from BIG, SCAPE, Penn Design/OLIN, OMA, Interboro, and MIT.

How New York’s “Poor Door” was allowed to exist in the first place

40 Riverside's facade. (Courtesy Extell)

40 Riverside’s facade. (Courtesy Extell)

In the past week, those two words—”poor door”—have quickly come to signify the vast inequality embedded in New York City’s housing market. At issue is a separate entrance for tenants living in subsidized rental units in a luxury condo building on the Upper West Side known as 40 Riverside. The property, developed by Extell, was financed through the city’s inclusionary housing program, which grants a tax abatement and additional bulk to developers who include a certain portion of “affordable” units in a project.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York’s Port Authority Bus Terminal to get $90 million band-aid

Port Authority terminal. (Flickr / rosebennet)

Port Authority terminal. (Flickr / rosebennet)

Nobody likes the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan. Nobody. And an infusion of $90 million probably won’t change that. According to the New York Times, the money, which was approved by the authority last week, will be used for fairly minor improvements including better cell phone service, improved restrooms, and more legible signs.

Read More

Cranbrook picks Christopher Scoates to replace Reed Kroloff

Eliel Saarinen, Cranbook Academy of Arts, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 1978, photograph by Balthazar Korab. (Courtesy Estate of Balthazar Korab)

Eliel Saarinen, Cranbook Academy of Arts, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 1978, photograph by Balthazar Korab. (Courtesy Estate of Balthazar Korab)

More than one year after Reed Kroloff announced he would leave his post as director of Michigan’s Cranbrook Academy of Art, the illustrious arts campus and museum has plucked an art museum director from the West Coast to fill his shoes.

Continue reading after the jump.

With Some Cash From Related Companies, Citi Bike Could Expand Next Year

Citi Bike dock. (Flickr / shinya)

Citi Bike dock. (Flickr / shinya)

The latest piece in the ongoing saga of Citi Bike actually contains some good news. The Wall Street Journal first reported that Related Companies, through its affiliate, REQX Ventures, is close to finishing a deal that would inject millions of dollars into the struggling, but popular, bike share system.

Read More

After delays, new D.C. streetcar line hopes to open in November

A D.C. streetcar. (Flickr / Mr.TinDC)

A D.C. streetcar. (Flickr / Mr.TinDC)

After missing its 2013 deadline, Washington D.C.’s streetcar could possibly open this fall—that’s according to a source involved with the project. The in-the-know individual told American University’s radio station, WAMU, that the H Street-Benning Road line could be up and running the first week of November.

Read More

Will Beverly Hills High’s Plans Destroy The City’s Most Famous Oil Derrick?

Beverly Hills' Oil Derrick (D Boone)

Tower of Hope as seen from Pico Boulevard. (D Boone)

One of the insider landmarks of Beverly Hills is the Tower of Hope, an art-covered oil derrick that sits at the edge of Beverly Hills High School, clearly visible from Pico Boulevard. Covered with fabric panels painted with colorful flowers by young hospital patients, the 155-foot-tall tower is a remnant from the days when the area was covered with oil fields (the high school once contained almost 20), and it’s become a popular visiting spot. It also still pumps oil, for Denver-based Venoco, with some of the proceeds going to the school. But Beverly Hills High’s major expansion plans call for removing the well altogether.

Continue reading after the jump.

Deborah Berke, SHoP, Tod Williams Billie Tsien to compete for new Cummins’ Indianapolis headquarters

(Jay Denney via Flickr)

(Jay Denney via Flickr)

Engine manufacturer Cummins Corporation announced plans for a new regional headquarters in Indianapolis Monday, but the Columbus, Indiana–based Fortune 500 company won’t look to local design talent to lead the project. Instead, three of the country’s leading names—all based in New York City—will compete for the project.

Continue reading after the jump.

Navy Pier redesign gets $20 million private donation

The $20 million donation helps fund the redesign of Gateway Park, which Mayor Rahm Emanuel called Chicago's new "front door." (James Corner Field Operations)

The $20 million donation helps fund the redesign of Gateway Park, which Mayor Rahm Emanuel called Chicago’s new “front door.” (James Corner Field Operations)

Chicago’s Navy Pier is currently undergoing major changes courtesy of a design team led by James Corner Field Operations. That work got an infusion of cash Thursday, as local benefactors from the Polk Bros. department store chain announced a donation of $20 million. It’s the single largest private gift ever made to Navy Pier, Illinois’ most-visited tourist attraction. Read More

New York City’s New Amsterdam Market Will Not Return

East, News, Preservation
Tuesday, July 15, 2014
.
New Amsterdam Market. (Flickr / Garrett Ziegler)

New Amsterdam Market. (Flickr / Garrett Ziegler)

After seven years in business, the New Amsterdam Market near New York City’s South Street Seaport is closing up shop. “We held a total 88 markets and numerous innovative celebrations of our region’s bounty; supported nearly 500 food entrepreneurs; and contributed to the creation of more than 350 jobs,” Robert LaValva, the market’s founder, said in a statement. “However, I was never able to raise the funding or attract the influential backers needed for our organization to thrive.”

Read More

Page 2 of 1012345...10...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License