New round of TIGER Grants goes out to cities and states

The Brooklyn Greenway. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

The Brooklyn Greenway. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

The federal Department of Transportation has issued its latest round of its Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grants for cities and states around the country. The grant program was created in 2009 through President Obama’s economic stimulus package and has since provided $3.5 billion to 270 projects. While the DOT has not officially announced the recipients of these new grants, which total $600 million, multiple politicians have been touting the money heading to their districts. Here are some of the projects we know about so far.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> Norman Foster & Fernando Romero team up to design Mexico City’s new $9.2 billion airport

Mexico City's new airport will aim for a light environmental footprint through natural ventilation and a massive central hub. (foster + partners / FR-EE)

Mexico City’s new airport will aim for a light environmental footprint through natural ventilation and a massive central hub. (foster + partners / FR-EE)

A new international airport for Mexico City won’t just fix the problems of its predecessor—which typically delays planes because the two runways were built too close together—it will be unique in its efficient expansive single enclosure, according to its architects, Foster + Partners and FR-EE.

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Registration extended for the vision42design competition

vision42-nyc

(Courtesy Vision42)

The vision42design competition to rethink and redesign the entire length of New York City’s 42nd Street was launched last April by AN and The Institute for Rational Urban Mobility. Entrants in the competition have the opportunity to not only rethink this important street but transform Manhattan at its core and become a model for major urban thoroughfares worldwide.

 

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Ribbon cut at Philadelphia’s revamped Dilworth Park

Architecture, East, Transportation, Urbanism
Thursday, September 4, 2014
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The ribbon cutting at Dilworth Park. (© OLIN / Sahar Coston-Hardy)

The ribbon cutting at Dilworth Park. (OLIN / Sahar Coston-Hardy)

Earlier today, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter cut the ribbon on Dilworth Park—a new 120,000-square-foot public space next to City Hall. OLIN led the $55 million renovation of the site which now includes an expansive lawn, a café, new trees and seating, and a nearly 12,000-square-foot fountain that converts into an ice skating rink in the winter.

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Report warns of runaway sprawl in Columbus, Ohio

A land-use map projecting suburban sprawl around Columbus, Ohio. (Courtesy Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission, Columbus 2020 and ULI Columbus)

A land-use map projecting suburban sprawl around Columbus, Ohio. (Courtesy Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission, Columbus 2020 and ULI Columbus)

By 2050 the city of Columbus, Ohio and its expanding suburbs could more than triple the city’s footprint, according to a new study examining sprawl around Ohio’s capital.

Continue reading after the jump.

Five new apps put urban planning at your fingertips

oppspace

(Courtesy OpportunitySpace)

In the age of apps, we have seen basic human activities like eating, dating, shopping, and exercising be condensed into simple swipes and clicks. It’s a brave new world and one that has folded-in the complex process of financing, developing, and designing new projects. And in recent years, there has been a batch of new apps designed to help planners, architects, cities, and the general public create more livable cities. Here are a few of those apps that caught AN’s attention. Read More

Grimshaw’s transit-oriented public plaza breaks ground in the Bronx

Fordham Plaza. (Courtesy NYC Department of Transportation)

Fordham Plaza. (Courtesy NYC Department of Transportation)

The New York City Department of Transportation recently broke ground on the second phase of Fordham Plaza’s reconstruction in the Bronx. The revamped space will have all the standard-issue pieces of a New York City pedestrian plaza—the planters, benches, seating, trees, lights, and kiosks—but, ultimately, the plaza represents a significant investment in existing transportation infrastructure.

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Video> How the Bayonne Bridge’s roadway will be lifted 64 feet

East, Transportation, Urbanism
Thursday, August 28, 2014
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The Bayonne Bridge. (Flickr / wallyg)

The Bayonne Bridge. (Flickr / wallyg)

The 82-year-old Bayonne Bridge is getting some work done. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has begun the $1.3 billion process to raise the bridge’s roadway by 64 feet. Why, exactly? Well, to keep up with the times of course.

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Planning, transit, and parks projects are transforming Indianapolis

Tarkington Park is the subject of a redesign aimed at catalyzing neighborhood development and curbing crime. (Courtesy Rundell Ernesterberger Associates)

Tarkington Park is the subject of a redesign aimed at catalyzing neighborhood development and curbing crime. (Courtesy Rundell Ernesterberger Associates)

Indianapolis has been busy remaking its downtown, embarking on several developments and planning projects that city officials hope bode well for the city’s future growth. The editors at Indianapolis Monthly rounded them up this week, picking out “five projects improving Indy right now.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Reminder: Registration ends soon for the vision42design competition

(Courtesy vision42design)

(Courtesy vision42design)

The vision42design competition to rethink and redesign the entire length of New York City’s 42nd Street was launched last April by AN and The Institute for Rational Urban Mobility. Entrants in the competition have the opportunity to not only rethink this important street but transform Manhattan at its core and become a model for major urban thoroughfares worldwide.

Continue reading after the jump.

Michigan’s first bus rapid transit line launches today in Grand Rapids

Grand Rapids, home to Michigan's first bus rapid transit line. (Ian Freimuth via Flickr)

Grand Rapids, home to Michigan’s first bus rapid transit line. (Ian Freimuth via Flickr)

Michigan‘s first bus rapid transit line launches this week, whisking passengers from downtown Grand Rapids through the city’s “Medical Mile” and south suburbs—a 9.6-mile journey that used to take 45 minutes will now be only a 27-minute commute, reported mlive.com.

Continue reading after the jump.

Construction finally underway on Detroit’s 3.3-mile-long M-1 rail line

The 80-foot, 3,000-pound rails that will become the M1 Rail track have begun to arrive in Detroit. (Courtesy image - M1 Rail)

The 80-foot, 3,000-pound rails that will become the M1 Rail track have begun to arrive in Detroit. (Courtesy M1 Rail)

After years of planning, Detroit‘s M-1 Rail Line took an important step into physical reality this week, as piles of 80-foot-long, 3,000-pound rails arrived on construction sites that will build the 3.3 mile streetcar line by the end of 2016. Read More

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