Millennium Park Turns Ten! Here Are Ten Amazing Photos of Chicago’s Jewel Through the Years

(Katie Spence / Flickr)

(Katie Spence / Flickr)

Happy birthday, Millennium Park! Yes, the Chicago park named for the chronological milestone now 14 years in the rearview mirror is turning 10—it went famously over-schedule and over-budget but we love it nonetheless. Last year 4.75 million people visited Chicago’s front yard, taking in free concerts and events, and probably taking at least as many selfies with Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate and the flowing titanium locks of Frank Gehry‘s Pritzker Pavilion in the background.

In honor of the anniversary, the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events is kicking off a series of shows and exhibitions that includes new work from Crown Fountain designer Jaume Plensa. Hey, Jaume! Email us if you need another face for your 40-foot LED projection!

Here at AN, we’re celebrating with ten of our favorite photographs of the park taken over the past decade and more. Take a look below.

Ten amazing photos of Millennium Park after the jump!

Boston’s Green Line Extension Sending Real Estate Prices North

The Green Line in Boston. (Flickr /  bindonlane)

The Green Line in Boston. (Flickr / bindonlane)

Boston’s subway system—the “T”—is currently undergoing its first expansion in nearly three decades, pushing the city’s Green Line into the hip enclave of Somerville. And while the first stations in neighboring Somerville won’t open until 2017 (at the earliest), the promise of new transit is already transforming the city’s real estate market. The streetscape is coming next.

Continue reading after the jump.

Friday> Freecell & Pulitzer Foundation turn a vacant lot in St. Louis into a parade of public programs

Conceptual rendering of Lots at the PXSTL site  Image. (Freecell Architecture via Pulitzer Foundation)

Conceptual rendering of Lots at the PXSTL site. (Freecell Architecture via Pulitzer Foundation)

Last year, a vacant lot across the street from the Pulitzer Foundation in St. Louis became the site of a design competition for a temporary built-environment installation. New York’s Freecell Architecture won PXSTL’s $50,000 project budget and $10,000 honorarium for a proposal to erect an adjustable canopy for performances and gatherings—an idea Kristina Van Dyke, director of the Pulitzer Foundation, called “both monumental and ephemeral at the same time.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Work to begin on Cincinnati’s Central Parkway bike path

Chicago's first protected bike lane—photographed at Kinzie and Jefferson streets Monday, July 25, 2011—is cited as a model for Cincinnati's Central Parkway plan.  (E. Jason Wambsgans/ Chicago Tribune)

Chicago’s first protected bike lane—photographed at Kinzie and Jefferson streets Monday, July 25, 2011 for the Chicago Tribune—is cited as a model for Cincinnati’s Central Parkway plan. (Courtesy E. Jason Wambsgans/ Chicago Tribune via City of Cincinnati)

Cyclists in Cincinnati will soon have a separated bike lane along Central Parkway—a major connector between neighborhoods including Downtown, the West End, and Over-the-Rhine—following a narrow City Council vote last week. Read More

New York City Calls For Free, Outdoor Wi-Fi Network With Reinvented Payphones

City Terrain, East, News, Urbanism
Wednesday, May 7, 2014
.
NYFi proposal by Sage and Coomber Architects

NYFi proposal by Sage and Coombe Architects. (Courtesy Sage & Coombe)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has issued an RFP to create a network of free, outdoor Wi-Fi hotspots across all five boroughs. The network would become one of the largest in the country, and have a significant impact on the city’s streetscape. That’s because the plan transforms New York’s aging system of payphones—commonly known today as al fresco “toilets”—with what are being described by the city as public connection points.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Rights of Way: Mobility & the City Tackles Interrelated Urban Issues

(Courtesy BSA Space)

(Courtesy BSA Space)

Rights of Way: Mobility and the City
BSA Space
290 Congress Street, Suite 200
Boston
Through May 26

Rights of Way: Mobility and the City examines transportation and mobility in the global city through dozens of examples of how the city is shaped by the ways people move through it. Curated by James Graham and Meredith Miller of architecture studio MILLIGRAM-office, the exhibition seeks to demonstrate that our urban environment is a result of a complicated set of negotiations between designers, policy makers, the private sector, and individual residents.

Read More

Slideshow> Michael Van Valkenburgh’s Design for Tulsa Park

05b-tulsa-oklahoma-park-mvva-archpaper05a-tulsa-oklahoma-park-mvva-archpaper

As AN reported in our recent Southwest edition, Michael Van Valkenburgh is hard at work on plans for a massive park in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  According to the article, “The community expressed a strong need for the park to accommodate not just children, but the whole family unit. Having a variety of activities for a wide age range became a primary factor in the development of the design.” The $300 million waterfront plan is expected to be complete by 2017. MVVA shared this set of renderings with AN to keep us excited in the meantime.

More after the jump.

Dramatic New Sculpture for Boise City Hall Hopes to Activate The City’s Civic Heart

Art, City Terrain, West
Monday, May 5, 2014
.
(CTY Studio)

(CTY Studio)

Boise, Idaho–based architects CTY Studio and design company Ecosystems Sciences have won an RFP to design a new public sculpture for Boise’s soon-to-be-renovated City Hall Plaza. Both the sculpture and the plaza are expected to be completed by fall 2015. The $200,000 sculpture, called Terrain, Civics, Ecology, will be made up of nine 20-foot-tall steel panels, arranged in a circle to create an enclosure that pedestrians can walk through.

More after the jump.

Letter to the Editor> Let There Be Light

The site could become part of the Grand Center arts and culture district. (Courtesy Gluckman Mayner)

The site could become part of the Grand Center arts and culture district. (Courtesy Gluckman Mayner)

[Editor's Note: The following are reader-submitted comments in response to the article “Born Again” (AN 02_02.19.2014_MW). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com. ]

This reminds me quite a bit of the never-built proposal, Bombed Churches as War Memorials (1945), published in London after WWII, which presented various designs for bombed-out churches to be preserved in ruined form with the addition of garden plantings and a few amenities.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Louisville Names Winners in Competition to Creatively Reuse Abandoned Lots Across the City

(dye scape)

(dye scape)

In January Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer implored local designers and developers to propose ideas for 250 of the city’s several thousand vacant lots. Last week they announced four winners, which included gardens of dye plants for local textile production; a Habitat for Humanity–style homeownership program; environmental remediation via lavender fields; and meditation gardens made of recycled materials.

See the winning proposals after the jump.

Friday> One Day In LA, an Open Source Investigation of Los Angeles

City Terrain, West
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
.
Screen Shot 2014-04-01 at 1.14.49 PM

Looking up at Downtown LA’s skyline.  (onedayinla.org)

This Friday hundreds of filmmakers, non-profits, and citizens will take place in One Day In LA, a “media creation event” compiling videos that investigate the future of the city. The resulting shoots, which are being collected on onedayla.org, will be shared in an interactive archive and (in edited form) on a television series on public TV about the future of the American city. Continue reading after the jump.

Michael Kimmelman Proposes A Queens-Brooklyn Waterfront Streetcar

The proposed streetcar route. (Courtesy New York Times)

The proposed streetcar route. (Courtesy New York Times)

As development along the Brooklyn and Queens’ waterfront has increased dramatically over the years, transportation options—for residents old and new—has not. The number of glass towers, startups, and parks along the East River has only been matched by style pieces on new “it” neighborhoods from Astoria to Red Hook. But, now, the New York Times’ Michael Kimmelman has used his platform to launch a plan to change that equation, and give these neighborhoods the transportation system they deserve.

Continue reading after the jump.

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